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Pottery Highlights

Below are examples of exceptional results for Pottery auctioned by Case Antiques, Inc. The sold price includes the Buyer’s Premium. If you have items like these in an estate, a private collection, or a museum, and would like to sell them, visit our selling page to learn more about consigning. We appreciate your interest!

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(Note: Prices realized include a buyer's premium.)

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Lot 64: Exceptional and rare Greene County, TN redware jar, marked,  J.A. Lowe Exceptional and rare Greene County, TN redware jar, marked, J.A. Lowe Lot 64: Exceptional and rare Greene County, TN redware jar, marked,  J.A. Lowe

Exceptional glazed and stamped redware jar by J. A. Lowe (John Alexander Lowe, 1833-1902), Greene County, Tennessee. A pottery site attributed to him has been located and excavated near the Harmon Cemetery. Hundreds of sherds were recovered from the site bearing the name J. A. Lowe. The 1860 census for Greene County shows Lowe as living nearby with Blue Springs as the Post Office. Lowe enlisted in the Confederate Army two days after Christopher Alexander Haun was hung by Confederate forces on December 11, 1861. Haun was a Union sympathizer who took part in burning the Lick Creek railroad bridge during the Civil War. This important event in East Tennessee’s Civil War history was initiated with a campaign by Union loyalists to burn 9 bridges. It was led by William B. Carter and strongly supported and encouraged by President Abraham Lincoln. Several potters from the Pottertown area were among the men who conspired and succeeded in burning the bridge. However, the Union loyalists allowed the guards to go free based upon their solemn promises to not reveal their identities. Union troops did not materialize as promised, and the Confederates were able to pursue and capture some of the perpetrators. The Confederate guards, who were allowed to live, were the very ones who served as witnesses to implicate the five men who were hung, four of them potters. Among those sentenced to hang was the potter Christopher Alexander Haun. His pots clearly speak for his having been a master potter. In a letter which Haun wrote to his wife in his last hours he said “have Bohanan, Hinshaw or Low to finish off that ware and do the best you can with it for your support.” It is highly probable that Haun was referring to J. A . Lowe in this letter. This decorated J. A. Lowe jar has very similar characteristics to known C. A. Haun jars. The general form of the jar, the appearance of the extruded handles with the decoration at the handle attachments and the stamp design around the shoulder of the jar with the name of the potter are all similar to marked C. A. Haun jars. J. A. Lowe was almost 29 years of age when Haun was hung. Whether Lowe apprenticed under C. A. Haun is not known at this time. Lowe’s Confederate Certificate of Disability for Discharge dated February 21, 1862 (Courtesy of Donahue Bible) records his occupation as potter. It is also not known if Lowe ever potted again after being discharged from the military. He and his family were living in Indiana by 1865. They had moved to Arkansas by 1880. He died in Arkansas. At this time this jar is the only known example of J. A. Lowe’s work. Condition – overall very good condition with a few old chips to the rim. Height 13 5/8″, circa 1860 (research and description assistance courtesy of Carole Wahler). [See more photos →]

$63,000.00
Lot 229: Cobalt Decorated Kentucky Churn, Isaac Thomas Cobalt Decorated Kentucky Churn, Isaac Thomas Lot 229: Cobalt Decorated Kentucky Churn, Isaac Thomas

Early and large cobalt decorated pottery churn, stamped “I. Thomas” (Isaac Thomas, working in the area around Maysville-Lexington KY approximately 1834-1876). Eight gallon capacity mark with square cross hatched stamp surrounded by a cobalt looped border, “Kentucky 1836” in cobalt script, three cobalt decorated flowers below script. Reverse side with cobalt script, “I Thomas Manufacturer” with three cobalt decorated flowers below script. Cobalt decoration stripe on the upper side of lug handles. Condition – small chip to glazed body left of date, losses/chips to handles and various hairline cracks to upper section, indicating repair to rim area. 23 5/8″ H. [See more photos →]

$55,200.00
Lot 161: Edgefield SC Pottery Face Jug, Thomas Davies Factory Edgefield SC Pottery Face Jug, Thomas Davies Factory Lot 161: Edgefield SC Pottery Face Jug, Thomas Davies Factory

Edgefield District, South Carolina stoneware alkaline pottery face jug, made at the Thomas Davies Factory (1861-1864) by an unknown African American maker. Light to dark olive green alkaline glaze with kaolin eyes and teeth, wide set eyes, singular eyebrow and large nose. 4 3/4" H x 4 1/4" dia. Circa 1862. Note: This face vessel was examined and documented at the McKissick Museum by Jill Beute Koverman. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Excellent condition with some glaze voids and firing flaws in the making. [See more photos →]

$40,800.00
Lot 231: East Tennessee Redware Jar, C.A. Haun East Tennessee Redware Jar, C.A. Haun Lot 231: East Tennessee Redware Jar, C.A. Haun

Greene County, TN slip and copper oxide decorated redware jar by Christopher Alexander Haun, 1821-1861. Marked on upper rim with the stamped letters “C A Haun ” and compass flower stamping. Condition – old chips to one handle, abrasions and expected wear to body. One hairline crack from mouth about three inches in length. 13″ H. Note – Haun was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War and participated in burning a Confederate railroad bridge (Lick Creek) in Greene County, TN. This important event in East Tennessee¨_s Civil War history was initiated with a campaign by Union loyalists to burn 9 bridges. It was led by William B. Carter and strongly supported and encouraged by President Abraham Lincoln. Several potters from the Pottertown, TN area were among the men who conspired and succeeded in burning the bridge. The potters decided not to capture or kill the Confederate bridge guards but allowed them to go free based upon their solemn promises to not reveal their identities. Union troops did not materialize as promised, and the Confederates were able to pursue and capture some of the perpetrators. The Confederate guards, who were allowed to live, were the very ones who served as witnesses to implicate the five men who were hung, four of them potters. Among those sentenced to hang was the potter Christopher Alexander Haun. On December 11th, 1861, Haun was hung from the gallows in Knoxville, TN. Of the handful of marked C.A. Haun jars known, the combination of yellow slip and copper oxide decoration is unique to this example. For another marked example of Christopher Haun’s pottery, refer to the Art of Tennessee, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, p. 115, figure 82. The relationship between Haun and another potter from Greene County, John Alexander Lowe (1833-1902), is not completely known at this time but a marked J. A. Lowe jar sold by this auction house in September 2008 displayed similar characteristics to known C. A. Haun jars. The general form of the jar, the appearance of the extruded handles with decoration at the handle attachments, and the stamp design around the shoulder of the jar with the name of the potter are all similar to marked C. A. Haun jars. In his last hours, Haun wrote to his wife and said ¨Áhave Bohanan, Hinshaw or Low to finish off that ware and do the best you can with it for your support.¨Â Whether Lowe apprenticed under C. A. Haun is not known at this time. Lowe enlisted in the Confederate Army two days after Christopher Alexander Haun was hung by Confederate forces. [See more photos →]

