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Folk Art Highlights

Below are examples of exceptional results for Folk Art auctioned by Case Antiques, Inc. The sold price includes the Buyer’s Premium. If you have items like these in an estate, a private collection, or a museum, and would like to sell them, visit our selling page to learn more about consigning. We appreciate your interest!

If you are interested in consigning items of this quality for future auctions, please contact us at info@caseantiques.com.
(Note: Prices realized include a buyer's premium.)

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Lot 615: Andrew Clemens Sand Art Bottle Andrew Clemens Sand Art Bottle Lot 615: Andrew Clemens Sand Art Bottle

Andrew Clemens (American, 1857-1894) patriotic sand art bottle, dated 1889. Glass bottle with round flat-top stopper and a tall cylindrical body filled with multicolored, layered sand in decorative stripe, swag and diamond patterns, one side with vignette of a spread-winged eagle a 36-star American flag, the alternate side with a detailed floral vignette including forget-me-nots, rose and pansy, enclosing a date of 1889. Height 6 5/8″. Provenance: the estate of Stanley Horn, Nashville, Tennessee, by descent in his family to current consignor. Note: Andrew Clemens was born in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1857 and later moved to the town of MacGregor. At the age of five, he contracted an illness (possibly encephalitis) which caused him to become deaf and mute. He attended the Iowa School for the Deaf. As an adult, he began working with sand from the naturally colored sandstone in the Pictured Rocks area of Iowa to form detailed pictures in glass bottles. Clemens created his designs using self-made tools including “brushes” of tiny hickory twigs; no glue was used. The bottles were well received by the public – particularly riverboat travelers to MacGregor, seeking souvenirs – and he was able to earn a livelihood selling sand art bottles until his death in 1894 at the age of 37. While many were sold, few have remained intact over the years. (Source: the Des Moines Register). PRE-APPROVAL IS REQUIRED TO BID ON THIS LOT. PLEASE CONTACT CASE ANTIQUES, INC. AT THE KNOXVILLE GALLERY FOR DETAILS. 865-558-3033 or BID@CASEANTIQUES.COM. CONDITION: Stopper is original with 1/8″ chip and 2 short hairlines to edge (these do not extend through (stable)). [See more photos →]

$66,000.00
Lot 60A: Exceptional Franklin, Tennessee sampler, 1836 Lot 60A: Exceptional Franklin, Tennessee sampler, 1836 Lot 60A: Exceptional Franklin, Tennessee sampler, 1836
Important Franklin, Tennessee house sampler by Mary Elizabeth Collins, April 1836. This sampler relates to a group of four documented samplers from Middle TN. The group is referred to as the “Cartouche, Wreath, and Vase Group”. This specific sampler contains nine different stitching techniques and the baskets are characteristic of Middle Tennessee samplers from the early 1830s to the late 1850s (research courtesy of Jennifer C. Core, Tennessee Sampler Survey). Condition – 5th row of letters show deterioration. Some missing linen to top right edge. Framed – 19 7/8″ height x 19 6/8″ width. Sight – 16 5/8″ height x 16 1/2″ width. Note: Sampler has been photographed and documented by the Tennessee Sampler Survey.

[See more photos →]

$30,000.00
Lot 439: 19th C. Bird’s Eye View, Univ. of Virginia and Charlottesville from Lewis Mountain 19th C. Bird’s Eye View, Univ. of Virginia and Charlottesville from Lewis Mountain Lot 439: 19th C. Bird’s Eye View, Univ. of Virginia and Charlottesville from Lewis Mountain

Mid-19th century birdseye view of the Charlottesville, Virginia, area, graphite on cardstock, titled on two separate caption strips in faint period hand-written pencil script: THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA / CHARLOTTESVILLE AND MONTICELLO IN THE BACKGROUND / TAKEN FROM LEWIS MOUNTAIN. The panoramic view shows the Lawn of the original grounds of the University of Virginia, including the Annex to the Rotunda (constructed 1851-54, destroyed by fire in 1895), and the Anatomical Theater (completed in 1828, partially destroyed by fire in 1886, restored with modifications in 1888). The town of Charlottesville and Monticello Mountain are visible in the background. Unsigned. The drawing shows numerous similarities, and is possibly related, to the lithograph of the same subject and title drawn by Edward Sachse (1804-1873) of Sachse & Co. and published by Casimir Bohn in 1856, although it lacks several details (including the horses seen in the upper right foreground of the print). Sachse & Co. was responsible for several mid-19th century views of American towns including: Richmond, VA (1851), Norfolk, VA (1851), and Alexandria, VA (1854). Other artists drawing views of Virginia during the period included James T. Palmatary, John Serz (who also did an engraving of the University of Virginia for Bohn), Edward Beyer and David Hunter Strother. Housed in an early, possibly original silver-gilt molded wood frame; framing materials include square nails. Sketch – 11″ H x 18″ W. Sight – 11 7/8″ H x 17 7/8″ W. Framed – 15 1/4″ H x 21″ W. Provenance: Nashville, Tennessee, estate, descended in an early Charlottesville, Virginia, family. CONDITION: The drawing itself is in overall good condition with some minor losses upper margin, primarily at corners, and edge toning. Significant toning and some dampstaining to paper below sketch, with significant fading to penciled writing on captions. Sketch and caption strips are not adhered to backing. Frame: shrinkage and scattered oxidation and wear to frame, losses to upper left corner, right center margin; retains much of original gilding. [See more photos →]

$18,560.00
Lot 220: 19th c. Watercolor View, Nashville from Ft. Negley 19th c. Watercolor View, Nashville from Ft. Negley Lot 220: 19th c. Watercolor View, Nashville from Ft. Negley

“Nashville Panorama,” an important and large circa 1880 watercolor view of the city of Nashville from Fort Negley (built during the Civil War by Union troops and freed slaves). Visible are many Nashville landmarks including the Tennessee State Capitol, the University of Nashville, Howard School, and the Cumberland River, along with churches, brick and log homes, various figures, horses and carriages. Unsigned, artist unknown. Titled NASHVILLE TENN. lower margin. 21″ x 36″ sight, 29″ x 42″ matted and framed. Published, “The Tennessee Historical Quarterly: Landscape and Genre Painting in Tennessee, 1810-1985″ by James C. Kelly, Tennessee Historical Society, 1985. Exhibited, The Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, Sept. 5-Nov. 20, 1985; Dixon Gallery, Memphis, Dec. 1-Jan. 15, 1986; Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, Feb. 6-March 31, 1986, and the Dulin Gallery of Art, Knoxville, April 10-May 11, 1986. Provenance: the estate of Sarah Hunter Hicks Green, formerly of Historic Devon Farm, Nashville, Tennessee. CONDITION: 15″ light water stain down center, a couple of 1/2” areas of discoloration in the sky, overall light toning and fading. Examination out of frame reveals margins present and watercolor is not mounted or glued down. Later frame. [See more photos →]

$17,980.00
Lot 138: SW Virginia Pie Safe Sideboard, Urn Tins SW Virginia Pie Safe Sideboard, Urn Tins Lot 138: SW Virginia Pie Safe Sideboard, Urn Tins

Southwest Virginia sideboard pie safe with tins having intricate punched urn, flower, and star designs, total of eight punched tin panels, all with old green paint. Walnut primary and poplar secondary. Rectangular top over one long drawer and two side drawers, all dovetailed; four paneled doors inset with painted tins; interior fitted with two shelves; solid paneled sides, all resting on short turned and tapered legs. 51 1/8″ H x 65 1/4″ W x 18 1/2″ D. Probably Washington County, VA. Third quarter of the 19th century. Provenance: Brad Swanson Collection, Abingdon, VA. CONDITION: Overall general wear, some warping to top, some of the wooden knobs worn, one missing. Crack to front left corner of top, wear and losses to upper corners of a couple of doors and drawers from use. Interior with later added support to accomodate more shelves. [See more photos →]

