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Militaria, Weapons, and Civil War Highlights

Below are examples of exceptional results for Militaria, Weapons, and Civil War items auctioned by Case Antiques, Inc. The sold price includes the Buyer’s Premium. If you have items like these in an estate, a private collection, or a museum, and would like to sell them, visit our selling page to learn more about consigning. We appreciate your interest!

If you are interested in consigning items of this quality for future auctions, please contact us at info@caseantiques.com.
(Note: Prices realized include a buyer's premium.)

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Lot 404: .38 Colt Model 1902 Pistol, Bonnie & Clyde .38 Colt Model 1902 Pistol, Bonnie & Clyde Lot 404: .38 Colt Model 1902 Pistol, Bonnie & Clyde

Model 1902 Colt, serial number 7362, found enfolded into the outlaw Bonnie Parker’s skirt at the Conger Funeral Home embalming room of Arcadia, LA in 1934. Letter of authentication dated 5/15/1972, signed by James Lavelle Wade (Sept. 28, 1886 – Dec. 17th, 1972), coroner in charge of the “Bonnie & Clyde” death investigation and signer of death certificates, and by Mrs. Alwyn (Vern) Hightower, employee of Conger Funeral Home. Affidavit witness signatures include Mrs. Ed Conger, wife of the Conger Funeral Home director, and retired Judge P. E. Brown, Second Judicial District Court of Louisiana, serving 1954-1969. Letter of Authentication is notarized by Violet L. Turner. On May 23, 1934, law enforcement officers ambushed outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow as they drove through Biennville Parish, Louisiana. The Conger Furniture Store/Funeral Home received the bodies after the shootout. The affidavit states the weapon was “enfolded in the skirt of Bonnie Parker and discovered in the Embalming room of Conger’s Funeral Home in Arcadia, Louisiana, by the late Mr. Charles Francis Bailey, who was employed at the time by Mr. Ed Conger as an embalmer.” The following day (5/24/34), Bailey gave the weapon as a souvenir to Mrs. Alwyn Hightower’s son, Dr. Robert Dawson Hightower, M.D. (b.1921-d.1973). Dr. Hightower served as a Naval Aviator in WWII, earning the Navy Air Medal with 2 Gold Stars and later as an Associate Professor of Orthopedics, LSU Medical School, Shreveport, LA, and passed this weapon down to his only child, the present consignor. This lot also includes six bullets found in the pistol and a photo archive of pictures taken by King Murphy, Mr. Bailey’s assistant and amateur photographer. Additionally, a Colt Manufacturing Company letter accompanies this lot stating the Model 1902 Colt was shipped to Simmons Hardware Company in St. Louis, Missouri on August 22, 1904 with a total shipment of 15 guns of this type. Additional items in the archive includes a 1973 offer letter for the gun and various newspapers referencing the 50th anniversary of the death of Bonnie & Clyde. The dated August 1973 letter from Peter Simon of Jean, Nevada offers to “purchase the gun, the book of actual pictures, and any other memorabilia….” Dr. Robert Hightower died October 27th, 1973. The letter also has handwritten notes from Dr. Hightower’s wife, “Before Dad died he had me write… Bob, this fellow wanted to buy the Clyde & Bonnie gun etc. I called him but I never did call and give him a price for I didn’t know what to charge– If you ever decided to do so you might call + give him a price if he is still there — The value may go up with time but it could go down for new people don’t even remember them— Thought I’d pass this on — It’s yours now to do as you wish — I love you Mother”. The gift of this weapon from the embalmer, Charles Bailey, to the young Dr. Hightower in 1934 was significant when one considers the rarity and expense of the Sporting Model 1902 pistol even at the time the gift was bestowed. It is especially significant when one considers the average pay of an embalmer working in rural Louisiana during the Great Depression. Specifications on the Colt Model 1902 (Sporting) Automatic Pistol: Caliber- 38 rimless, smokeless, 7 shot magazine, 6? barrel, magazine marked PAt’D SEPT. 9, 1884, hard rubber grips with molded checkering, the rampant colt design, and the name COLT at the top of the grips. Produced in 1904 with a total production of approximately 7500. Standard weight 2 pounds, 3 ounces. Condition: Colt pistol has aftermarket nickel finish but appears to retain the original factory grips. Minor oxidation to nickel finish. There are no records indicating the pistol has been disassembled or cleaned since acquisition in 1934, chamber verified as clear. Photograph album with toning to pages; photographs glued down. [See more photos →]

$99,450.00
Lot 81: Rare flag & archive from ship "Red White and Blue" Rare flag & archive from ship "Red White and Blue" Lot 81: Rare flag & archive from ship "Red White and Blue"