$36,800.00
Lot 155: C A Haun Earthenware Pottery Jar, Greene Co., TN C A Haun Earthenware Pottery Jar, Greene Co., TN Lot 155: C A Haun Earthenware Pottery Jar, Greene Co., TN

Christopher Alexander Haun (Greene County, TN, 1821-1861) lead and copper oxide decorated earthenware jar. Ovoid form with tapered rim edge, symmetrical extruded lug handles, bulbous midsection tapering to a beaded base. Unglazed bottom. Coggled band on upper shoulder with stylized lettering “C A Haun No. 1″ and elaborate tread stamp designs at the base of the handles. 13″ H x 10 1/2” dia. Provenance: Greene Co., TN Family. Note: One of a small group of marked C. A. Haun jars known, the stylized “C. A. Haun No. 1” script on this example varies slightly from other examples. The tread stamps on the handles are very similar to the tread stamp pattern on a C. A. Haun marked earthenware ring bottle sold by this auction house in July 2014. Historical Note: Christopher Alexander Haun was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War and participated in burning a Confederate railroad bridge (Lick Creek) in Greene County, TN. This important event in East Tennessee’s Civil War history was initiated with a campaign by Union loyalists to burn 9 bridges. It was led by William B. Carter and strongly supported and encouraged by President Abraham Lincoln. Several potters from the Pottertown, TN area were among the men who conspired and succeeded in burning the bridge. The potters decided not to capture or kill the Confederate bridge guards but allowed them to go free based upon their solemn promises to not reveal their identities. Union troops did not materialize as promised, and the Confederates were able to pursue and capture some of the perpetrators. The Confederate guards, who were allowed to live, were the very ones who served as witnesses to implicate the five men who were hung, four of them potters. Among those sentenced to hang was the potter Christopher Alexander Haun. In his last hours, Haun wrote to his wife and said “have Bohanan, Hinshaw or Low to finish off that ware and do the best you can with it for your support”. On December 11th, 1861, Haun was hung from the gallows in Knoxville, TN. CONDITION: Old chip near base (1 3/4″ width) with some smaller scattered chips in proximity to larger chip, old stain residue to midsection of vessel, interior with chips and glaze flaking. [See more photos →]

$36,000.00
Lot 141: East TN Earthenware Jar w/ Manganese Decoration East TN Earthenware Jar w/ Manganese Decoration Lot 141: East TN Earthenware Jar w/ Manganese Decoration

East Tennessee, Greene or Sullivan County, lead glazed earthenware jar with manganese splotched decoration, pulled loop handles, rim and upper shoulder with incised concentric lines, unglazed base with beaded foot. 15" H. For a related form, refer to the article, "Earthenware Potters Along the Great Road in Virginia and Tennessee," J. Roderick Moore, Antiques Magazine, September 1983, p. 532, plate IV. This form is one of the largest found from this group. Provenance: Descended through the Bireley Estate, Hamblen County, Tennessee. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. [See more photos →]

$31,200.00
Lot 126: East TN Earthenware Ring Bottle, stamped C.A. Haun East TN Earthenware Ring Bottle, stamped C.A. Haun Lot 126: East TN Earthenware Ring Bottle, stamped C.A. Haun

Exceptionally rare and large Christopher Haun East Tennessee ring bottle, copper oxide and lead glazed earthenware with elaborate tread stamp designs and coggled band around outer circumference consisting of hexagonal and diamond star geometric designs and letters, “HAUN” (Christopher Alexander Haun, Greene Co., TN, 1821-1861). Christopher Haun was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War and participated in burning a Confederate railroad bridge (Lick Creek) in Greene County, TN. This important event in East Tennessee Civil War history was initiated with a campaign by Union loyalists to burn 9 bridges. It was led by William B. Carter and strongly supported and encouraged by President Abraham Lincoln. Several potters from the Pottertown, TN area were among the men who conspired and succeeded in burning the bridge. The potters decided not to capture or kill the Confederate bridge guards but allowed them to go free based upon their solemn promises to not reveal their identities. Union troops did not materialize as promised, and the Confederates were able to pursue and capture some of the perpetrators. The Confederate guards, who were allowed to live, were the very ones who served as witnesses to implicate the five men who were hung, four of them potters. Among those sentenced to death was the potter Christopher Alexander Haun. On December 11th, 1861, Haun was hung from the gallows in Knoxville, TN. Provenance – descended through the John Houston Cox family of Lenoir City, TN (b. 1863 – 1949). Diameter 10″, total length including spout, 10 3/4″. (Research courtesy of Carole Wahler). Note: one of the most elaborately decorated Southern ring bottles to surface, it is believed to be the only C.A. Haun ring bottle example extant, and is the earliest Tennessee ring bottle example by a known maker. Condition: Overall excellent condition. Condition: Overall excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$30,680.00
Lot 101: An exceptional East Tennessee redware pitcher, attributed to Cain pottery An exceptional East Tennessee redware pitcher, attributed to Cain pottery Lot 101: An exceptional East Tennessee redware pitcher, attributed to Cain pottery

East Tennessee redware pitcher, attributed to the Cain pottery of Sullivan County, TN. Manganese and gold/yellow slip decoration with multiple sine wave incising around midsection, extruded handle. Manganese drips run down the interior of the pitcher as well. The glaze, elaborate use of manganese and yellow slips, and sine wave incising is exceptional on this example. This pitcher was in the 1997 “Made by East Tennessee Hands: Pottery” exhibit at The East Tennessee Historical Society, Carole Wahler, guest curator. For examples of similar decorated pitchers, refer to the article, “Earthenware Potters Along the Great Road in Virginia and Tennessee”, J. Roderick Moore, Antiques Magazine, September 1983, p. 534, plate IX. Condition – very minor glaze wear on the rim of pitcher, old shallow chip at the rim near handle, otherwise excellent. 6 1/2″ height. Mid 19th century. Recognition of the prolific Cain pottery in East Tennessee was noted in published resources as early as 1909, where Oliver Taylor in “Historic Sullivan” states “Another factory which received national attention was the Cain pottery, located at Emanuel church, and owned by two brothers, William M. and Abe Cain . . . . .. It was operated about 1840 and, among other wares, souvenir jugs were made, many of which are still in existence.” (research courtesy Carole Wahler). [See more photos →]

$22,500.00
Lot 125: East TN Miniature Redware Jug, G. Mort East TN Miniature Redware Jug, G. Mort Lot 125: East TN Miniature Redware Jug, G. Mort

East Tennessee miniature redware jug incised and dated, ìGeorge Mort, May the 27th 1859,? Mort pottery family of Jefferson County, TN. Triple sine wave incising along with triple incised lines around upper body with circular and diamondstarburst stamps around the lower mid section. Pulled handle with starburst stamp at the terminus. 4 3/8″ H. Circa 1859. During the Civil War, George Mort enlisted as a Confederate private in Company C, 39th Infantry Regiment Tennessee. Documentation at this stage of research does not indicate George returned home from the War. Georgeís brother, S. M. Mort, served in the Union as a 1st Lieutenant with the 9th Tennessee Cavalry Volunteers, Company F (research courtesy CaroleWahler). A tintype of S.M. Mort in his Union uniform is also offered in this auction. [See more photos →]