$17,920.00
Lot 84: Andrew Jackson parade lantern Andrew Jackson parade lantern Lot 84: Andrew Jackson parade lantern

Punched Tin Andrew Jackson parade lantern, cylindrical with domed top and handle, the punched design reading “Andrew Jackson Forever” across the body with ” Jan 8th 1832 ” across the top, surmounted by a row of stars. Exhibited Cheekwood Museum of Art, “Nashville Collects”, circa 1990. 13-1/2″ H x 5-1/4″ diameter. Provenance: estate of A. Welling LaGrone Jr., Nashville, Tenn., purchased from Sotheby’s (lot 762, unknown sale number/date). Note: Jan. 8, 1815 was the date associated with General Jackson’s victory in the Battle of New Orleans. This was likely a commemorative piece, possibly made around the time of his re-election. Condition: Lacks top handle, two small holes in base, 1 broken hinge with lost nail. [See more photos →]

$16,820.00
Lot 264: Knoxville, TN Sampler, I. Baker, 1848 Knoxville, TN Sampler, I. Baker, 1848 Lot 264: Knoxville, TN Sampler, I. Baker, 1848

Knoxville, Tennessee genealogical sampler, signed Isabella M. Baker, 1848; executed in silk needlework on linen, with floral vine border and stitched garden at lower edge; features three rows of upper case letters, one row of lower case letters and one row of numerals, plus seven geometric dividing bands, all sewn in eyelet, cross stitch and four-sided stitch. Center field contains marriage, birth and death information for Isabella’s parents, C.H. Baker and M.L. White, and family, 1831-1847. 23 3/4″ H x 24 1/2″ W unframed. Note: This sampler has been documented for the Tennessee Sampler Survey. The survey’s genealogical research found Isabella (Belle) McNutt Baker was born Oct. 30, 1836 in Knoxville, TN. Her parents were Caleb Hodnett Baker, Sr. and his second wife, Mary Lawson White. Through her mother, Isabella was the great-granddaughter of Gen. James White, the founder of Knoxville. Isabella was listed as a sophomore in the 1848-1849 catalog of the East Tennessee Female Institute, successor of the Knoxville Female Academy. As she was not listed in the catalog for 1847-48, it is not certain that she completed her sampler there. However, if she did, her embroidery teacher would have been Mrs. Mariah McAnally, wife of Rev. David R. McAnally, principal of the school. Isabella married Benjamin J. Stephenson, a druggist, in 1856 and gave birth to four children. She died in 1913 and is buried in the Old Gray Cemetery in Knoxville. (A copy of the Tennessee Sampler Survey genealogy report, including guide to initials on sampler, is available on request). Condition: Overall good condition with some fading and discoloration. 3/8″ x 1/2″ and 3/8″ x 3/8″ tears near upper right corner. CONDITION: Overall good condition with some fading and discoloration. 3/8″ x 1/2″ and 3/8″ x 3/8″ tears near upper right corner. [See more photos →]

$16,520.00
Lot 108: William Frye Portrait of an African American Man William Frye Portrait of an African American Man Lot 108: William Frye Portrait of an African American Man

George Wilhelm Frye, (Germany/Alabama, 1822-1872) oval oil on canvas painting of Southern historical interest, depicting a bearded African American man standing beside a posted newspaper, attired in a white shirt, red pants and suspenders, a straw hat and black boots. The subject holds a brush tinged with whitewash or white glue and a paint pail, and just behind him, on the wall, is posted the front page of the Louisville Commercial Newspaper (1869-1902). Signed lower left margin “W F”. Unframed. 26 3/4″ H x 21 3/4″ W. Exhibited, The Howard Steamboat Museum “Fall Into Art” exhibit, 2010. Provenance: Estate of Lynn Scholl Renau, Louisville, Kentucky. Note: Lynn Renau was awarded the Isaac Murphy Award for her groundbreaking research about slavery and African American history in Kentucky. This painting, which hung over her desk, was among her most prized pieces. Frye’s decision to title the newspaper “The Louisville Commercial” and give it such visual prominence is significant, especially when viewed beside his working class, African American subject. Founded by the DuPont family in 1870, The Louisville Commercial was the only Republican daily newspaper in Kentucky, and it also circulated in Southern Indiana and Middle and West Tennessee. According to one period description quoted in “Chronicling America,” “its rigorous exposure of corruption and wastefulness in municipal affairs has given it strong local popularity and influence; it is a favorite in families and with business men, and the saloons and gambling dens are bitterly hostile towards it.” Biderman DuPont, sole owner of the paper by 1874, had supported the Union cause and in an 1860 letter to his mother, wrote that “Slavery is a moral evil….” (source: Timothy J. Mullin, “The du Ponts in Kentucky,” DLSC Faculty Publications, Western Kentucky University, 2009). In an 1873 ad the newspaper boasted it had “met the Democratic papers at every point and exposed their misstatements” (American Newspaper Directory, Vol. 4). Biography: “George Wilhelm (William) Frye (1822-1872) was a portrait artist from Germany who established a studio in Huntsville, Madison County; he also painted in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee. His depictions of life in the western Black Belt of Alabama were important records of the antebellum period in the state. He also tutored future Alabama artist Maria Howard Weeden for two years. Historians are able to follow his career through court records and the newspaper advertisements Frye placed in Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee; several advertisements in Alabama newspapers announce his relocations. By 1845, Frye had settled in Louisville, Kentucky, where he painted portraits, and he opened a second studio in Huntsville by March 1847 while maintaining the Louisville location at least into 1848. On May 18, 1848, he married Virginia Hale in Hunstville; the couple would have four children. He became a U.S. citizen on August 29, 1854, in Madison County. During the next several years, Frye opened temporary studios in numerous locations around the South, including Memphis, Tennessee, and advertised his services there for four months in 1857. Frye’s growing reputation as a portrait painter prompted the Agricultural and Horticultural Society Fair of West Alabama to enlist him as a fine arts judge in 1859”. (Source: “The Encyclopedia of Alabama” by E. Bryding Adams). Alternate spelling George William Frey. CONDITION: Canvas is embrittled, loose from stretcher on right side, and stretcher creases evident at top and left sides. Right side has significant 21” L. vertical crease with loss and flaking and 8 perforations, largest 2” L. Left side with 3 perforations, largest 2” L. ?” L. tear center above male figure’s head. Various abrasions and scratches with loss, largest 1 ½” L. No inpainting or alterations detected with black light. [See more photos →]

$15,000.00
Lot 81: Charles Wysocki o/c, Windmill Charles Wysocki o/c, Windmill Lot 81: Charles Wysocki o/c, Windmill

Charles M. Wysocki (American, 1929-2002) oil on canvas painting, titled verso “Windmill,” of a country road winding through a New England village with windmill, barns, houses, horses and buggies, figures and animals. Signed lower right. Label en verso for Hirshl & Adler Galleries, New York. Birdseye maple frame with giltwood liner. 35″ x 35″ sight, 42″ x 42″ framed. Biography (Courtesy Askart: The Artists’ Bluebook): Charles Wysocki grew up in a Polish immigrant community in Detroit. He worked as a sign painter in the Army and, through the GI Bill, enrolled at the Art Center School of Design in Los Angeles. He began his career as a commercial artist, but during a vacation to New England in 1960, was inspired to pursue a career in fine art, focusing mainly on Americana scenes. Wysocki was named one of the ten most influential artists by U.S. Art and was awarded the Medal of Honor from the Daughters of the American Revolution for artwork that “exemplfies our heritage.” His paintings are in numerous public and private collections, including the Presidential art collection. Provenance: the collection of Stephen and Lisa Steiner Small, Nashville, Tennessee, ex-Hirshl & Adler Galleries, New York. Condition: Frame loose at top edge; shrinkage and some light abrasions to frame. Painting is in excellent condition. Condition: Frame loose at top edge; shrinkage and some light abrasions to frame. Painting is in excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$13,570.00
Lot 119: Cigar Store Indian Princess, Painted and Carved Cigar Store Indian Princess, Painted and Carved Lot 119: Cigar Store Indian Princess, Painted and Carved