Flag and historical archive relating to the 1866 voyage of the miniature ship The Red White and Blue, which in 1866 became the smallest ship ever to cross the Atlantic. Note: A detailed history of this important nautical cache and the ship’s voyage, which captured attention and created controversy on both sides of the Atlantic, is available to interested parties, and includes flag history and description by Greg Biggs. ITEM 1: 13 star Flag, single ply wool bunting with hand appliqued stars. Front hoist inscription “Ship ‘Red White and Blue’-1866 of NY 2 tons 38/100 registered. To London and Paris Exposition = 1867 Capt. John M Hudson and F. E. Fitch.” Reverse hoist inscription reveals flag’s original use as a Civil War boat flag: “USSS Flambeau’s Picket boat 2nd cutter 1864, Acting ensign J.M. Hudson.” Exhibited Cheekwood Museum of Art, “Nashville Collects”, circa 1990. 31-1/4″ H x 45″ W. ITEM 2: The ship’s log, penned by Captain Hudson, including description of boat, newspaper clipping describing the voyage prior to departure, daily entries describing the trip and location, and details of the events at the Crystal Palace, Paris Exhibition and across Europe. Earliest entry date May 9th 1866, through December 27,1867. Log bears label for William H. Ritch, Commission Merchant, Ships Chandler & Grocer, 39 South Street, Corner Old Slip, New York. ITEM 3: Oval silver plated plaque, engraved, “Ingersoll Metallic Life Boat Red White and Blue. Ship rigged Sailed from New York, United States, July 9th 1866. Arrived off Hastings, England August 16th 1886. Navigators, Capt. John M. Hudson, and Mate Frank E. Fitch. Inventor and Builder Oliver Roland Ingersoll. Property of the American Boat & Oar Bazaar. 243 & 245 South and 475 & 447 Water Street New York.” Framed in later gilt frame, not examined out of frame. Exhibited Cheekwood Museum of Art, “Nashville Collects”, circa 1990. Sight: 8 1/4″ H x 10″ W Framed: 12″ H x 14″ W ITEM 4: Two framed prints including Currier and Ives lithograph “The Miniature Ship, Red, White, and Blue.” Print lists information on the size of the boat and a brief description of voyage. In later gilt frame. Sight: 9 3/4″ H x 14 1/4″ W. Framed: 19″ H x 23″ W. Also a print from an unknown publication: “Red, White, and Blue” on display at the Crystal Palace, Paris Exhibition of 1867. In later gilt frame. Sight: 8 7/8″ H x 9″ W. Framed: 14 1/4″ H x 15″ W. ITEM 5: a large collection of letters, photocopies, and publications pertaining to the ship’s crossing and career of Captain John Hudson, including the shoulder straps and gold braid from his Navy uniform. Provenance: Estate of A. Welling LaGrone, Jr., Nashville, Tenn. ABOUT THE FLAG: United States Navy vessels of the 19th Century, and even now, carried several flags based on the Stars and Stripes of the nation. The largest was the ensign, flown from the stern of the warship. The jack was flown from the bow flag staff only while the ship was in port, while the commission pennant was flown from the main mast in the era of sails or a high point in the age of steam. The flags varied in size based on the rating of the warship. These vessels also carried small boats called gigs, and these boats also were equipped with flags. Boat flags came into existence in the early 1850s and carried, at least based on that used by Commodore Matthew Perry on his voyage to Japan, 31 stars. In 1857, the number of stars was reduced to sixteen. Being smaller flags, the lower number of stars made them more visible at a distance. In 1862, the Navy Department further reduced the star count to thirteen. This may have been in homage to the flags of the Continental Navy of the Revolutionary War. From 1862 to 1865, the stars were arranged typically in three rows with four, five and four stars in each from top to bottom of the canton. The boat flag of the U.S.S. Flambeau/Red White & Blue is this star pattern. A boat flag with the same star pattern exists in the Zaricor Collection in California. After the Civil War, boat flags were changed to a three, two, three, two, three arrangement, again from top to bottom. According to noted flag historians Howard Madaus and David Martucci, these boat flags varied from five through ten feet on the fly with the hoist measuring about half of the length. The 1864 U.S. Navy flag regulations (basically revised from the 1854 regulations) listed ship ratings ten through fourteen as boat flags. Flags for the tenth rating measured 5.28 feet on the hoist by 10 feet on the fly. Eleventh rated ships carried boat flags of 4.20 feet on the hoist by 8 feet on the fly while twelfth rated ships carried boat flags of 3.70 by 7 feet. The thirteenth rated boat flags measured 3.20 feet by 6 feet and the fourteenth rates carried flags of 2.50 feet by 5 feet. The U.S.S. Flambeau boat flag measures 31 inches by 42 inches which corresponds to a fourteenth rated boat flag. The flag has been cut down in its fly length by at least 18 inches at some point after the Civil War when it became the flag of the S.S. Red White and Blue. This was probably due to the size of that boat being much smaller (only 2 tons) than the U.S.S. Flambeau. The flag is made from single ply wool bunting with the stripes and appliquéd stars being hand stitched. The cotton canvas hoist edge is marked on the reverse side, “U.S.S. Flambeau Picketboat, 2nd Cutter – 1864. Acting Ensign J. M. Hudson.” The second cutter marking probably indicates that the warship carried two gigs on board. The U.S.S. Flambeau was built in 1861 as a brigantine initially for the trade routes of China. She was acquired by the U.S. Navy in November of that year to augment their blockading fleet. Weighing 791 tons, she was 185 feet long by 30 feet wide. With her crew of 92 men, she carried between two and five guns during the war. Her career as a blockader was successful with four ships captured as prizes. The U.S.S. Flambeau was sold by the Navy in July 1865 after being decommissioned. As a merchant vessel, she was lost off North Carolina in March 1867. Acting Ensign J. M. Hudson left the Navy after the Civil War. He became the skipper of the S.S. Red White and Blue which became famous in nautical circles for the transiting of the Atlantic Ocean by such a small vessel. His old boat flag from the war was altered for the Red White and Blue, being marked on the obverse hoist edge, “Ship “Red White and Blue” of New York – 1866/2 tons – 35/100 Register/ to London and Paris Exposition 1867/ Captain J.M. Hudson.” – Flag catalog entry by Greg Biggs. Condition: ITEM 1: Flag survives in good condition with minor staining, some patches and fraying where flag attaches to hoist. The flag has been professionally conserved with a fine colored mesh attached for stabilization. Also, there are [See more photos →]