$19,550.00
Lot 96: Rare stamped Chandler Edgefield SC jar and lid Rare stamped Chandler Edgefield SC jar and lid Lot 96: Rare stamped Chandler Edgefield SC jar and lid

Rare South Carolina lidded stoneware butter crock by Thomas Chandler, Edgefield District, with original domed lid and applied lug handles. Green alkaline glazed stoneware with slip swag decoration on both crock and lid. Stamped “Chandler Maker” on top of the lid and on the shoulder of crock. Condition – Old chip to the inside rim of crock, above right lug handle(does not penetrate the wall). One small chip to lower edge of lid handle. Overall height – 9″. Crock measures 7″ Height x 8 1/2″ Diameter. Lid measures 9 1/2″ diameter. Second-quarter of the 19th century. Thomas M. Chandler (born 1810 Virginia, died 1854 North Carolina) is referred to as ” . . . Edgefield’s premier potter . . .” states Cinda Baldwin on page 47 of Great and Noble Jar. Though born in Virginia, Thomas may have brought a northern influence into South Carolina pottery. He enlisted in the army in Albany, New York in 1832 (Baldwin, page 148). This suggests that he may have potted briefly in New York. A decorated jar made by him bears a decided resemblance to New York statewide mouth jar forms with lug handles. His straight-sided cake crocks are also reminiscent of northern cobalt decorated crocks. In 1838, he married into the Durham family of potters in Edgefield. The 1840 census shows Thomas, 29 years old, and family living near others involved in the pottery industry. There are no slaves listed in either his household or Isaac Durham’s (page B of this census is shown below). A jar signed in script “Chandler Maker/1844” is perhaps the earliest recorded piece of pottery made by him. Among his known stamps are: Chandler, Chandler/Maker and Chandler/Warranted (Baldwin, pages 51 and 54). In the 1850 census Thomas and his wife, Margaret, have four daughters and two sons. Thomas is 40 years old and his occupation is listed as “Stoneware Manufactory”. They are living next door to Francis Devillin, age 44, potter. According to Cinda Baldwin (page 53), Thomas Chandler had $1500 invested in his pottery at that time and eleven slave and journeyman potters working. A full range of forms were produced. Thomas set up a trust for his wife and children in 1852. He placed all of his property, including slaves, in that trust. He died in North Carolina in 1854 (Baldwin, pages 54 and 75). Thomas Chandler appears to have played an important role in the development of decorated Edgefield wares. Cinda Baldwin (page 148) states “Chandler was clearly a key figure in the production of Edgefield decorated stoneware, having turned ware at all of the Edgefield factories where slip decoration was widely used” (research courtesy Carole Wahler). [See more photos →]

$18,460.00
Lot 151: East TN Redware Jar w/ Manganese Decoration East TN Redware Jar w/ Manganese Decoration Lot 151: East TN Redware Jar w/ Manganese Decoration

East Tennessee, possibly Sullivan County, lead glazed earthenware jar with manganese splotched decoration, applied rolled handles, rim and upper shoulder with incised rings, unglazed base with beaded foot. 13 3/4″ H. For a related form, refer to the article, “Earthenware Potters Along the Great Road in Virginia and Tennessee”, J. Roderick Moore, Antiques Magazine, September 1983, p. 532, plate IV. CONDITION: Overall very good condition, old small rim chip and three chips to base edge. [See more photos →]

$17,110.00
Lot 38: Rare Tennessee redware jar, stamped C A Haun Rare Tennessee redware jar, stamped C A Haun Lot 38: Rare Tennessee redware jar, stamped C A Haun

Extremely rare and important redware jar by Christopher Alexander Haun (1821-1861), Greene County, Tennessee. Haun was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War and participated in burning a Confederate railroad bridge (Lick Creek) in Greene County, TN. In 1861, Confederate forces captured Christopher Haun and put him to death by hanging. The marked jar has two rows of stamping on the upper midsection including the letters “C A Haun”, star stamping around rim and terminus of handles, and copper oxide glaze with manganese loop designs on body. This is the only known marked C A Haun example with these specific “star” stamps around the rim and handle terminus. This jar is illustrated in “Art of Tennessee” book, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee, p. 115, and was exhibited in the Frist “Art of Tennessee” exhibit from September 2003 – January 2004. Condition – The upper end of the handle and a small fragment to the rim are restored (a complete restoration report with pictures will be provided with this lot). The original fragment broken off was 7/16″ width x 1/4″ deep and triangular in shape. The upper end of the handle broke on an original drying or shrinkage crack in the handle with the thumbprint at the upper terminus and the sunburst type stamp at the base surviving. Blind cracks radiate from the break with another blind crack located adjacent to the other intact handle. 10″ height (ref38). [See more photos →]

$13,800.00
Lot 44: Large North Carolina jar, stamped N.H. Dixon Large North Carolina jar, stamped N.H. Dixon Lot 44: Large North Carolina jar, stamped N.H. Dixon

Important and rare North Carolina stoneware jar, stamped “N.H. Dixon” (Nathaniel H. Dixon, 1827-1863, Chatham County, NC). Alkaline glaze drips on side with the stamp. Provenance – John Gordon Collection, NYC. Condition – very good condition, small shallow rim chip to back side of jar, remnants of grease residue on jar. 15 1/2″ height. Mid 19th century. [See more photos →]

$13,800.00
Lot 43: Large East TN redware storage jar, attrib. Cain pottery Large East TN redware storage jar, attrib. Cain pottery Lot 43: Large East TN redware storage jar, attrib. Cain pottery

Large East Tennessee redware pottery storage jar, lead glaze body with manganese stripe decoration, sine wave incising around upper shoulder, extruded or pulled smooth handles, attributed to Sullivan Co., Tennessee or Southwest Virginia. For a similar example of a large decorated jar, refer to the article, “Earthenware Potters Along the Great Road in Virginia and Tennessee”, J. Roderick Moore, Antiques Magazine, September 1983, p. 532, plate III. Condition: Overall very good condition with chips to one side of the rim, minor chips to base. 15″ Height. Mid 19th century. Note – recognition of the prolific Cain pottery in East Tennessee was noted in published resources as early as 1909, where Oliver Taylor in “Historic Sullivan” states, “Another factory which received national attention was the Cain pottery, located at Emanuel Church, and owned by two brothers, William M. and Abe Cain . . . It was operated about 1840 and, among other wares, souvenir jugs were made, many of which are still in existence.” (Research courtesy Carole Wahler.) [See more photos →]

$12,650.00
Lot 123: Middle TN Pottery Jar, poss. Hedgecough Middle TN Pottery Jar, poss. Hedgecough Lot 123: Middle TN Pottery Jar, poss. Hedgecough