Cigar Store Native American figure, carved and polychrome painted wooden likeness of an Indian princess or maiden with feathered headdress, her right arm holding a bundle of cigars while her extended left hand grasps a package of tobacco. Resting on a wooden platform with two steel rod supports. 67″ x 24″ x 14 1/2″ height. Early 20th century. Provenance: Gatlinburg, TN collection. Condition: Old losses and separations to Indian maiden figure, two steel rods support base at lower waist, blacklighting does not indicate paint restoration or repair. [See more photos →]

$12,980.00
Lot 82: William A. Walker Oil on Board William A. Walker Oil on Board Lot 82: William A. Walker Oil on Board

William Aiken Walker (American/South Carolina, 1838-1921) oil on board Southern genre scene, depicting a cabin with an African American family on the porch and road with chickens in the foreground. An orange tree is pictured to the right of the cabin, and clothes hang from a laundry line in the background. Later frame. Signed lower left “W. A. Walker”. Sight 5 7/8″ H x 11 3/4″ W, Framed 10 7/8″ H x 16 7/8″ W. Biography (courtesy Askart: The Artists’ Bluebook): the son of a prominent cotton agent, Charleston-born Walker exhibited his first painting at the South Carolina Institute Fair at the age of 12. He went to Dusseldorf to study art in 1860 but returned to American and served as a cartographer for the Confederacy during the Civil War. Walker is primarily known for his scenes of plantations, African -Americans, and dock scenes. Some were commissioned by wealthy patrons; others were turned out as souvenirs of the Old South for the tourist trade. Currier and Ives published several of his works as lithographs. From 1876-1905, Walker lived in New Orleans, where he and Everett B.D. Fabino Julio tried to establish an Art League. Their attempts, although initially unsuccessful, the project led to what would become the Southern Art Union. Provenance: acquired from the estate of Dr. George Compton of Tipton, Indiana in the early 1990s; by oral history, acquired by the Compton family directly from the artist in the early 20th century. Condition: Overall excellent condition. Condition: Overall excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$12,390.00
Lot 131: Tennessee Needlework House Sampler, Harriet Bryant Tennessee Needlework House Sampler, Harriet Bryant Lot 131: Tennessee Needlework House Sampler, Harriet Bryant

Middle Tennessee needlework sampler, silk on linen, signed “H.D. Bryant’s Work”, with house, tree, and basket or urn motifs. Attributed to Maury County (Culleoka), circa 1835. Wide lily or tulip and geometric outer border and an inner chain of diamond border, enclosing upper and lower case cross-stitched alphabets (lacking lower case d) and numerals, over the signature line which is executed in four-sided stitch. Dividing bands are stitched in geometric and floral motifs in cross, back, chain, and queen stitches. The lower half of the sampler is devoted to large figural motifs of a two-story house, tree with two birds, and a basket of fruit or flowers. This highly decorative sampler, worked in tones of blue, dark and light green, white and beige/gold, is similar to other Middle Tennessee samplers classified by the Tennessee Sampler Survey as the “Cartouche, Wreath and Vase Group” (see the Mary Elizabeth Collins sampler sold by this auction house in Dec. 2008). Provenance: according to the Tennessee Sampler Survey, which has documented this sampler, it was made by Harriet Daniel Bryant. Harriet was born in North Carolina to Edward Bryant and his second wife Elizabeth (Betsy) Amis. Sometime between 1818 and 1823 the family moved to the Culleoka area of Maury Co. where the sampler was made. Harriet married Archelous White in Maury County in 1841 and they had nine children. It descended in her family to the present consignor. Older but not original giltwood frame. Sight: 17″H x 17-1/2″W. Framed: 19″ H x 19-1/2″W. Condition: Overall very good condition with some light fading and discoloration but no thread or ground loss. Sampler is currently framed with an acidic background but is not glued down. The blue thread in the outer border does not continue through the lower right corner but there is no indication of thread loss. Later frame but possibly original glass. [See more photos →]

$11,600.00
Lot 659: West Tennessee Sampler, 1837, Mary Jane Russell West Tennessee Sampler, 1837, Mary Jane Russell Lot 659: West Tennessee Sampler, 1837, Mary Jane Russell

Scarce West Tennessee needlework sampler, silk on linen, by Mary Jane Russell of Brownsville TN, Haywood County, 1837, with unusually comprehensive biographical information. Multicolored border comprised of eyelet stitch on one side and cross stitched zig zag pattern on top, and cross-stitched green and white chainlink pattern on right side, enclosing 2 rows of upper case alphabets (cross and eyelet stitches), and 1 of lowercase alphabets plus 2 rows of numbers. Note: this sampler has been documented by the Tennessee Sampler Survey. It is one of only about ten documented samplers from West Tennessee, and the only known Tennessee sampler which contains the stitcher’s birthplace (Orange County, North Carolina, Feb. 3, 1825 – indicative of the migratory pattern of early Tennessee settlers as they advanced to the Western wilderness). Sampler also includes Russell’s birthdate, Feb. 3, 1825, along with her home location of Brownsville and sampler date, “Nov the 2. 1837.” According to genealogical information from the Tennessee Sampler Survey, Mary Jane Russell came from NC to Haywood County, Tennessee in 1826 with her parents, James W. Russell and Nancy Brewer. There was a Brownsville Academy in the community by 1831 (which may have been co-ed), and Mary Jane may have made her sampler there. Records obtained by the Tennessee Sampler Survey show her father fell behind on his payments there in 1833 and 1834 and was sued by the Board of Common School Commissions. Mary Jane may also have been instructed by her aunt, Mrs. W.C. Russell, who was a teacher in the county. Sometime after 1840, Mary Jane, her parents, and several siblings moved to Texas. She married Stephen Decatur Rainey there in 1847 and they had three children. She died in Harrison County, Texas in 1898 and is buried in Marshall Cemetery. A packet of genealogical information will be provided to the winning bidder on request. Old, possibly original lemon gilt molded frame. Sight: 10 3/4″ H x 17 1/2″ W. Framed: 4 3/4″ H x 21 1/2″ W. CONDITION: 3/4″ area of repair above first letter C, 1/2″ area of repair upper center edge above letter F, a few other scattered small areas of ground loss/holes, discoloration/toning and fading throughout. Sampler has not been examined out of frame. [See more photos →]

$10,880.00
Lot 181: Salem, North Carolina Theorem on Velvet, Circa 1820 Salem, North Carolina Theorem on Velvet, Circa 1820 Lot 181: Salem, North Carolina Theorem on Velvet, Circa 1820

Early 19th century schoolgirl landscape theorem on velvet, depicting a large building with bell tower set atop a hill. It and several smaller buildings overlook a river, with three men in a boat loaded with barrels sailing past. Old note taped verso reads “For Minerva Evans Hoge. Painted by Minerva French Boyd while a student at the Moravian College in Winston Salem N.C. about the year 1820 – her great-great aunt.” Later giltwood and composition molded frame with brown mat. 12″ x 16″ sight, 21″ x 24″ framed. Also included is a framed copy of an 1865 presidential pardon, granted by Andrew Johnson to another ancestor of Minerva Hoge, Joseph H. Hoge of Giles County, Virginia, for his participation in “the late rebellion against the government of the United States.” 19″ x 30″, framed. Note: upon leaving school in Salem, Minerva French married Col. Thomas Jefferson Boyd of Albemarle County, Virginia, the law partner of her brother-in-law Judge David McComas. The couple lived in Evansham, Va., and Thomas Boyd helped lay out the town which would eventually come to be called Wytheville; in fact he became known as “The Father of Wytheville” due to his civic involvement (source: the Thomas Jefferson Boyd papers, Special Collections, Louisiana State University). Thomas and Minerva had several children, including David French Boyd, who moved to Louisiana and founded Louisiana State University. (Their son Thomas Duckett Boyd also served as President of that University). The scene depicted in the theorem has not been identified. It may show a building familiar to Minerva French which no longer exists, or may have been drawn from a print of the period depicting a faraway location. Condition: Velvet is adhered to acidic paperboard stock, which has caused some overall discoloration. Scattered tiny stains and areas of wear/loss. Losses to molding on frame. [See more photos →]