$35,960.00
Lot 506: Colonel Tomlinson Fort CSA Civil War Shell Jacket, 4 items Colonel Tomlinson Fort CSA Civil War Shell Jacket, 4 items Lot 506: Colonel Tomlinson Fort CSA Civil War Shell Jacket, 4 items

Civil War Confederate States of America shell jacket worn by Colonel Tomlinson Fort, 1st Georgia Infantry, Company L, plus shoulder straps and albumen print, 4 items total. 1st item: “Butternut” Richmond Depot woolen single-breasted shell jacket with six-piece body, one-piece sleeves, and six button holes with one wooden and three cloth buttons, osnaburg interior lining with one pocket. Unmarked. Also includes three loose buttons, two (2) wooden and one (1) mother of pearl. 28 1/2″ H x 21 3/4″ W x 11″ D. Note: This is the coat that Colonel Fort wore on his return to his home in Milledgeville, Georgia. The brass buttons were cut off in Savannah and replaced by the ones now on it, as a law had been issued forbidding Confederate States of America (CSA) buttons to be worn. 2nd-3rd items: Two (2) gold tone metal and fabric Captain’s shoulder straps, manufacturer’s marks for James A. Smith, stamped en verso. 1 1/2″ H x 4″ W x 5/8″ D. 4th item: Early 20th century albumen print depicting a composite of three Civil War era cartes de visite (CDV) of the Fort Brothers: Colonel Tomilson Fort (1839-1910), lower right (depicted wearing the shell jacket and shoulder straps in this lot); Dr. George Fort (1828-1866), top center; and Lieutenant John Porter Fort (1841-1917). The three portraits are superimposed on a decorative shield dated “61-65” and flanked by two crossed Confederate flags, above, and two crossed sabers with a “CSA” canteen, below, with a row of ten stars, across the top of the shield. Fragmentary red “Art Department” label, en verso. Housed under glass in a black wooden frame. Print – 8 7/8″ H x 7 5/8″ W. Sight – 9 3/4″ H x 7 3/4″ W. Framed – 10 7/8″ H x 8 7/8″ W x 3/4″ D. Note: a CDV of Dr. George Fort and his surgeon kit are also included in this auction, lot 511. Provenance: Private Ringgold, Georgia collection; among items purchased in the 1960’s from the old location of the A. P. Stewart Chapter of the UDC (United Daughters of the Confederacy), formerly the Nathan Bedford Forrest UCV (United Confederate Veterans) home, St. Elmo, Chattanooga, TN. Note: The 1st Georgia Infantry regiment, also known as the 1st Georgia Regulars, was organized at Macon, Georgia in April 1861. The companies first named were twelve months’ troops, a majority re-enlisting for the war, while others were mustered out when the twelve months expired. The regimental commander, Col. Charles J. Williams, died on February 8, 1862. Now led by Col. William J. Magill, the regiment served in the Army of Northern Virginia in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil War. When Magill was wounded at Antietam, being part of Gen. G.T. Angerson’s brigade, the command developed to Cpt. Richard A. Wayne. The 1st Georgia was transferred to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida in early 1863. In Gen. George P. Harrison’s brigade it participated in the Battle of Olustee. When Magill retired on September 3, 1864, Wayne was named as his successor. The regiment was surrendered along with Joseph E. Johnston’s army at Bennett Place in North Carolina on April 26, 1865. Biography: Colonel Tomlinson Fort (1839-1910) was born in Milledgeville, Georgia, to Dr. Tomlinson Fort (1787-1859) and Martha Low Fannin (1804-1883). Tomlinson Fort graduated from Oglethorpe University in 1857, and moved to Savannah, Georgia to practice law. Fort returned to his hometown to care for his father’s estate in 1859. At the beginning of the Civil War, Fort joined the 1st Georgia Infantry regiment and served throughout the war. Fort’s two brothers also served in the war; Lieutenant John Fort joined the 1st Georgia Infantry regiment and Dr. George Washington Fort was a surgeon, 53rd Regiment, Georgia Infantry. Fort was wounded five times during the Civil War including Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, and John’s Island, SC. Tomlinson Fort was captured in late 1864 until the remainder of the war. Fort moved to Chattanooga in 1865, and though he came to the city with very little, he quickly found work, and by the mid-1870’s, was one of Chattanooga’s leading businessmen. Fort served as city attorney, city recorder and served on the Board of Public Works before being elected Mayor in 1876. Fort’s election to the office marked a turning point for the city, as he was the first ex-confederate elected mayor and was able to improve the city’s financial status. (source: http://www.chattanooga.gov/about-chattanooga/history-of-mayors/1876-colonel-tomilinson-fort). See related lots 507, 511, 540 and 544. CONDITION: 1st item: Jacket is in stable condition with insect damage and age deterioration. Three-fourths of surface has holes, tears, abrasions, and/or unidirectional loss. Most significant damage: 1 1/2″ tear top right shoulder; 1″ hole top of left sleeve; 1″ tear with fraying left side top of collar; 2″ tear with fraying right side top of collar; 1″ unidirectional loss with fraying lower left edge on back; 3/4″ tear right side near arm hole on back. Heavy wear to buttons. Moderate soiling to end of sleeves and front opening. Interior lining discolored and weak seam with fraying right side top of button placket where wool joins lining. 2nd-3rd items: Overall good condition with surface grime, area of tarnish to metal, and holes, largest 1/2″ x 1 1/4″. 4th item: Overall stable condition with repaired tears, largest 8 1/8″ x 1 1/8″. Several pieces of white archival tape and scotch tape, minute foxing spots, en verso. [See more photos →]