Large Middle TN stoneware pottery jar with applied heart, diamond, flower and swag decoration, double strap handles, and ruffled rim. Attributed to the Hedgecough Pottery (Putnam County, TN, 1890s – late 1930s). Green to brown transitional glaze. 15 3/4″ H. 18 lbs. Late 19th/early 20th century. Note: A similar example is featured on the cover of and on page 366 (Figure 2-177) Volume I of the book “Tennessee Potteries, Pots, and Potters-1790s to 1950”, by Samuel D. Smith and Stephen Rogers. Published in 2011 by Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Division of Archaeology. Provenance: Private Knoxville, TN collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. One firing flaw noted to handle. [See more photos →]

$10,384.00
Lot 158: Southwest VA Earthenware Lead-Glazed Jar Southwest VA Earthenware Lead-Glazed Jar Lot 158: Southwest VA Earthenware Lead-Glazed Jar

Southwest Virginia lead glazed earthenware ovoid form jar with rolled open loop handles terminating in thumb prints, flaring rim, and sine wave incising around the upper shoulder bordered by two incised lines. Base with beaded foot, unglazed bottom. Found in Grayson County, VA but possibly Washington Co., VA. 12" H. Second quarter of the 19th century. Note: The flaring rim, raised ridge above the shoulder, and thinner walls of this example are unusual attributes for Southwest Virginia earthenware. CONDITION: Old shallow chip to the rim, matted surface around base of handles suggest possible old repairs. [See more photos →]

$10,200.00
Lot 144: Washington Stoneware Presentation Pitcher, Coaquanock Lodge Washington Stoneware Presentation Pitcher, Coaquanock Lodge Lot 144: Washington Stoneware Presentation Pitcher, Coaquanock Lodge

Large Philadelphia cobalt decorated stoneware presentation pitcher, attributed to Richard C. Remmey, with applied relief molded bust decoration of George Washington, encircled by an applied relief molded wreath beneath the spout, along with two smaller relief molded female busts above and below, possibly emblematic of Fortune and/or Lady Liberty. Incised script with cobalt highlights near base, “Coaquanock Lodge No. 463, I.O.O.F. ” with the I.O.O. F. circle symbol flanking both sides of the inscription. Extensive cobalt floral decoration to both sides of body depicting leafy stems branching into two flower heads with additional leaf/feather decoration below the rim and flanking the spout. 13 3/8″ H. Second half 19th century, possibly made to coincide with Washington’s Centennial inauguration celebration. Note: A relief molded Washington pottery pitcher having decoration similar to this example can be found in “Decorated Stoneware Pottery of North America” by Donald Blake Webster, page 151, illustration 190. Biography (courtesy The American Odd Fellow, Volume 3, by John W. Orr, page 18, 1864): “Coaquanock Lodge, No. 463, was instituted on the 4th of March, 1852, in [Philadelphia], by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, since which time it has relieved 150 brothers in distress and sickness; 30 widowed families; and buried 15 brothers. Its present number of members in good standing is 122, principally of young men.” Records for this lodge date until 1925. Provenance: Private Tennessee collection. CONDITION: Old staple repair to side and old repaired breaks to rim. [See more photos →]

$10,148.00
Lot 78: Greene Co., Tennessee redware pitcher, stamped C.A. Haun Greene Co., Tennessee redware pitcher, stamped C.A. Haun Lot 78: Greene Co., Tennessee redware pitcher, stamped C.A. Haun

Rare redware pitcher by Christopher Alexander Haun (1821-1861), Greene County, Tennessee. Lead glaze with manganese or iron oxide loop designs. The marked pitcher is stamped on upper rim including the letters “C A Haun & Co” and compass star stamping with cross hatch stamping at terminus of handle. Condition – Handle missing with light wear and shallow chips around rim and base. Hairline cracks with minor exfoliation to glaze. 8 1/4″ H. Note – Haun was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War and participated in burning a Confederate railroad bridge (Lick Creek) in Greene County, TN. In 1861, Confederate forces captured Christopher Haun and put him to death by hanging. As of this writing, this is the only known marked Christopher Haun pitcher form. [See more photos →]

$9,988.00
Lot 107: Charles Decker Stoneware Pottery Rundlet, Dated/Signed Charles Decker Stoneware Pottery Rundlet, Dated/Signed Lot 107: Charles Decker Stoneware Pottery Rundlet, Dated/Signed

Washington Co., Tennessee stoneware pottery rundlet by Charles Frederick Decker (1832-1914), dated and inscribed in script, “Aug. 15th, 1897. Made by C. F. Decker Sr. at the Keystone Pottery of Chucky Valley Tenn.” This piece also has an additional inscribed star and heart motif around the spout, eight incised lines around the body. 15 1/2″ length, 8 1/2″ diameter on ends. Illustrated and exhibited in 2004, “The Pottery of Charles F. Decker: A Life Well Made,” Jonesborough/Washington County History Museum catalog, page 38. This rundlet is also illustrated in ìTennessee Potteries, Pots, and Potters ñ 1790-1950, Volume 1?, Samuel Smith and Steve Rogers, 2011, Figure 2-115, p. 273. Biography (Courtesy of Carole Wahler): Charles Frederick Decker was born in Germany in 1832. He arrived in Philadelphia in his late teens. Oral tradition suggests he worked at the Remmey Pottery before establishing his Keystone pottery there at the age of 25. He moved his family to Delaware for a few years and then back to Philadelphia. After 1869, Decker moved to Virginia, six miles north of Abingdon. The pottery he operated there was located on land owned by a man named Mallicote (Mallicoat). In 1872, he established his pottery in the Nolichucky River Valley near present day Johnson City, Tennessee. For a year or so he operated in both Virginia and Tennessee. He was one of a number of potters who settled in the region during the early years of Reconstruction. He named his Chucky Valley pottery the same name that he had used in Pennsylvania, Keystone Pottery. His pottery was marketed not only in East Tennessee, but also in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky. Condition: Overall very good condition with two shallow chips to one end and shallow chip to top opening. Firing mark to one side. [See more photos →]

$9,512.00
Lot 194: Signed & Dated Evansville, Indiana Temperance Snake Jug Signed & Dated Evansville, Indiana Temperance Snake Jug Lot 194: Signed & Dated Evansville, Indiana Temperance Snake Jug