$10,800.00
Lot 35: Southern Landscape, View of Cumberland Gap Southern Landscape, View of Cumberland Gap Lot 35: Southern Landscape, View of Cumberland Gap

Southern landscape painting, oil on canvas, depicting a view of Cumberland Gap with mountains and log structures. Signed “O.M. ’97” lower left. The painting depicts the evacuation of the Cumberland Gap by the 7th Division of the Army of the Ohio. The Cumberland Gap was occupied by the Confederates until June of 1862. The Union Army then occupied the gap until September, 17th 1863. It is believed that the house in the foreground was the headquarters of Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird of the 27th brigade with the tents surrounding the home belonging to the 14th Kentucky infantry. It is likely that the painting is based off of a Civil War era print. Sight – 21 1/4″ H x 26 7/8″ W. Framed – 26 1/4″ H x 32″ W. Late 19th century. Provenance: Collection of Grace Tankersley, Knoxville, TN., purchased from Carole Wahler. Condition: Cleaned with later frame, blacklighting did not reveal any inpainting or repairs. [See more photos →]

$9,976.00
Lot 231: Franklin Boggs O/C Country Landscape Franklin Boggs O/C Country Landscape Lot 231: Franklin Boggs O/C Country Landscape

Franklin Boggs (1914-2009) oil on canvas countryside landscape, likely Tennessee, depicting a gathering of farmers, women and children, engaged in various farming activities including baling hay, pouring grain into bags and talking. Barn to left of scene with horses, chickens and pigs and farm equipment present. Signed lower right and dated ’42. Housed in the original Knaffl & Brothers, Knoxville, TN stained wood frame. Sight – 29 1/4″ H x 39 1/4″ W. Framed – 33 1/2″ H x 43 1/2″ W. Biography: A painter, sculptor and muralist, Franklin Boggs received his art education at the Fort Wayne Art School and Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. He was awarded two European Traveling Fellowships and was in Europe at the outbreak of the war in 1939. Boggs began his art career by recording the activities of the Tennessee Valley Authority and painting murals for the U.S. Post Office. He became a war artist-correspondent for Abbott Laboratories early in 1944 and documented the work of the Army Medical Department in the South Pacific. After the war, Boggs was commissioned to paint in South America and became a full professor and artist-in-residence at Beloit College, where he continued his work as a muralist. His works have been exhibited in many leading U.S. museums including the Metropolitan, Corcoran, Legion of honor and Chicago Art Institute. His murals are in eight states and two are in Finland (Courtesy: PBS). CONDITION: Small area of craquelure, upper mid margin, otherwise overall very good condition. Frame with light general wear. [See more photos →]

$9,600.00
Lot 193: Wilhelm Eilerts Landscape with Hunting Dogs Wilhelm Eilerts Landscape with Hunting Dogs Lot 193: Wilhelm Eilerts Landscape with Hunting Dogs

Wilhelm Theodore Eilerts (Kentucky, late 19th Century) oil on canvas painting of two setters on point in a field with a mountainous background. Signed “W Th Eilerts 1882″ in lower right. Unframed. 20 1/8″ H x 26” W. Note: Wilhelm Eilerts was an artist working in central Kentucky in the late 19th century. Little is known about his background or training, but much of his known work consists of sporting and equine subjects rendered in a folky manner. Provenance: Private Nashville, Tennessee collection. Condition: Overall very good condition. Minimal paint loss around the edges, on new stretcher. [See more photos →]

$9,280.00
Lot 139: Portrait miniature of child with book, American School Portrait miniature of child with book, American School Lot 139: Portrait miniature of child with book, American School

American School miniature portrait, watercolor on ivory, unsigned. Subject is a child with brown hair in a dark dress with white ruffle collar, holding a book. Mounted in gold metal case, very good condition with dust/lint visible inside the case, plating on case shows some flaking, no visible cracks or losses to paint. 2-1/8″ H x 1-3/4″ W. American, early 19th century. Provenance: Pigeon Forge, TN Collection. [See more photos →]

$8,960.00
Lot 112: Folk Art Portrait of a Child, TN History Folk Art Portrait of a Child, TN History Lot 112: Folk Art Portrait of a Child, TN History

Folk art painting on canvas, depicting a little girl with brown eyes and ringlets, wearing a triple strand coral necklace and lace dress with red sash, seated in a red painted chair with yellow trim, and holding fruit. 28″ x 19 1/2″ unframed. Provenance: Painting has descended in the Moran family of Woodland Farm in Williamson County, TN, which included the cabinetmaker Charles Moran. Charles Moran was born in Gates, North Carolina in 1794 and established a cabinetmaking shop in Franklin, Tennessee circa 1820. The subject is unknown, as is the painter. CONDITION: Original canvas, attached to original stretcher with square nails; a strip of faux leather has been applied with round nails around the perimeter of the stretcher edge, with 10″ strip missing along the top edge. Less than a dozen tiny pinprick sized holes to canvas affecting finger, neck, collar, sleeve and chair, with remaining holes in background. 2″ scratch across bridge of nose, and a 1/8″ flake to lip. 1″ scuff line at center left edge of canvas. General overall surface grime and darkening. Black light reveals no inpainting or alterations. [See more photos →]

$8,640.00
Lot 121: Clementine Hunter O/B, Picking Flowers or Uncle Tom's Cabin Clementine Hunter O/B, Picking Flowers or Uncle Tom's Cabin Lot 121: Clementine Hunter O/B, Picking Flowers or Uncle Tom's Cabin

Clementine Reuben Hunter (Louisiana, 1886-1988) early oil on canvasboard folk art farm scene titled "Picking Flowers", variant of her common theme, Uncle Tom's Cabin, circa 1960s. Painting depicts a man with white beard, "Uncle Tom," and young "Eliza" in a bright yellow dress with red hair ribbons, tending to and picking flowers around the base of a birdhouse on pole foreground; large white goose and vegetable garden lower left; "Simon Legree" with whip and dogs upper left; cabin lower right background, blackbirds flying above right. Monogram signature lower right. Labels en verso for Knoke Gallery (Atlanta, GA); canvas is also stamped "F.L. (Doc) Spellmon, Artist, Black Art Studio Ltd. San Antonio TX" with hand inscription "(Collection) T.O. see file Wilford Healy from Louisiana." Housed in a carved dark wood frame with gilt painted wood liner. Sight – 17 1/2" H x 23 3/8" W. Framed – 23 1/2" H x 29 1/4" W. Note: we wish to thank Thomas Whitehead for confirming the authenticity of this painting. Provenance: Private Southern Collection, ex-Knoke Galleries, Atlanta. Biography: A self-taught artist, Clementine Hunter created bright, whimsical folk paintings depicting life in and around the Melrose cotton plantation where she lived and worked, near Natchitoches, Louisiana. She did not start painting until her 50s. She used whatever surfaces she could find, and, working from memory, recorded everyday life, from work in the cotton fields to baptisms and funerals. She rendered her figures, usually black, in expressionless profile and disregarded formal perspective and scale. Though she first exhibited in 1949, Hunter did not garner public attention until the 1970s when both the Museum of American Folk Art in New York and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art exhibited her paintings. Even with such success, Hunter chose to stay in Louisiana, working at Melrose Plantation until 1970 when she moved to a small trailer a few miles away on an unmarked road. (source: The National Museum of Women in the Arts). CONDITION: Painting in overall very good condition. Wood frame with minor general wear. [See more photos →]