$28,800.00
Lot 608: TN State Militia Jacket, John Sevier Commission, & Powder Horn TN State Militia Jacket, John Sevier Commission, & Powder Horn Lot 608: TN State Militia Jacket, John Sevier Commission, & Powder Horn

Early Tennessee Militia archive relating to Lieutenant William Graham including a Tennessee militia coat, signed Governor John Sevier military commission, and powder horn, 3 items total. 1st item: Early Tennessee State Militia Coat owned and worn by Lieutenant William Graham (1786-1857, served circa 1807-1815 in the Sixth Regiment in the Tennessee State Militia) comprised of a navy-blue wool body with hook and eye closure to red wool lapel, red wool collar and cuffs, the lapels and coattails lined in off white linen with two interior slip pockets, two faux pocket flaps to exterior, all with a total of (44) total flat brass buttons. One (1) navy-blue wool epaulet to left shoulder, two (2) pieces of navy-blue fabric sewn to right shoulder and top of coattails. 40 1/2" H x 24 1/2" W.2nd item: Governor John Sevier signedmilitary commission document conferring on William Graham of Jefferson County the rank of Lieutenant in the Sixth Regiment of the TennesseeMilitia, dated August 15, 1807. Countersigned by Robert Houston, Secretary of the State of Tennessee from 1807-1811. State seal, top left. 16" H x 9 7/8" W.3rd item: Early 19th century East Tennessee powder horn withound wooden plug end secured by brads, fabric strap attached to nail and nozzle. Piece of cloth with ink inscription reading "96" pasted to horn near plug. 11" outer circumference of longest curve. These items have all descended in the family of Lt. William Graham. The Number 96 on the powder horn corresponds to a similarnumbering system used on an inventory list created by Joseph Feamster Taylor (1892-1965) of Whitesburg, TN, son of Franklin Walter Taylor (1854-1919), grandson of Franklin William Taylor (1810-1897), great grandson of Lieutenant William Graham (1786-1857), and father of Joseph Franklin Taylor (1934-2015). Biographical Note: William Graham was born in Botetourt County, Virginia, to George Graham (1756-1832) and Elizabeth Turnley Graham (1764-1817). He married Mary ShieldsGraham (1795-1832) in 1814 and was the father of Eliza Jane Graham (1821-1897) and Mary Shields Graham (1824-1907). Upon the death of Mary, William sent his young daughters (ages 11 & 8) to live with their uncle, Dr. Samuel Shields. Eliza married Franklin William Taylor of Shields Station in Grainger County and they had twelve children together. One of their children, Samuel Milton Taylor (1842-1875) served in the Confederate Army of Tennessee (see Lot 610). Mary married Calvin Bird Nance of Nance's Ferry and they had seven children together. William Graham passed away in a tragic house fire on the night of September 17, 1857 at the age of 71 and is buried in the Graham ChapelCemetery, Jefferson County, TN. (source:https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/198785407/william-graham).Provenance: Estate of Anne Harrison Taylor & Joseph F. Taylor, Morristown, TN. CONDITION: 1st item: Discoloration, staining, to be expected from age. Moth holes, primarily to back of jacket, largest 1 1/4". Two buttons to bottom appear to be missing.Epaulet to right shoulder is not present. Accompanying note indicates that the coat was cleaned on April 24, 1975 for an exhibit. 2nd item: Overall good condition with toning, foxing spots, areas of dampstaining/acid burn, largest 1". Tears, areas of separation, largest 1 1/2", to fold lines. Signatures in good, legible condition. 3rd item: Natural age cracks, areas of insect damage, largest 1 1/8" x 3/4". [See more photos →]

$24,000.00
Lot 296: Confederate 1st Model Griswold revolver, SN 133 Confederate 1st Model Griswold revolver, SN 133 Lot 296: Confederate 1st Model Griswold revolver, SN 133

Confederate Griswold 1st Model 1851 Navy type percussion revolver, .38 caliber, serial number 133, all visible serial numbers matching. Wedge, left side of leading lever, left side of trigger guard and back strap, and interior of grips in channel marked with "V". Walnut stocks, round barrel, brass trigger guard and back strap, iron mounted, steel frame pins, checkered hammer, standard sights, loading lever. Three ring binder with previous James D. Juilia, Inc. sale record included with the lot. Barrel length – 7 1/2". Barrel length – 12 1/2". Provenance: Ex-Dick Kennedy Collection, Atlanta, Georgia. Purchased from James D. Juilia, Inc., April 2017. Ex-Jim Williams Collection, Atlanta, Georgia. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: This is among the earliest serial numbers noted in the standard production 1st model revolver made near Macon, Georgia. CONDITION: Action is OK. Pepper pitting to barrel and mountings. Chips to stocks. Barrel, wedge, and loading lever are loose in frame. Good to very good overall, metal shows old cleaning with staining and pitting. SN's and cryptics are all crisp and easily discerned. Gun appears totally original and complete externally with exception of loading lever screw. Grips are sound and solid with some sanding on bottoms with small putty repairs to inside toes. Front sight is an improvised blade which utilized the original pin base which appears contemporary to use. Mechanically gun indexes sporadically and only holds half cock. Discernible rifling is found in pitted bore. [See more photos →]

$21,760.00
Lot 616: Civil War Guidon, 19th Ohio, Cpl. Marcellus Messer Civil War Guidon, 19th Ohio, Cpl. Marcellus Messer Lot 616: Civil War Guidon, 19th Ohio, Cpl. Marcellus Messer