Temperance jug, with thin brown glaze over light colored clay. Jug is incised to give the appearance of bark. Four dark brown animal forms are applied to the jug. The largest is a monkey which serves as a handle. A lizard, snake, and turtle are neatly placed on the other side facing the monkey. A large “B” and “1885” are incised vertically between the monkey and the lizard. “Bray” and “1885” are incised on the glaze covered bottom. 7 3/4″ high. The jug is attributed to Simeon Lewis Bray (1849-1914). He was born in Massachusetts, however, before he was a year old, the family was in Wisconsin, where they remained through 1855. By the 1860 census, they were in Anna, Union County, Illinois. This lot also includes 9 homemade seaweed calling cards. One has Maria H. Bray, Thatcher’s Island, Rockport, Mass on the back. Description, history and biography (Courtesy of Carole Wahler): The Kirkpatrick family established the Anna Pottery in 1859. Simeon’s occupation was listed as Turner in pottery and he was living 12 households from Wallace Kirkpatrick in 1870. Wallace was producing his now famous snake jugs during the 1870s and 1880s. These jugs reflected his interests in the temperance movement and wildlife, especially snakes, which he collected. Simeon married in 1876 in Evansville, Indiana and remained in the area until at least 1901 when he registered his second patent related to pottery production. By 1910 he was located in St. Louis City, Missouri still working as a potter. Simeon died there in 1914 but was buried in Evansville. He had two younger brothers, James W. and William F., who were also potters. Initially, it was theorized that James W. was the maker of this jug. Support for this notion was drawn from the 1880 Metropolis, Massac County, Illinois census where his occupation was listed as Clay Artist. At the time, he was working at a pottery which was originally established by John Kirkpatrick and one of his brothers-in-law. More support for the attribution resulted from discovering the existence of a temperance snake jug signed by J. W. Bray. Another very similar jug incised 1886 is attributed to him. However, the timely listing of a temperance jug by Schmidt’s Antiques in Michigan persuaded us of the error of our thinking (see https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/52092487_stoneware-temperance-snake-jug). The Schmidt jug is of similar size, clay color, glaze and decoration. It is overall qualitatively very similar and incised S L B and 1885 on the bottom. It provides the greatest support for the Simeon Lewis Bray attribution. The two J. W. Bray jugs are visually quite different from the two Bray 1885 jugs; and both the J. W. Bray jugs and the Bray 1885 jugs are different from Wallace Kirkpatrick’s realistic snake jugs. The Bray jugs have more of a folk art quality to them. An unsuccessful attempt was made to connect the Bray families that are associated with the seaweed calling cards to Simeon’s family. No guesses were formed as to how they came to be with the jug. Maria’s husband’s family and her mother’s Bray side of the family were in the United States long before Simeon’s family arrived. Maria was a remarkable woman and an enthusiastic supporter of the temperance movement (see http://www.nelights.com/blog/tag/maria-bray/). IMPORTANT UPDATE: Simeon Bray was in Huntingburg, Indiana at least during the early months of 1885 according to information provided by Brian Moore of Indianapolis. Additional communication with him suggests it may be more difficult to discriminate between pottery made by JWB and SLB than originally thought. Research continues. cw CONDITION: Overall excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$9,216.00
Lot 176: Rare NC Daniel Seagle 2-Handled Pottery Jug, Eight Gallons Rare NC Daniel Seagle 2-Handled Pottery Jug, Eight Gallons Lot 176: Rare NC Daniel Seagle 2-Handled Pottery Jug, Eight Gallons

Rare Daniel Seagle (1805-1867) North Carolina stoneware double handle pottery jug, 8-gallon capacity ovoid form with an olive alkaline glaze and combination of glossy and matte finish, two applied handles with channels and incised lines below the neck rim. Upper shoulder with incised initials "D S" for Daniel Seagle and a "8" denoting capacity. 19 1/2" H x approx. 16 3/4" dia. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition with some old chipping to base, scattered firing flaws to body. [See more photos →]

$9,000.00
Lot 201: Daniel Hartsoe North Carolina pottery jug Daniel Hartsoe North Carolina pottery jug Lot 201: Daniel Hartsoe North Carolina pottery jug

Exceptional and large North Carolina alkaline glazed jug, stamped on the upper shoulder “DH 5″ (Daniel Hartsoe, Lincoln County, NC 1836-1916). Glass rutile drip length of jug. During the Civil War, Daniel served in the Confederacy (Company B, 23rd NC Troops). Overall excellent condition with firing flaw or shallow chip on side of handle. 18” Height. 19th century. [See more photos →]

$8,388.00
Lot 140: East TN Presidential Presentation Harvest Jug East TN Presidential Presentation Harvest Jug Lot 140: East TN Presidential Presentation Harvest Jug

Important East Tennessee decorated Presidential presentation harvest jug. Harvest jug with extruded handle and two opposing spouts with two sine waves around the upper shoulder and an additional closed sine wave at the tip of the jar, resembling a sun motif. Possibly potted by Lewis Manning Haun (Greene County, TN, born 1835). Similar harvest jug forms attributed to L. M. Haun have are known. However, none of these jugs have retained the handle like this example. The inscription on one side reads “For President Gen. James A. Garfield of Ohio” and the other, “For Congress Hon. A. H. Pettibone of Green”. Additional inscriptions under each spout with “Garfield”and “Arthur”. 10 1/2″ H. Circa 1880. Historical note: James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was elected as President in the election of 1880 and Pettibone (1835-1918) was elected as a U.S. Congressman for East Tennessee the same year. This jug likely commemorates the 1880 national election. President Garfield’s presidency lasted only 200 days (March 4, 1881 – September 19, 1881) because he was assassinated by Charles J. Guiteau. Augustus Herman Pettibone enlisted as a private in the Union Army in 1861 and rose to the rank of Major in the 20th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment. After the war, he practiced law in Greenville, Tennessee and served in various other judicial positions for the State of Tennessee. He was elected to Congress in 1880 where he served for six years, and subsequently served in the TN House of Representatives for two years. Pettibone died in 1905 in Nashville. Condition: Overall excellent condition with handle having a couple of old tight breaks. [See more photos →]

$8,190.00
Lot 188: Early Dave Pottery Jar, signed 1840 Early Dave Pottery Jar, signed 1840 Lot 188: Early Dave Pottery Jar, signed 1840

Attributed to David “Dave” Drake, an early dated alkaline-glazed stoneware jar, incised across the front shoulder “April 3, 1840 LM” for Lewis Miles’ Stony Bluff Manufactory, Edgefield District, South Carolina; the reverse side with two incised slash marks. Ovoid jar with flared rim and lug handles, approximately 5-6 gallons in capacity. 13 1/2″ H x 12 1/4″ diameter at widest part. A typical form employed by the enslaved but literate African-American potter David Drake and one of his earliest pieces to surface, dating from the first year in which he was owned by Lewis Miles (1840-1843). Provenance: Estate of Lorraine Griffin of Moultrie, GA; descended through her family. CONDITION: Old 2″ chip to rim and 1″ chip to underside of one handle. Tight 6″ hairline extending from rim through date inscription. 2 1/4″ hairline to rim on other side. Overall crazing to glaze; a few scattered chips, abrasions and/or firing flaws to sides, up to 1″ diameter. [See more photos →]

$7,920.00
Lot 100: Greene County, Tennessee redware jar attributed to C A Haun Greene County, Tennessee redware jar attributed to C A Haun Lot 100: Greene County, Tennessee redware jar attributed to C A Haun