$8,400.00
Lot 174: Kentucky Oil on Canvas, Wilhelm T. Eilerts Kentucky Oil on Canvas, Wilhelm T. Eilerts Lot 174: Kentucky Oil on Canvas, Wilhelm T. Eilerts

Wilhelm Theodore Eilerts (Kentucky, late 19th Century) large oil on canvas of cows gathered under a tree with nearby stream. Signed lower right margin and dated “1886”. Housed in the original carved and molded gilt and gesso wood frame (with later added paint). Sight – 32″ H x 59″ W. Framed – 43 1/4″ H x 89 3/4″ W.Note: Wilhelm Eilerts was an artist working in central Kentucky in the late 19th century. Little is known about his background or training, but much of his known work consists of sporting and equine subjects rendered in a folky manner. Provenance: Found in the home of Jason Walker of Richmond, KY, built around 1865. Condition: Inpainted tear running a horizontal line in largest cloud, scattered losses to lower middle and right margin edge, tear to upper right sky (approx. 1 1/2″), frame with later gold paint. [See more photos →]

$7,316.00
Lot 591: Tennessee Sampler, Henley Family, Knox County Tennessee Sampler, Henley Family, Knox County Lot 591: Tennessee Sampler, Henley Family, Knox County

Tennessee needlework Family Register sampler, worked 1830 by Elizabeth M. Henley at the Knoxville Female Academy. Elizabeth Henley, granddaughter of Revolutionary War hero Col. David Henley, married Barclay McGhee, grandson of Knoxville settler and politician Col. Charles McClung. Silk on linen sampler with wide floral border, partially unfinished, with zig zag design satin stitch edging in contrasting light and dark threads, enclosing three rows of cross-stitched alphabet, the date 1830 and a row of numbers, over a bud and heart-with-cross motif band, over two verses: “Teach me to feel another’s woe/To hide the fault I see/that Mercy to others show /that mercy show to me” and “When age shall steal on me and youth is no more/and the moralist Time shakes his glass at my door/What charm in lost beauty or wealth shall find/my treasure my wealth is a sweet peace of mind”. Below the side by side verses is Elizabeth M. Henley’s signature and a family register with names and birth dates of her father, Arthur H. Henley, born Nov. 15, 1782; mother Ann E. Henley born Sept. 29, 1798, and siblings and/or possibly cousins: Sally H. Henley, born Feb. 20, 1816; David Henley, born Oct. 5, 1816; Mary K. Henley born Nov. 16, 1820; Alexander S. Henley born Nov. 15, 1822; and Mildred W. Henley (no birth date stated). Housed under glass in an early 20th century stained molded wood frame. 17 1/2″ H x 21 3/4″ W sight; 19 1/2″ H x 23 3/4″ W framed. Note: This sampler has been documented by the Tennessee Sampler Survey ( a copy of this report will accompany the sampler). Elizabeth Henley was born 1819 in Monroe County, Tennesssee to Arthur and Ann Henley. Her grandfather on her father’s side, David Henley, was a Continental Army officer during the American Revolutionary War, who served as George Washington’s intelligence chief and prisoner of war commandant. He later served as the Agent for the United States War Department for the Southwest Territory (later Tennessee) in the 1790s. Elizabeth’s name appears in the Knoxville Female Academy catalog for 1831 along with that of her sister Mary, and may have been worked while she was attending this school in Knox County, or at the Bolivar Academy in Madisonville, Monroe Co. as it bears a resemblence to other samplers made there at that time, according to the Tennessee Sampler Survey. Sadly, Elizabeth did not live long enough to reach the old age to which she alluded in her verse. She married Barclay McGhee in 1843 and died the following year at the age of 25, twelve days after the birth of their daughter. Barclay McGhee was the son of John Charles McGhee and Elizabeth Betsy Jones McClung McGhee (daughter of Knoxville settler and surveyor Colonel Charles McClung (1761-1835); he also was known as the master of land his family owned on the prehistoric Native American site in Monroe County called Toqua. Three years after Elizabeth’s death, Barclay married her sister Mary (whose name appears on the sampler). In 1856, at the age of 32, Barclay was found dead in a Chattanooga hotel room with a slit throat! Period accounts leave it unclear as to whether his wounds were self inflicted or the result of a deadly feud with a neighbor. Provenance: The Living Estate of Elizabeth Johnston Davidson Frierson, Knoxville, TN. CONDITION: Sampler has not been fully removed from frame but appears glued to cardboard backing. Overall discoloration to ground and fading to thread. Two significant areas of staining, 2″ diameter center right and 4″ diameter center left, other scattered minor spots of darker discoloration throughout. No apparent holes or significant losses, although the names Alexander and Mildred appear to have possibly been reinforced with darker thread or added later. [See more photos →]

$7,200.00
Lot 165: Tennessee Needlework Sampler 1839, Roxana McGee Tennessee Needlework Sampler 1839, Roxana McGee Lot 165: Tennessee Needlework Sampler 1839, Roxana McGee

Franklin / Williamson County, TN silk-on-linen needlework sampler by Roxana McGee. Worked in cream, light and dark green, yellow, black, brown and red silk threads in a variety of stitches including cross, chain, eyelet and satin. Floral garland border on three sides surrounding seven text registers, including 5 alphabetic bands above the identifying register, “Roxana M’Gee’s sampler/Franklin, Tenn august, 1839,” and a verse: “May I govern my passions with absolute sway/ And grow wiser and better as life wears away”. Below is a central vase of fruit flanked on either side by wreaths, dated “1793” and “1799”. Later stained wood frame. Sight – 16″ H x 16 1/4″ W. Framed – 20 5/8″ H x 21″ W. Note: This sampler has been documented by the Tennessee Sampler Survey, which attributes it to the “Vase and Cartouche” group of Middle Tennessee samplers. Roxana’s grandfather was Rev. John McGee who owned a large land grant near Henpeck Lane, south of Carnton Plantation (Williamson County, TN). His home, Mendenhall, still stands. Roxana’s father was a physician who died young leaving her mother with six children in 1832. Roxana (B. circa 1825) married William Cole (B. circa 1813 in NC) in Williamson County in 1842. Shortly after marrying, they moved to Tippah County, Missouri and later to Pueblo, Colorado. Illustrated “19th Century Williamson County Samplers: Emerging Research” by Jennifer Core, Williamson County Historical Journal, No. 43, 2012 (pp. 26-27). Provenance: Private Tennessee collection; Christie’s New York auction of Important American Furniture, Folk Art and Decorative Arts (Mr. J. Hays, sale #7980), Oct. 21, 1994, Lot #4; the collection of Katherine Prentiss Murphy. Condition: Overall very good condition with some light overall background discoloration and thread fading, archival framing under UV-resistant glass. [See more photos →]

$7,020.00
Lot 105: Helen LaFrance, Church Picnic Helen LaFrance, Church Picnic Lot 105: Helen LaFrance, Church Picnic

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, b. 1919) oil on canvas landscape painting depicting a Church Picnic, with automobiles parked in front of a church and horse and buggy approaching lower left; a table is being spread in the right middle ground while little girls play a circle game in the right foreground. Signed lower right. Housed in a giltwood molded frame. Sight – 17 1/2″ H x 23 1/2″ W. Framed – 23″ H x 29″ W. Biography: “Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings” – drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home”. (Source: “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses). Alternate spelling: Helen La France. CONDITION: Excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$6,240.00
Lot 638: Kentucky 1832 House Sampler, Eliza Pearson Kentucky 1832 House Sampler, Eliza Pearson Lot 638: Kentucky 1832 House Sampler, Eliza Pearson