Civil War Union Cavalry Swallowtail Guidon Flag belonging to Corporal Marcellus Ovando Messer (1842-1938), 19th Regt., Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company C. The silk flag has a double wreath of 35 gilt-painted stars, indicating use between the admission of West Virginia as a state in 1863, and the admission of Nevada in 1865; canton and stripes are pieced and treadle-sewn. 26 14" x 36 3/4" sight, 30" x 40" framed. Note: according to flag historian Greg Biggs, the U.S. contracted for more of these guidons than the cavalry could use, so standards like this one were issued to infantry regiments as guide flags, which were placed on the left and right flanks of the regiment to help form their line of battle. The battles in which the 19th Ohio engaged were among the war's most infamous and included Shiloh, Missionary Ridge, and Chickamauga. They also participated in the Atlanta campaign, under General William Tecumseh Sherman. In all, the 19th regiment participated in 21 battles and crossed Tennessee 16 times, marching over 6,000 miles and traveling another 6,500 by rail and water. Cpl. Messer was born Nov. 2, 1842 in Guilford, New Hampshire. His family moved to Warren, Ohio when he was 14. When the Civil War broke out, Messer joined the 19th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Company C., on Sept. 7, 1861 and was promoted to Corporal in 1863. According to his discharge record, he was discharged as a corporal on Dec. 31, 1863 at Flat Creek, Tennessee "by reason of re-enlistment as a veteran volunteer" and again served in C Company. After Lee's surrender, he went to Texas as part of General Grant's army to monitor Mexican Emperor Maximillian. He was discharged Oct. 24, 1865 at San Antonio. According to his records, he "served continually in the same Company and Regiment through the entire war… without being sick or wounded or on detached service, and having never missed a battle in which the regiment was engaged. He did not taste of liquor while in the service." After the war, Messer returned to Warren, Ohio, and married Frances "Frannie" M. Dickey. They had one son and lived in the old Dickey homestead. Messer, a Republican, went on to serve as a member of the city council for five years in the 1880s and on other municipal boards. He also served as a bailiff in the Probate Court for more than 20 years. Note: Some of this biographical information comes from a newspaper article on Messer in the Youngstown OH Vindicator newspaper, August 14, 2005. A copy of the article is included with this lot. Provenance: by descent in the Messer family to present consignor. Note: remnants of a box formerly used to store the flag bore this inscription: "A regimental flag of the 19 O.V.I. carried during Nov. 1861-65." CONDITION: 4 1/4" tear upper center canton, with two holes – 2" diameter and 1 1/2" L – at center right edge of canton. Two 1" to 1 1/2" L holes to stripes along sleeve. Center with 3" hole/loss; each tip with losses and fraying. Several other small holes and slits; light fading, staining, discoloration and creasing throughout. Flag has been mounted (not glued down) atop white matting, under acrylic, and framed in a molded giltwood frame. [See more photos →]

$20,480.00
Lot 175: Confederate Naval CDV Album Archive – CSS Shenandoah, Florida, Alabama Confederate Naval CDV Album Archive – CSS Shenandoah, Florida, Alabama Lot 175: Confederate Naval CDV Album Archive – CSS Shenandoah, Florida, Alabama

Important Naval Photographic Archive CDV Album of Lieutenant Dabney Scales of the CSS Shenandoah including images of uniformed and non-uniformed Confederate Naval officers from the CSS Shenandoah, CSS Florida, and the CSS Alabama, a 1/4 plate ambrotype of Dabney Scales in uniform, and extracts from the log of the CSS Shenandoah from August 2-5, 1865 detailing the encounter with the British ship, Barracouta, and learning of the overthrow of the Confederate government. Note – the Confederate ship, CSS Shenandoah, fired the last shot of the Civil War and marked the final surrender of Confederate forces on November 6, 1865. Given the orders to destroy the New England whaling fleet, the partially crewed Confederate ship circumnavigated the earth, capturing 38 vessels and taking over 1000 prisoners between 1864-65. Twenty-five ships were captured after the Confederacy had collapsed. 1st grouping – CDV album of Dabney Scales dated July 15, 1863 Paris, France on inside cover and a second, smaller CDV album marked Havana June 1, 1863. Interior contains several CDVs of fellow Confederate Naval officers, women acquaintances, and European subject matter including works of art and famous Europeans. A couple of notable women with signed CDVs to Scales include Rosa Bonheur (realist painter, sculptor) and Lillie W. Hitchcock (Coit). Of the approximately 25 identified Confederate naval Officers, 15 are in uniform. An additional eight CDVs of males in formal attire are likely Confederate Naval officers but have yet to be identified. Identified Naval officers of the CSS Shenandoah include Lieutenant Dabney Scales (signed), William Breedlove Smith, Paymaster (signed), Dr. Fred McNulty, ship assistant surgeon (signed), Lt. John Grimball, Lt. William C. Whittle (signed Jack), William Breedlove Smith (w/out uniform), Edwin G. Booth (assistant surgeon?), Midshipman John T. Mason, and Chief Engineer Matthew O’Brien. Joe Scales (Confederate Army), Dabney”s brother, is also pictured and signed en verso. Three formally attired gentleman with Liverpool marked CDVs are likely Shenandoah crew members. Uniformed Confederate Naval officers of the CSS Florida include Lt. Sardine G. Stone (signed), a CDV of the CSS Florida with small images of each crew member surrounding the Florida ship image (each officer identified), Lt. Midshipman R.S. Floyd, Lt. George Dwight Bryan (became mayor of Charleston after war), Lt. Sardine G. Stone pictured with another male, and Lt. James Lingard Hoole pictured with another male, CDV of non-uniformed male (possibly T.T. Hunter). Uniformed Confederate Naval officers of the CSS Alabama include Lt. Joseph D. “Fighting Joe” Wilson, Midshipman E. R. Anderson, Lt. Richard F. Armstrong, and Midshipman Eugene Anderson Maffit, and possibly Surgeon Galt. Other CDV s Confederate officers in the smaller album lot include P. T. Beauregard with an Augusta, GA label, an unidentified officer with a Louisville, KY label, and a CDV of Confederate General Joe Johnson. 2nd grouping – Extracts from the “Log of the C.S.S. Shenandoah on a cruise Aug 2-3-4 1865” with course headings, latitude and longitude for each day. August 2, 1865 reads, “Got Steam and stood in chase. Took in all sail except the head sails. At 4:15 came up with chase stopped the engine & sent a boat along side the English barque “Baracuta” from San Francisco bound to Liverpool. 13 days out ——– Having received by the barque Barracouta the sad intelligence of the overthrow of the Confederate Government. All attempts to destroy the shipping on property of the Northern States will cease from this date. In accordance with which the First Lieutentant W. C. Whittle Jr. received the order from the Commander to strike below the battery and disarm the ship & crew.” 3rd item – 1/4 plate size ambrotype of Confederate Dabney Scales in an early Naval uniform. Hand tinted buttons and lapel highlighted in gold. Littlefield, Parsons & Co. case patented 1856 & 1857 with a beehive and farm implements pattern on front and back. Provenance: Direct descendant of Lt. Dabney Scales. CONDITION: 1st grouping – larger album with spine and covers loose with losses. CDVs overall very good condition with a couple showing more foxing near the back of the larger album, some CDVs with edges trimmed. 2nd item – extract pages in overall very good condition with pages very legible. 3rd item – ambrotype image with scattered losses to the face area. [See more photos →]