Southern redware jar, copper oxide slip over lead glaze, attributed to Christopher Alexander Haun. Provenance – descended in the family of James H. Bright, Greene County, Tennessee. Condition – minor chips to base, minor flakes to glaze. 6 3/8″ height. Second quarter of the 19th century. This jar has a similar form to a marked “C A Haun” jar with copper oxide glaze. [See more photos →]

$7,762.00
Lot 131: East TN  Redware Pitcher East TN Redware Pitcher Lot 131: East TN  Redware Pitcher

East Tennessee miniature redware teapot or pitcher, tall straight sides, with sine wave incising and incised lines around body and spout. Made by the Mort pottery family of Jefferson County, TN. Condition – Very tight hairline starting at mid-section and ending at base, minor flakes to rim and spout. 8 15/16″ H x 10″ W. Mid 19th century. Note – similar pottery forms and sherds attributed to the Mort pottery of Jefferson Co., TN can be viewed in the current “Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware Made in East Tennessee 1800-1900” exhibit curated by Carole Carpenter Wahler through October 30, 2011 at the Museum of East Tennessee History, Knoxville. [See more photos →]

$6,900.00
Lot 289: SW VA Cobalt Decorated Stoneware Pottery Jug SW VA Cobalt Decorated Stoneware Pottery Jug Lot 289: SW VA Cobalt Decorated Stoneware Pottery Jug

Washington County, Virginia cobalt decorated stoneware jug depicting the side profile of a man with muttonchop sideburns, possibly Vestal pottery. Very good condition overall with old hairline crack in neck extending to mid-section. 11 1/4″ H. Mid 19th century. Provenance: Found in Washington County. The handle, rim, and flared base are typical of early stoneware forms from the Southwest Virginia area. [See more photos →]

$6,670.00
Lot 139: East TN Earthenware Pottery Jar East TN Earthenware Pottery Jar Lot 139: East TN Earthenware Pottery Jar

Large East Tennessee earthenware jar, ovoid form with incised lines around the shoulder, extruded handles terminating in thumbprints, base with a beaded foot. Attributed to Greene County, Tennessee. 12 3/4″ H. 19th century. Note: For an example of a similar earthenware jar, refer to the article, “Earthenware Potters Along the Great Road in Virginia and Tennessee”, J. Roderick Moore, Antiques Magazine, September 1983, p. 532, plate IV. [See more photos →]

$6,608.00
Lot 178: Monumental Ten Gallon Daniel Seagle Pottery Stoneware Jar Monumental Ten Gallon Daniel Seagle Pottery Stoneware Jar Lot 178: Monumental Ten Gallon Daniel Seagle Pottery Stoneware Jar

North Carolina Daniel Seagle (1805-1867) ten (10) gallon alkaline glaze pottery storage jar. Ovoid form with lug handles and slightly rolled rim, dark olive alkaline glaze. Stamped on one handle "DS" for Daniel Seagle and "10" on one handle denoting capacity. 17 3/4" H x approx. 16 1/2" dia. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. Note: Daniel Seagle's family were early settlers in Lincoln County, North Carolina, arriving from Pennsylvania in the late eighteenth-century. Daniel Seagle (1805-1867) made both lead-glazed earthenware and alkaline-glazed stoneware, although very few of his earthenware pieces have survived. He likely trained under his father, Adam, who would have made lead-glazed earthenware. The kiln of Daniel Seagle was excavated in the winter of 1987-1988 by archaelogist Linda Carnes-McNaughton (source: MESDA archives). CONDITION: Overall very good condition with a 1 1/8" hairline across top surface of the rim edge. Approx 3/4" chip to one handle, minor glaze exfoliation to the rim. [See more photos →]

$6,600.00
Lot 156: C A Haun Redware Pottery Jug, Greene County, TN C A Haun Redware Pottery Jug, Greene County, TN Lot 156: C A Haun Redware Pottery Jug, Greene County, TN

East Tennessee, Greene County, earthenware pottery jug by Christopher Alexander Haun (1821-1861), Greene County, Tennessee. This is the only known marked jug example, with one row of stamping on the shoulder including the letters "C A Haun" and star or sunburst stamp, with a green copper oxide glaze. 8 1/4" H. Historical Note: Christopher Alexander Haun was a Union sympathizer during the Civil War and participated in burning a Confederate railroad bridge (Lick Creek) in Greene County, TN. This important event in East Tennessee's Civil War history was initiated with a campaign by Union loyalists to burn 9 bridges. It was led by William B. Carter and strongly supported and encouraged by President Abraham Lincoln. Several potters from the Pottertown, TN area were among the men who conspired and succeeded in burning the bridge. The potters decided not to capture or kill the Confederate bridge guards but allowed them to go free based upon their solemn promises to not reveal their identities. Union troops did not materialize as promised, and the Confederates were able to pursue and capture some of the perpetrators. The Confederate guards, who were allowed to live, were the very ones who served as witnesses to implicate the five men who were hung, four of them potters. Among those sentenced to hang was the potter Christopher Alexander Haun. In his last hours, Haun wrote to his wife and said "have Bohanan, Hinshaw or Low to finish off that ware and do the best you can with it for your support". On December 11th, 1861, Haun was hung from the gallows in Knoxville, TN. CONDITION: Handle missing, some scattered losses to glaze. Losses to lower body. [See more photos →]

$6,600.00
Lot 189: Lewis Miles Edgefield Pottery Jar, Signed & Dated 1857 Lewis Miles Edgefield Pottery Jar, Signed & Dated 1857 Lot 189: Lewis Miles Edgefield Pottery Jar, Signed & Dated 1857

Lewis Miles Pottery, Edgefield, South Carolina stoneware pottery jar with an olive colored alkaline glaze, ovoid form with two lug handles, deep incised initial signature on the shoulder "L. M." and dated March 12, 1857 below the rim with four additional punch marks (denoting capacity) and two incised slash marks to the left of the initials. 13 7/8" H x 40" circumferance. Mid 19th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. Note: This jar originally sold in 2002 at the Southern Folk Pottery Collectors Society auction from the Collection of George & Shirley Plaster, page 118 of the catalog. CONDITION: Very slight nicks to one handle. According to the 2002 Southern Folk Pottery Collectors Society auction catalog, the base of the jar was restored with a glossy finish for preference, not due to any condition issues with the original base (now covered with a glossy surface). [See more photos →]

$6,144.00
Lot 404: NC Southern Pottery Face Jug, H. F. Reinhardt NC Southern Pottery Face Jug, H. F. Reinhardt Lot 404: NC Southern Pottery Face Jug, H. F. Reinhardt

Harvey Ford Reinhardt (Vale, Lincoln County, North Carolina, 1912-1960) alkaline glazed folk art pottery face jug, stamped "H. F. Reinhardt Vale, NC" along the lower backside edge. Depicted with large ears and eyes, straight short mustache, an open mouth with ceramic teeth, and a single pulled handle. 7 1/2" H x 7 1/2" dia. 1st half 20th century. Note: a similar face jug form stamped "H. F. Reinhardt Vale N.C." was sold in our January 25, 2020 sale, lot 174. CONDITION: Scattered firing flaws including one above one eyebrow and two flanking the handle. Chip to one ear and losses to back edges on both. Minor losses to handle terminus. [See more photos →]