Kentucky Needlework Sampler stitched by Eliza Pearson and dated 1832, silk on coarse weave linen in colors of red, navy blue, green, brown/tan and ivory. “Eliza Pearson Aged 9 1832” stitched into 5 rows of alphabets and numbers, each row separated by a band of cross stitch in colorful and decorative motifs, over a verse: “O God permit thy gracious name to stand as the first ephod (sic for “effort”) of a female hand/And while her hand doth on the canvass move engage her youthful heart to seek thy love”. Large red multiple story house at lower center, flanked by urns of flowers; plain cross stitched border. Housed in a period wide ogee molded stained wood frame with gilt rabbet edge having a framing label verso for The Art Shop, Louisville, KY. 15″ x 11 3/4″ sight, 23″ x 20″ framed. Accompanied by a packet of genealogical information for Eliza A. Pearson, b. 1823 in Nelson County, KY (in an area which later became part of Hardin County). She married William Franklin in 1852 and had at least three children. She died in 1912 in Nelson County. CONDITION: Most colors remain bright, with some fading to tans and greens, 1/4″ area of ground loss at center possibly affecting the W in “While”, some small losses to various navy blue lettering on verse, overall ground discoloration. Frame has original surface with 1/2″ spots of veneer loss at each lower corner. Not examined out of frame. [See more photos →]

$6,144.00
Lot 172: Texas Horn Chair attrib. Charles Puppe Texas Horn Chair attrib. Charles Puppe Lot 172: Texas Horn Chair attrib. Charles Puppe

Texas horn armchair with cattle hide seat covering and glass ball casters. Unsigned, attributed to Charles Puppe of San Antonio, circa 1889. 37″ H x 31″ W x 21″ D. Note: information recently furnished to us by Alan Rogers of the National Texas Longhorn Museum suggests this chair was made by Charles Puppe, based on the arrangement and placement of the horns which is similar, but not identical to the No. 6 Chair by Wenzel Friedrich (1827-1902), also of San Antonio (to whom we initially attributed this chair). Friedrich and Puppe both used glass ball casters on the feet of their horn chairs, but the placement of the four longer horns making up the bottom back of the chair, with the middle two touching, suggests it was in fact made by Puppe; it is identical to a documented chair Puppe made in 1889 for rancher Dennis Martin O’Connor, who in turn gave it to President Benjamin Harrison. Charles Puppe had a shop at 229 Commerce Street in San Antonio. He first appears in city directories as a maker of horn chairs in 1885 and is listed as late as 1891. Provenance: A.R. Dickey Estate, Knoxville, TN. Condition: Overall very good condition with expected wear. Hide covering possibly not original. [See more photos →]

$5,904.00
Lot 646: Gee’s Bend Quilt, Bettie B. Seltzer Gee’s Bend Quilt, Bettie B. Seltzer Lot 646: Gee’s Bend Quilt, Bettie B. Seltzer

Gee’s Bend Alabama pieced quilt by Bettie Bendolph Seltzer (1939 – 2017), house-top pattern variation stitched in bright colors including yellow, red, purple, aqua and green. Signed en verso to one corner “Bettie B. Seltzer” and additionally stamped “Gee’s Bend Quilters Collective”. 86 1/4″ x 84 1/2″. Alabama, 20th century. CONDITION: Excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$5,632.00
Lot 155: Exhibited African-American Schoolhouse Quilt Exhibited African-American Schoolhouse Quilt Lot 155: Exhibited African-American Schoolhouse Quilt

Southern African-American quilt, attributed to Margaret or Lema Carr of Rogersville, Tennessee, recently exhibited at Colonial Williamsburg. This quilt displays an ingenious and unique design by incorporating the traditional Schoolhouse pattern with a semi-abstract Tree of Life motif, using hand-stitched pieced and appliqued cotton and synthetic fabrics. Eight rectangular panels enclose multicolored schoolhouses with beads representing door knobs and embroidered flowers, facing each other; the “roofs” and panel borders are joined by a central green vertical “tree trunk” to become its limbs, with all enclosed within a mauve border. Off white cotton backing. 78 1/2″ x 63 1/2″. Early to mid 20th century. Provenance: According to family tradition, Margaret Carr (born ca. 1909), an African-American schoolteacher from Rogersville, Tennessee, made the quilt or inherited it from her mother. Margaret appears in the 1940 United States census from Hawkins County, Tennessee when she was 31 years old and living on North Church Street with her parents George and Lema Carr. Although she had completed four years of college, Margaret was working as a cook in a private home at the time of that census. Margaret also taught at Swift University in Rogersville, Tennessee. She remained single until at least 1971, when the local Rogersville Review newspaper reported that Miss Margaret Carr hosted a meeting of the Woman’s Home and Foreign Missionary Society of Russell Chapel Church at her home on Church Street. Russell Chapel was an African Methodist Episcopal Church. (source: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation). Provenance: the collection of Mary Jo Case, Kingsport, Tennessee. Exhibited, “A Century of African-American Quilts,” McCarl Gallery of the Art Museums at Colonial Williamsburg, February, 2017, to June of 2018. CONDITION: Overall good condition. Scattered areas of staining/discoloration. 3/8″ area of shattering, top right. Two schoolhouses, second from top on right and bottom on left, are missing doorknob beads. Velcro band for display across top of quilt backing. [See more photos →]

$5,600.00
Lot 290: Rare Maury Co. TN Figural Sampler Rare Maury Co. TN Figural Sampler Lot 290: Rare Maury Co. TN Figural Sampler

Important Maury County, Tennessee needlework sampler, silk on linen, signed Margaret A. Reaves and dated 1830. Sampler features a floral border enclosing 3 alphabets and 1 row of numbers, over a double tombstone panel center. At left are stitched figures of a man and woman in fine clothing, in profile on either side a tree with bird perched in its branches. At right is an urn of flowers. Below is a stitched verse, “Here orange trees with blooms and pendants shine / and vernal honours to their autum join / exceed their promise in the ripend store / yet in the rising blossoms promise more / State of Tennessee Maury County / Margaret A. Reaves sampler 1830″. Sampler has been stitched to a tan mat and framed under glass. Sampler: 13″ x 10 1/4″; later giltwood frame: 16 1/2″ x 14”. Sampler has been documented by the Tennessee Sampler Survey, which noted “This elaborate sampler is unique among Tennessee samplers for its mastery of difficult stitches and unusual couple and tree motif. Margaret’s expert stitching included cross, cross over one, bullion knot, buttonhole wheel, eyelet, four-sided, hem, pattern darning, queen, rice, satin, and stem.” A genealogy report accompanies the sampler, and additional genealogy information is included on the back of the frame. Exhibited, “Middle Tennessee Samplers: This My Name Shall Ever Have,” Polk Presidential Hall, Dec. 17-April 10, 2011. Private Middle Tennessee collection. CONDITION: Overall fading; staining to lower 1/3 of sampler; about a half dozen small holes to right side of sampler along border and next to the date 1830 (largest is 3/4″L). Possible old thread repair to lowermost row of stitches (below the word County). Sampler is not glued down. [See more photos →]

$5,192.00
Lot 101: Southern Folk Art Portrait of a Girl Southern Folk Art Portrait of a Girl Lot 101: Southern Folk Art Portrait of a Girl

Oil on canvas folk art portrait of a dark haired girl, believed to be Annie Eliza Tomkins Harrison of Sumner County, Tennessee (b. 1831-d. 1878). The subject is depicted wearing a green high waisted dress with pouf sleeves and gold locket around her neck, and is posed slightly turned to her left, with her left arm resting on a table and a book. Housed in a simple cove molded gilt wood frame. Sight – 24 1/2" H x 20 1/2" W. Framed – 28 1/2" H x 24 1/2" W. Circa 1845. Provenance: descended in the Tomkins family of Sumner County, Tennessee family to present consignor. Eliza Tomkins, also spelled Tompkins in some references, was the daughter of Mary Henderson Madden Tomkins (1811-1846) and John Randolph Augustus Tomkins (1800-1879), a prominent landowner, militia captain, merchant and civic leader. Mr. Tomkins was also a trustee of the Sumner Female Academy. Eliza was the couple's only daughter and seems to have lived in Sumner County all her life. She married W.A. Harrison, a Presbyterian minister in Gallatin. The portrait descended to the consignor through one of Eliza's four brothers, Dr. William R. Tomkins (1837-1887). The artist is unknown and may have been an itinerant painter passing through the area. CONDITION: Original canvas with light to moderate craquelure and stretcher creases. See black light image: significant inpainting and overpainting to left side sleeve and arm as well as girl's face and neck. Patterned marking above book on sitter's right evident with black light. Professionally cleaned. [See more photos →]