$20,460.00
Lot 176: Confederate CSS Shenandoah Diary and Archive Confederate CSS Shenandoah Diary and Archive Lot 176: Confederate CSS Shenandoah Diary and Archive

Important 1865 Confederate CSS Shenandoah ship diary archive of Lieutenant Dabney Scales including 1865 diary journal (85 pages, 104 pages total), an ambrotype and CDV of Lt. Dabney Scales in uniform, a CDV of the Shenandoah, and an author signed book/pamplet titled, “Cruises of the Confederate States Steamers “Shenandoah” and “Nashville” by Captain William C. Whittle, 1910. Note – the Confederate ship, CSS Shenandoah, fired the last shot of the Civil War and marked the final surrender of Confederate forces on November 6, 1865. Given the orders to destroy the New England whaling fleet, the partially crewed Confederate ship circumnavigated the earth, capturing 38 vessels and taking over 1000 prisoners between 1864-65. Twenty five ships were captured after the Confederacy had collapsed. Biography of Dabney Scales – Dabney Minor Scales (1841-1920) of Memphis, TN was the son of Peter Scales, a planter originally from Virginia. Dabney was born and raised in Holly Springs, Mississippi, attended the US Naval Academy and joined the Confederate Navy at the outbreak of the Civil War. He served on the CSS Savannah, CSS Capital, CSS Arkansas, CSS Atlanta, and the CSS Shenandoah. In 1863-4, Scales was assigned to Europe and spent time in London and Paris regarding the outfitting and manning of Confederate ships constructed in England. Fearing he would be prosecuted as a pirate after the Civil War, Dabney Scales lived in Mexico for a short time, but was back in the States practicing law in Memphis by about 1869. He married Susan Winchester Powell (granddaughter of Gen. James Winchester) in Nashville circa 1885 and was elected to the Tennessee legislature and served in the Tennessee State Senate 1895-1896. He returned to active Naval duty in the Spanish American War, serving as a lieutenant despite his age. 1st item – CSS Shenandoah ship diary of Lieutenant Dabney Scales, 85 pages with some hand drawn illustrations. Complete diary has a total number of 104 pages and includes a partial journal by a different hand from May 1864 – December 1864 relating to the ship Edward of New Bedford – the first whaling vessel captured by the Shenandoah, and two pages of an 1870 entry by Dabney Scales. The log of the Shenandoah is titled “Confederate States Shenandoah cruising for Yankees”. Scales retroactively records events back to February 13th, 1865 in Melbourne, Australia where the Shenandoah was dry docked for repairs. The diary goes into extensive detail on major events including the encounter with authorities in Melbourne and Liverpool, the capturing of vessels and crews for the year 1865, encounters with the natives, and interactions among Shenandoah officers. A June 22nd entry refers to the “Sophia Thorton” ship Lt. Scales boarded. The ship “made some show of escape by standing on through the ice, but a shot from one of the rifle guns brought her to.” He continues, “out of these vessels we have heard the most disheartening news I have ever heard from our poor suffering country. The captures of Savannah, Charleston, ..Richmond together with the surrender of Lee, with an army of 22,000 men – with this also comes the tradgical death of the “Rail Splitter” by the hand of an assasin. This will, of course, make a hero of him –”. His last entry on this day, “To the part of this news relating to the surrender of Lee”s army + the disbanding of those not surrendered, I give no credence at all……I think however we should struggle on to the last, and if as the yankee papers say —Davis crosses the Mississippi to establish a Confederacy there. I for one shall follow and join him rather than subject to Yankee rule.” On August 3rd, Lt. Scales writes, “How shall I attempt to describe the change that has come over the officers and crew of this ship within the last twenty four hours. I can only write a few unintelligible words that may serve to recall to my mind what my own feelings were yesterday afternoon…we came in sight of a sail – the first seen since we left the Arctic… Barracouta (ship) – boarded her and brought off the news – My G.! What news it was for us…. I was therefore in a measure prepared for either good or bad news but not for such as was in store for me….The only words I caught were – “All over – President Davis and cabinet prisoners in New York – All organized armies surrendered…” Upon arriving at Liverpool in November 1865, Dabney Scales writes on November 6th – “The (British) pilot boarded us in the mid watch this morning. His news confirms that given us by the “Barracouta” – the downfall of the Southern Confederacy. The war, he said had been over so long that people had forgotten all about it.” While many of these events have been published in previous books on the Shenandoah, this diary represents new primary source material previously unavailable. Regarding the partial journal of the whaling ship “Edward” starting May 5th 1864 and ending December 1st 1864 (17 pages), the author writes of Right whales sightings and discusses and event Nov. 29th where a whale was struck and capsized the boat. 2nd grouping – 1/4 plate ambrotype of Confederate Dabney Scales in uniform with hand tinted gold highlights, CDV of Lt. Dabney Scales taken in Melbourne, Austrailia. Marked verso “Johnstone & Co. Melbourne”, 3 7/8″ x 2 1/2″, and a CDV of the ship, CSS Shenandoah, 3 3/4″ x 2 3/8”. Last item – Author signed book/pamplet titled, “Cruises of the Confederate States Steamers “Shenandoah” and “Nashville” by Captain William C. Whittle, 1910. Page 32 signed, “For D. M. Scales from Yours Sincerely Wm C Whittle March 31st 1910”. Cover is marked in black pen, “Dabney M. Scales compliments of the Author”. Provenance – Direct descendant of Lt. Dabney Scales. CONDITION: 1st item – Journal missing cover, binding loose and frayed, several pages separated, edges of several pages charred and worn. All pages appear to be legible. Diary page size 8 1/2″ x 13 3/8”. 2nd item – Ambrotype with cover unattached, Dabney Scales CDV with tape verso, Shenandoah CDV trimmed. and CDVs in verso. 3rd item – pamplet/book in overall very good condition with some browning to covers. [See more photos →]