$5,376.00
Lot 150: George Dunn Pottery Jar, Signed & Dated George Dunn Pottery Jar, Signed & Dated Lot 150: George Dunn Pottery Jar, Signed & Dated

Middle Tennessee stoneware two-handled pottery jar or urn, signed “George Dunn, The Potter” and dated “Nov., 2, 1875”. Wide base rim signed with the initials “W.L.D.” Green/brown glazed jar with grey stoneware color lower section, opposing strap handles terminating in curled points (“rat tail”). Possibly by George Washington Dunn (1870-1944). 11″ H x approx 9″ W. Note: According to Sam Smith and Stephen Rogers reference, there was a George A. Dunn from White Co. who died in 1875 (p. 663, Volume 2 of “Tennessee Potteries, Pots, and Potters, 1790s-1950) but whether this jar is noting the death date of this potter is unknown. A similar urn form with the inscription for G. W. Dunn is illustrated on page 387 of the same book. Condition: Chip to backside edge of rim, tip of rat tail terminal of right handle broken. [See more photos →]

$5,192.00
Lot 174: NC Southern Pottery Face Jug, H. F. Reinhardt NC Southern Pottery Face Jug, H. F. Reinhardt Lot 174: NC Southern Pottery Face Jug, H. F. Reinhardt

Harvey Ford Reinhardt (Vale, Lincoln County, North Carolina, 1912-1960) alkaline glazed folk art pottery face jug, stamped “H. F. Reinhardt/Vale, NC” along the lower backside edge. Depicted with large ears and eyes, mustache and an open mouth with ceramic teeth, pulled handle. Some scattered rutile drips. 6 3/4″ H. Early 20th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. See: Turners and Burners: The Folk Pottery of NC by Charles G. Zug III, page 277, Figure 9-4. CONDITION: A couple of small chips to back edge of ears, chips to base of handle. Overall craquelure to glaze. [See more photos →]

$5,040.00
Lot 157: NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, One Gallon NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, One Gallon Lot 157: NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, One Gallon

North Carolina, Catawba Valley, stoneware pottery jug or saddle jug, ovoid form with two flattened sides, dark brown alakaline glaze, and one strap handle. Upper shoulder beneath spout with incised initials "D S" for Daniel Seagle (1805-1867) and a "1" denoting capacity. 11 1/2" H. Mid 19th Century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Some minor scattered firing flaws, overall very good condition. [See more photos →]

$5,040.00
Lot 406: Moravian Green Glazed Pottery Chicken Moravian Green Glazed Pottery Chicken Lot 406: Moravian Green Glazed Pottery Chicken

North Carolina Moravian earthenware caster in the form of a chicken with an overall green glaze, incised feather and eye decoration, 9 small openings below the beak and a molded comb and feet, all on an integral domed base. 4 1/8" H x 4" L. Note: An original 1891 letter accompanies this lot. The 77 year old writer, C. M. Witt, recalls this piece belonging to his grandmother, Elizabeth Horner (b. Jefferson County, TN 1838 – d. Whitesburg/Hamblen County, TN 1916), who used it as a "pepper shaker". Old label reading "98" on underside of chicken corresponds to a similar numbering system used on an inventory list created by Joseph Feamster Taylor (1892-1965) of Whitesburg, TN, son of Franklin Walter Taylor (1854-1919), grandson of Franklin William Taylor (1810-1897), great grandson of Lieutenant William Graham (1786-1857), the owner of the Early TN Militia coat in Lot 608, and father of Joseph Franklin Taylor (1934-2015), (as referenced on a powder horn, also in this sale). According to the book "The Moravian Potters in North Carolina", Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1972 by John Bivens, Jr., Moravian earthenware forms were probably being sold in frontier stores from Wytheville, Virginia to the Watauga settlement of East Tennessee (p.21, Bivens). Provenance: Descended in the consignor's family. Estate of Anne Harrison Taylor & Joseph F. Taylor, Morristown, TN. CONDITION: Old repaired break to base of chicken body where it joins the base. Scattered losses to glaze and scattered fleabites. [See more photos →]

$4,800.00
Lot 148: East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar Lot 148: East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar

East Tennessee, possibly Knox County, stoneware pottery small lidded jar, with 3 deeply incised lines around the shoulder. Upper body with impressed semi-circle stamp "W. Grinstaff" for William Grindstaff, with a sideways "1" underneath and backwards "S" in the name stamp. 6 1/4" H with lid. Late 19th century. Note: This jar was featured in the 1996 "Tennessee Turned: Earthenware and Stoneware Made in East Tennessee 1800-1900" East Tennessee Historical Society exhibition. CONDITION: Excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$4,560.00
Lot 159: Southwest VA Stoneware Pitcher, Cobalt Decoration, Exhibited Southwest VA Stoneware Pitcher, Cobalt Decoration, Exhibited Lot 159: Southwest VA Stoneware Pitcher, Cobalt Decoration, Exhibited

Small Washington County, Virginia stoneware pitcher with elaborate cobalt floral decoration to the body and cobalt decoration to the spout and neck. 6 3/4" H x 4" dia. 2nd half of the 19th century. Provenance: Brad Swanson Collection, Abingdon, VA. Note: This pitcher was exhibited in the "Legacy in Clay: Pottery of Washington County, Virginia" 2005 exhibit, William King Regional Arts Center, Abingdon, VA. It was also illustrated in the "Legacy in Clay" museum exhibit catalog and in the book, "Great Road Style: The Decorative Arts Legacy of Southwest Virginia & Northeast Tennessee", Betsy K. White, University of Virginia, page 147, figure 134. CONDITION: Chip to inside edge of rim. [See more photos →]

$4,320.00
Lot 129: East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar Lot 129: East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar

Large East Tennessee William Grindstaff double handle stoneware pottery jar, stamped ìW. Grindstaffî and three additional ì2? stamps on shoulder, possibly denoting gallon capacity of 6 gallons. Two incised lines around circumference of shoulder and glaze drips extending from one handle and around rim to midsection of jar. 20? Height. Late 19th century with a Blount County, Tennessee history. Condition: Overall excellent condition. Condition: Overall excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$4,248.00
Lot 504: Nonconnah Mugs and Tankard, 5 items Nonconnah Mugs and Tankard, 5 items Lot 504: Nonconnah Mugs and Tankard, 5 items

Rare Tennessee Nonconnah art pottery cameo pitcher or tankard and four (4) handled mugs, 5 items total, each with applied cameo dogwood flower and branch decoration on a matte green glaze and brown glazed interior. Bases with slip signatures "Nonconnah". Pitcher – 11-1/2" H. Mugs – 6- 1/4" H. Circa 1915. Provenance: Private West Tennessee Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. One mug with glaze flake or pop at upper edge, 1/3", possibly in the making. Pitcher has 2" x 1/2" area of whitish abrasions to side. All with wear to undersides. Note one mug has a matte interior with 5" glaze drip. No hairlines or cracks. [See more photos →]