$5,040.00
Lot 88: Helen LaFrance Oil on Panel, Church Scene Helen LaFrance Oil on Panel, Church Scene Lot 88: Helen LaFrance Oil on Panel, Church Scene

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, b. 1919) oil on panel painting depicting an African-American congregation outside of a church, sheltered behind several large trees, with figures gathering around a white cloth covered table laden with food in the background. Other figures, arriving from automobiles, in the foreground. Signed lower right. Housed in a gilt and black painted wooden frame with linen rabbet edge. Sight – 15 3/4″ H x 32″ W. Framed – 20 3/4″ H x 37 1/4″ W. American, late 20th century. Provenance: Private Nashville, TN collection. Biography: Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings”, drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home. (source: “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses). Alternate spelling: Helen La France. CONDITION: Overall good condition with areas of cracquelure, natural imperfections to wood panel. Stains to linen rabbet edge. [See more photos →]

$5,040.00
Lot 300: Attr. Ralph Cahoon, Folk Art Sailor Painting Attr. Ralph Cahoon, Folk Art Sailor Painting Lot 300: Attr. Ralph Cahoon, Folk Art Sailor Painting

Attributed to Ralph Eugene Cahoon (American, 1910-1982), gouache, pencil and possibly oil folk art painting on board, possibly a study, depicting whalers in two rowboats attempting to harpoon a whale with water being expelled from its blowhole; a whaling vessel sails near the shoreline in the background. Signed lower right "R. Cahoon". Pencil inscription en verso reading "To our Fran (sic?) Brad from Ralph C__ & Martha Ives" along with illegible numbers. Housed in a simple carved wood frame with wood liner. Sight – 22" H x 29 1/2" W. Framed – 26" H x 34" W. Circa late 1950s. Provenance: found in the Minnesota estate of American art collectors, who acquired it in the Northeast. Biography: Ralph Cahoon was born in Cape Cod and enjoyed a lifetime love of sailing and painting maritime scenes. He studied fine and graphic art at Boston's School of Practical Art. After marrying his wife Martha Farnham Cahoon (1905-1999), the couple made a name for themselves restoring, paint-decorating and selling antique furniture. They eventually transitioned to easel painting, first using plywood and later, masonite. Their individual styles were very similar, primarily pastel in tone, using greens, soft pinks, grays, and browns, with no attempt to use light or shade to create a third dimension. Mermaids became a hallmark of Ralph's style in the 1960s. Source: Michael David Zellman," 300 Years of American Art." CONDITION: Overall light grime to painting. Some toning and staining en verso. [See more photos →]

$4,864.00
Lot 126: Helen LaFrance O/C, Children Sleeping Helen LaFrance O/C, Children Sleeping Lot 126: Helen LaFrance O/C, Children Sleeping

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, b. 1919) oil on canvas painting depicting the interior of a bedroom in an African American home, with vivid floral wall paper and two large and colorful quilt-covered beds, one containing three boys, awake and the other containing two girls, asleep; a woman, presumably their mother, is visible ironing clothes through a doorway to the left, and a kitchen with an old fashioned oven can be seen through a doorway to the right. Signed lower right and housed in a simple wood frame. Sight – 17 1/2″ H x 35 1/2″ W. Framed – 21″ H x 38 5/8″ W. American, late 20th century. Biography: Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings”, drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home. (source: “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses). Alternate spelling: Helen La France. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. [See more photos →]

$4,608.00
Lot 125: Thornton Dial Folk Art Watercolor, Toll Bridge Thornton Dial Folk Art Watercolor, Toll Bridge Lot 125: Thornton Dial Folk Art Watercolor, Toll Bridge

Thornton Dial (Alabama, 1928-2016) folk art mixed media on paper painting (charcoal, graphite, vinyl paint, watercolor and colored pencils on paper), titled "Toll Bridge" depicting faces on both sides of a diaphanous, abstract bridge over bright blue water, with a small tiger figure in center of bridge. Signed with initials "TD" lower right. Handwritten note reading "Toll Bridge:/If you got to cross the waters,/you got to pay the toll./1992" attached en verso. Float mounted and matted under glass in a silvered molded frame with gadroon carving. Sight – 29 1/2" H x 41 31/2" W. Framed – 40" H x 52" W. American, late 20th century. Illustrated, "Thornton Dial: Image of the Tiger", New Line Books, 2003, page 151. Biography: Thornton Dial Sr. was born into poverty in a rural town in West Alabama. Sometimes known as "Buck" Dial, he became a "jack-of-all-trades", doing mainly iron work and cement work to support himself and his family, while creating assemblages on the side from castoff materials. Fellow self taught artist, Lonnie Holley, brought Dial's work to the attention of art world in 1987 by introducing him to collector Bill Arnett. Arnett championed Dial's works and facilitated his involvement in museum shows, where his two and three-dimensional works began drawing comparisons to Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. In 1993, "Thornton Dial: Image of the Tiger" became the artist's first major solo museum exhibition of the 65-year-old African American painter. Organized by guest curator, Thomas McEvilley, this exhibition was presented at the Museum of American Folk Art and The New Museum. In the fall of 2005, the Houston Fine Arts Museum hosted a show, "Thornton Dial in the 21st Century". Dial's works have been acquired by the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the American Folk Art Museum, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia, the de Young Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2014. (source: The New York Times obituary, Jan. 26, 2016 and The Souls Grown Deep Foundation). Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition with waviness to paper. Not examined outside of frame. [See more photos →]

$4,560.00
Lot 655: Helen LaFrance, O/B, Farm Scene Helen LaFrance, O/B, Farm Scene Lot 655: Helen LaFrance, O/B, Farm Scene

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, b. 1919) oil on plywood paneling board landscape, depicting a farm with multiple figures and animals. A woman in sunbonnet with two children and a cat step along a path leading past a clothesline and flower garden to a frame house surrounded by trees. In the background is a large barn with wagon, donkeys, and cattle in front. Signed lower right and dated ’88. 24″ x 35 5/8″ sight, 26″ x 37 1/2″ framed. Provenance: Consignor was related to the artist by marriage and acquired this painting directly from the artist. Alternate spelling: Helen La France. CONDITION: Some darkening/grime to varnish layer, particularly visible in sky area; two extraneous 1/8″ white paint drips to upper and lower right quadrants, 3″ abrasion to lower right quadrant along road, two 1/2″ scratches to paint near right edge (near fence), 4″ area of light exfoliation along right frame edge in trees. [See more photos →]

$4,350.00
Lot 336: Helen LaFrance, O/C, Country Church Helen LaFrance, O/C, Country Church Lot 336: Helen LaFrance, O/C, Country Church

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, born 1919) oil on canvas painting depicting an outdoor African-American country church scene. Signed and dated -98, lower right. Housed in a gilded contemporary frame. Sight – 15″ H x 19″ W. Framed – 24 1/2″ H x 28 1/2″ W. American, late 20th century. Biography (courtesy “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses): Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings” – drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home. CONDITION: Excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$4,320.00
Lot 46: Signed and dated 1827 Tennessee Sampler Signed and dated 1827 Tennessee Sampler Lot 46: Signed and dated 1827 Tennessee Sampler