$19,470.00
Lot 265: Battle of Shiloh Polk Pattern Bible Flag, S.D.J. Lewis Battle of Shiloh Polk Pattern Bible Flag, S.D.J. Lewis Lot 265: Battle of Shiloh Polk Pattern Bible Flag, S.D.J. Lewis

Battle of Shiloh, Major General Leonidas Polk pattern personal/bible flag, presented to S. Duff J. Lewis, 12th Battalion, Tennessee Cavalry. Flag comprised of machine sewn appliqued red and white silk on blue silk ground with eleven stitched stars in gold silk thread, obverse, appliqued white silk cross and oval with stitched "SHILOH" in red thread, reverse. Blue silk loop, top right corner. Also includes a cabinet card portrait of Lewis with Wallin, Birmingham, AL studio marks. Signed by Lewis with later genealogical information, en verso. Flag housed under double sided glass in a frame. Case wishes to thank Military Historian Greg Biggs for his essay with additional information on this flag (see attached report). Flag – 11 1/2" H x 7 1/2" W. Cabinet card – 6 5/8" H x 4 3/8" W. Mid 19th century. Provenance: Descended in the family of S. Duff J. Lewis. Note: BIBLE/PERSONAL FLAG OF S. DUFF J. LEWIS, 12TH TENNESSEE CAVALRY BATTALION IN A RARE POLK CORPS CONFIGURATION: This essay will cover the known details of a small Bible or personal flag formerly owned by Pvt. S. Duff J. Lewis, later of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. As will be shown, some speculation, backed by evidence of location of Pvt. Lewis at a specific time frame, will be necessary as the record is not clear as to when exactly this flag was issued to or made for him. The flag itself is of a unique pattern and this will also be covered in this essay along with the unit history of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion and Lewis' war record as shown in the Compiled Service Records file from the National Archives. Pvt. S. Duff J. Lewis. According to information supplied to me by Case Antiques, Lewis came from a family where his father was a Methodist minister. Based on the unit he would join as to where it was formed and would fight in the Civil War, Lewis was from East Tennessee. While he is listed in the Compiled Service Records of the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion (as Duff Lewis), he apparently did not join that unit with the rank of private until later in the war, possibly as late as February 1864. Prior to his joining that unit, Lewis was working for the Confederate Quartermaster Corps as a clerk in the military post office in the Department of East Tennessee which was under the command of General George Crittenden in September 1861. He apparently worked for Tennessee State Quartermaster officer Major Samuel T. Bicknell, who had been appointed as quartermaster in Knoxville, Tennessee by state governor Isham Harris. Bicknell would later apply to be a quartermaster in the Confederate Army with the endorsements of Confederate Senator Gustavus Henry and Confederate Postmaster General John Reagan. The forces of George Crittenden, under the tactical command of General Felix Zollicoffer, were defeated badly at the Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky in mid-January 1862. Zollicoffer was killed in action and the army routed. Falling back into East Tennessee, many of the troops were then transferred to Corinth, Mississippi where a new Confederate army was being formed.Lewis in the Collapse of the Confederate Line in Tennessee and Counter Offensive at Shiloh. By March 1862, five different Confederate armies were defending the large Department Number Two, which ran from the Appalachian Mountains westward across the Mississippi River into Arkansas and Missouri. West of the river was the Army of the West under Generals Earl Van Dorn and Sterling Price (formerly of the Missouri State Guard). East of the river was General Leonidas Polk's Grand Division, holding from Memphis, Tennessee northward to Columbus, Kentucky, a huge fortress on the bluffs above the river. At Forts Henry and Donelson on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers near Middle Tennessee was the large garrison under General John B. Floyd, while to the northeast in Bowling Green, Kentucky, the Army of Central Kentucky defended the railroad to Nashville. This army was commanded by General William J. Hardee while department command General Albert Sidney Johnston was also present. Arriving in January 1862 from Virginia, was General P.G.T. Beauregard who assumed command over Polk as assistant department commander to Johnston. Lastly, split between Mobile, Alabama and Pensacola, Florida was the Army of Mobile and Pensacola under General Braxton Bragg.With the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson by mid-February, 1862, the vast majority of its garrison and the subsequent loss of the Tennessee state capital of Nashville only a few days later, the entire defense line of the Confederates collapsed. It was to reform along the Tennessee/Alabama/Mississippi border with the new base at Corinth, Mississippi becoming the rendezvous point. This town became a focal point thanks to the two railroads that joined there (including the most important track in the Confederacy, the Memphis & Charleston Railroad) and its closeness to