$3,840.00
Lot 160: SC Edgefield Pottery Jug w/ Slip Flower Design SC Edgefield Pottery Jug w/ Slip Flower Design Lot 160: SC Edgefield Pottery Jug w/ Slip Flower Design

South Carolina Edgefield District alkaline glaze pottery storage jar with slip decorated flower and 5 (denoting gallon capacity) to the upper shoulder on both sides. 16 3/4" H x 12" dia. Mid 19th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Chip to underside of one handle, some scattered firing flaws, otherwise overall good condition. [See more photos →]

$3,456.00
Lot 177: NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, Two Gallons NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, Two Gallons Lot 177: NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, Two Gallons

North Carolina Daniel Seagle (1805-1867) alkaline glazed stoneware pottery jug, ovoid form with brown alkaline glaze, and one strap handle, incised lines below the neck rim. Upper shoulder beneath spout with incised initials "D S" for Daniel Seagle and a "2" denoting capacity. 14 1/4" H. Mid-19th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Some surface scratching noted to left side of stamps, a couple of shallow chips to left side of handle. [See more photos →]

$3,240.00
Lot 167: East TN Grindstaff Stoneware Pottery Jar East TN Grindstaff Stoneware Pottery Jar Lot 167: East TN Grindstaff Stoneware Pottery Jar

East Tennessee, Blount or Knox County, stoneware pottery preserving jar, with 2 incised lines around the shoulder. Lower base with impressed stamp "W. Grinstaff" for William Grindstaff with an additional "cross" symbol incorporated into the stamp. Additionally stamped with an impressed "1" above, denoting capacity. 7 3/4" H. Late 19th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition, minor fleabites to rim. [See more photos →]

$3,240.00
Lot 191: Decorated Edgefield, SC Stoneware Jar Decorated Edgefield, SC Stoneware Jar Lot 191: Decorated Edgefield, SC Stoneware Jar

Edgefield, South Carolina decorated stoneware jar, possibly Chandler pottery. Ovoid form with crescent lug handles and olive/brown alkaline glaze, Both sides decorated in iron slip with a "broken stem flower" design. 13 1/4" H. Second quarter of the 19th century. CONDITION: Overall very good condition with some minor scattered expected glaze wear and glaze imperfections to body, primarily below flower decoration on both sides. [See more photos →]

$3,120.00
Lot 155: NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, 3 Gallon NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, 3 Gallon Lot 155: NC Stamped Daniel Seagle Pottery Jug, 3 Gallon

North Carolina, Catawba Valley, stoneware pottery jug, ovoid form with brown alakaline glaze, and one strap handle, incised lines below the spout. Upper shoulder beneath spout with incised initials "D S" for Daniel Seagle (1805-1867) and a "3" denoting capacity. 15" H. Mid 19th Century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Minor fleabites to rim, some minor firing flaws to body, overall good condition. [See more photos →]

$2,880.00
Lot 149: Middle TN Dunn Pottery Pitcher, Signed & Dated Middle TN Dunn Pottery Pitcher, Signed & Dated Lot 149: Middle TN Dunn Pottery Pitcher, Signed & Dated

Middle Tennessee stoneware pottery pitcher, attributed to the Dunn pottery family working in the Putnam, White and DeKalb counties. Signed and dated in script, "J L Dunn/1887" along the upper mid-section with incised line below and incised line around the neck. Dark brown glaze with band of orange/light brown glaze to center. 9" H. Late 19th century/Early 20th century. CONDITION: Old chipping to rim, 2 hairlines across width of base visible from the interior, otherwise overall good condition. [See more photos →]

$2,760.00
Lot 270: Historical Staffordshire Liverpool Pitcher, Apotheosis of Washington Historical Staffordshire Liverpool Pitcher, Apotheosis of Washington Lot 270: Historical Staffordshire Liverpool Pitcher, Apotheosis of Washington

Historical Staffordshire Liverpool commemorative transfer decorated creamware pitcher depicting the Apotheosis of Washington to one side, after the print by John James Barralet (Pennsylvania, 1747-1815); an American maritime ship bearing a US 16-star flag to the other side; and the "chicken leg" Eagle Seal of the United States beneath the spout. Rim, spout, body and base with hand painted gilt decoration including floral sprigs, swags, and highlights. Red museum deaccession number along the lower edge. 11 1/2" H x 11 1/2" W. Late 18th/early 19th century. Note: Pitchers such as this were made to commemorate the death of President George Washington in 1799. The Apotheosis of Washington scene depicts him being raised from his tomb by two winged figures representing Immortality and Father Time. At the left are allegorical figures of Faith, Hope, and Charity above a spread winged bald eagle perched on the US shield with a banner reading "E Pluribus Unum" in its beak. Below Washington is an allegorical figure of Liberty and a Native American (representing the Western Hemisphere) seated among Washington's armor, sword, and a fasces–iconography of his military and political career. (Courtesy of The Smithsonian Natural Museum of American History). Provenance: Previously deaccessioned from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, East Tennessee collection. CONDITION: Overall good condition, no apparent repairs noted under UV inspection. Scattered wear and losses to applied gilt decoration. [See more photos →]

$2,760.00
Lot 172: Southern Blue Painted Folk Pottery Face Jug Southern Blue Painted Folk Pottery Face Jug Lot 172: Southern Blue Painted Folk Pottery Face Jug

Southern folk art pottery face jug attributed to James Otto Brown (Georgia/South Carolina, 1899-1980) stoneware folk art face jug, having a brown-green glaze with grey-blue applied paint and applied strap handle. Depicted with flared nostrils, moustache and double row china teeth. 8" H. 20th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition with expected exfoliation of later grey-blue paint to one side. Firing lines noted around one ear. [See more photos →]

$2,760.00
Lot 149: East TN Grindstaff Double Handled Jar East TN Grindstaff Double Handled Jar Lot 149: East TN Grindstaff Double Handled Jar

East Tennessee, possibly Knox County, salt glazed stoneware pottery double handled jar, one-gallon capacity mark. Impressed semi-circle stamp "W. Grinstaff" for William Grindstaff, with a "1" below the rim. 11 1/4" H. Late 19th century. CONDITION: Large chip to rim and several deep pock marks/areas of loss to body of jar. [See more photos →]

$2,520.00
Lot 145: East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar Lot 145: East TN William Grindstaff Stamped Jar

East Tennessee, Blount or Knox County, stoneware pottery preserving jar, with 2 incised lines around the shoulder. Upper body with impressed semi-circle stamp "W. Grinstaff" for William Grindstaff, with an impressed "2" above denoting capacity. 10 5/8" H. Late 19th century. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. [See more photos →]

$2,520.00