Rare and relatively early Tennessee needlework sampler, silk on linen, signed Margaret D. Robinson, “Aprile th 14″ (sic), 1827. Wide floral border enclosing three upper case alphabets rendered in four-sided stitch, eyelet stitch, and cross stitch plus a lower case alphabet in cross stitch, a row of numbers and 9 geometric dividing bands. Later molded oak frame. This sampler has been documented by the Tennessee Sampler Survey as part of the Green and Pink Group of samplers made in the area of Sumner, Smith, DeKalb, and Wilson Counties in Middle Tennessee. Provenance: The consignor purchased the sampler at the estate sale of Dorothy Wilson Robinson Clark on May 31, 1986 in McMinnville, Warren Co., TN. The sampler descended in the family of Dorothy’s first husband, Alton Robinson (born in DeKalb County). A copy of the full TSS report and genealogical information will be made available to the winning bidder. 15 -1/2″ x 17-1/4″ sight, 18″ x 20” framed. Condition: Sampler is stitched (not glued) to cardboard backing. Overall good condition with general fading and discoloration, water stain in lower right hand corner. No holes but a small possible area of very early repair on the eyelet alphabet [See more photos →]

$3,944.00
Lot 189: Helen LaFrance painting, Circus Parade Helen LaFrance painting, Circus Parade Lot 189: Helen LaFrance painting, Circus Parade

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, b. 1919) large oil on canvas folk art / outsider art painting, titled en verso “Circus Parade,” signed lower right and dated ’95. The landscape depicts an elephant- and horse-drawn circus train traveling past a farm as bystanders watch in the distance. 24″ x 47-1/2″ sight, 26″ x 50″ framed. Biography (courtesy “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses): Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings” – drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home. Provenance: the collection of Stephen and Lisa Steiner Small, Nashville, Tennessee. Condition: Excellent condition. Condition: Excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$3,509.00
Lot 55: Exceptional carved folk art mold, dated 1831 Exceptional carved folk art mold, dated 1831 Lot 55: Exceptional carved folk art mold, dated 1831
Exceptional and rare Southern folk art carved mold, found in Wythe County, Virginia, dated 1831. Exceptional textured gouge carving, creating a level of detail and perception of depth indicative of a master carver. Circular mold consisting of hexagonal star with flower designs between points, outer circular border consisting of gouged carved date of “1831” and the initials, “C S” with a cross between the initials, carved hearts between flower with vine and leaves. Condition – Very good condition with minor chips to outer border, old age crack in area near “1” of 1831 date, back of mold original fitted for a handle now lost. 4 3/16″ x 4 1/16″ x 1 3/8″ depth. Circa 1831.

[See more photos →]

$3,422.00
Lot 107: Helen LaFrance, O/C, "Laundry Day," exhibited Helen LaFrance, O/C, "Laundry Day," exhibited Lot 107: Helen LaFrance, O/C, "Laundry Day," exhibited

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, born 1919) oil on canvas painting titled “Laundry Day,” landscape depicting two quilts hanging on a clothes line and a woman stiring the contents of a large kettle. Signed and dated “78” lower right. Exhibition label with title and medium and label with alternate title “On the Farm”, en verso (exhibited, Tennessee State Museum, “Helen LaFrance: Folk Art Memories,” July 1-August 12, 2012). Housed in a contemporary wooden frame. Sight – 21 1/2″ H x 27 1/2″ W. Framed – 24 3/4″ H x 30 3/4″ W. American, late 20th century. Alternate spelling: Helen La France. Biography: “Self-taught African American artist Helen La France was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings” – drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home”. (Source: “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses). CONDITION: Overall excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$3,240.00
Lot 388: Clementine Hunter, Wash Day Clementine Hunter, Wash Day Lot 388: Clementine Hunter, Wash Day

Clementine Reuben Hunter (Louisiana, 1886-1988) oil on canvasboard folk art painting titled "Wash Day" depicting a figure seated in a chair, presumably doing laundry against a brighty colored abstract background, rendered in impasto style. Monogram signature lower right. Pencil inscription en verso with artist's name, title, and date "12/7/85" with "age 99". Additional date of Feb. 1986 inscribed in marker along with B-223. Housed in a wooden frame. Sight – 13 1/2" H x 17 1/2" W. Framed – 16 1/4" H x 20 1/4" W. Note: we wish to thank Thomas Whitehead for confirming the authenticity of this painting. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. [See more photos →]

$3,120.00
Lot 160: Helen Bullard Folk Sculpture Collage Helen Bullard Folk Sculpture Collage Lot 160: Helen Bullard Folk Sculpture Collage

Helen Bullard Kreckniak (1902-1996, Ozone, Tennessee, working 1949-1982) folk art carved sculpture collage titled “Does Anyone Know What Comes Next?” and dated Nov. 7, 1969. Comprised of fifteen carved faces, both male and female, mounted on pine board and pegged walnut frame. Faces carved from chestnut, white pine, African mahogany, horse chestnut, and walnut (listed on the back). Differences in the carved facial features suggests the artist is making a reference to race and the integration movement of the time. 27 3/4″ H x 18 3/4″ W x 2″ D. Biography (Courtesy of East TN State University: Archives of Appalachia): Helen Bullard Kreckniak was an Appalachian artist, who specialized in carving and was known for her wooden dolls. She authored the 1977 publication, Crafts and Craftsmen of the Tennessee Mountains. Bullard was accepted into the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild in 1951. The Tennessee State Museum displayed an exhibit of Bullard’s primitive chestnut sculptures in Nashville in 1972. CONDITION: Overall very good condition with some general light wear. [See more photos →]

$3,068.00
Lot 338: Helen La France, O/C, Laundry Day Helen La France, O/C, Laundry Day Lot 338: Helen La France, O/C, Laundry Day

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, born 1919) oil on canvas painting titled Laundry Day. Signed, lower right. Titled, en verso. Housed in a contemporary woden frame. Sight – 18″ H x 36″ W. Framed – 19 1/4″ H x 37 1/4″ W. American, late 20th century. Biography (courtesy “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses): Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings” – drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home. CONDITION: Overall excellent condition. A few light minor scattered scuffs, largest 1/2″, top right quadrant of painting. [See more photos →]

$2,880.00
Lot 106: Helen LaFrance, O/C, "The General Store" Helen LaFrance, O/C, "The General Store" Lot 106: Helen LaFrance, O/C, "The General Store"

Helen LaFrance (Kentucky, born 1919) oil on canvas painting titled “The General Store”, landscape depicting figures in early automobiles and horse drawn buggies in front of a General Store. Signed lower right. Titled, en verso. Housed in a contemporary wooden frame. Sight – 18″ H x 24″ W. Framed – 19 3/8″ H x 25 1/2″ W. American, late 20th century. Biography: “Self-taught African American artist Helen LaFrance was born on a Kentucky farm and began painting in her 40s. She is known for her “memory paintings” – drawn from her recollections of life growing up in the rural South. Several museums and private collectors, including Oprah Winfrey, own examples of her work. Now nearly 100 years old, she resides in a Kentucky nursing home”. (Source: “Helen LaFrance Folk Art Memories” by Kathy Moses). Alternate spelling: Helen La France. CONDITION: Overall excellent condition. [See more photos →]

$2,880.00
Lot 124: Clementine Hunter O/B Nativity Scene, Children with Flowers Clementine Hunter O/B Nativity Scene, Children with Flowers Lot 124: Clementine Hunter O/B Nativity Scene, Children with Flowers

Clementine Reuben Hunter (Louisiana, 1886-1988) oil on canvasboard folk art painting, Southern "Nativity" or "Mary with Child" scene, depicting with young girls in brightly colored dresses bringing flower bouquets to Mary and child Jesus, seated under a tree; house in the background and thin band of sky at top, over a light pink background. Monogram signature lower right. Housed in a molded wood frame with linen matte. Sight – 13 1/2" H x 17 1/4" W. Framed – 17 1/2" H x 21 1/2" W. American, circa 1980. Note: we wish to thank Thomas Whitehead for confirming the authenticity of this painting. Provenance: Private Southern Collection. CONDITION: Some minor flaking upper left corner, abrasions lower right corner. Frame with scattered abrasions and wear. [See more photos →]

$2,560.00