the Tennessee River. This allowed the basing of a vast amount of supplies. Polk's Grand Division, the Army of Central Kentucky and Bragg's forces were ordered to meet at Corinth along with the Army of the West (although they would not arrive until after the Battle of Shiloh fought in early April) for the coming Confederate counter-offensive. A brigade was sent from New Orleans (Department Number One) as additional reinforcements as well as the remnants of Crittenden's and Zollicoffer's commands from East Tennessee, now under General (and former U.S. Vice President) John C. Breckinridge. On March 29, 1862, general orders were issued from General Johnston to form the new Army of the Mississippi, as their mission was the defense of the Mississippi River Valley. Polk's command became the First Corps (two divisions of two brigades each); Bragg's the Second Corps (two divisions of three brigades each), Hardee's the Third Corps (three large brigades) and Breckinridge's the Reserve Corps (three brigades).At some point in early 1862, Lewis transferred to the command of Major David Sullins (also listed as Sullens). Sullins, a Kentuckian, and former chaplain of the 19th Tennessee Infantry (an East Tennessee raised regiment), became a brigade quartermaster on January 7, 1862 in the division of General Crittenden, specifically the Second Brigade. With the transfer of those troops to Corinth after the Mill Springs disaster, Sullins and Lewis went along. This is based on two invoices in Lewis' file signed by Sullins as well as documents in Sullins' file. Sullins was then appointed as Brigade Quartermaster for Colonel W.S. Statham's Third Brigade (later Fourth Brigade) of the Reserve Corps, whose troops had fought at Mill Springs and whose brigade was created out of the two brigades from that battle (less a couple regiments who remained in East Tennessee). Indeed, one invoice, dated May 15, 1862, states that Lewis was being paid for, "one month's service as clerk in Brigade Quartermaster's Department from 31st March 1862 to 30th April, 1862". A second invoice for pay from April 30 to June 15, 1862 also covers Lewis' time serving with Sullins. Both are during the time frame of the Third and evolution into the Fourth Brigade, Reserve Corps which came later in April 1862. Invoices for both brigades can also be found in Sullins' file. These notations on the early history of the Army of the Mississippi and the cited invoice are important as it places Lewis in the right place and time to have enabled him to receive the flag in question for the Battle of Shiloh which was fought on April 6-7, 1862 in West Tennessee. Initially a Confederate victory, Union reinforcements arrived during the night of April 6th and on the next day launched a counter-attack that slowly drove the Confederates from the field. General Albert Sidney Johnston was killed in action and command of the army fell upon the shoulders of General Beauregard who ordered a retreat back to Corinth. Sullins resigned as a quartermaster in October 1862 but a month later he noted, "Capt. J.F.J. Lewis has been with me as my Assist. in the Q.M. Dept., since Jan. inst.," and goes on to recommend him as a quartermaster in the Confederate Army. While he gets his first name incorrect, he also, for some reason, lists Lewis as a captain. Nothing in Lewis' file bears out this promotion.Lewis did remain with the Quartermaster Department into 1863, where in January he was posted to the depot in Tullahoma, Tennessee, southwest of Murfreesboro. He remained there until the Confederate Army of Tennessee had been forced out of the Middle Tennessee region by a Union army under General William S. Rosecrans in the Tullahoma Campaign of June/early July, which led directly to the capture of Chattanooga in early September. Such supplies as could be saved from Tullahoma were loaded onto trains and sent to Georgia, primarily Dalton and as far south as Kingston, as the Battle of Chickamauga raged in mid-September. The victorious Confederates pursued Rosecrans back to Chattanooga but could never capture the city although they laid siege to it. That was broken in late November with massive Union reinforcements the Confederates falling back to Dalton, Georgia for the winter. In February 1864, Lewis began working at the depot in Kingston, Georgia and remained there into June, before the Union armies of General William T. Sherman forced that depot to be evacuated towards Atlanta. Here he worked for Captain A.L. Hamilton, another former chaplain turned quartermaster who, like Sullins, also worked for General George Crittenden in East Tennessee. One payroll invoice in Lewis' file mentions his Kingston service. One last notation states that Lewis was working for Hamilton as late as July 22, 1864, as the battles swirled around Atlanta itself at this time. While nowhere in the Lewis' Compiled Service Record states a date, it was probably in mid-1864 when he joined the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion, and may have been on detached service from them remaining in the quartermaster department or perhaps serving in the field with that command. The record is not clear at all on this.After the war, Lewis married Helen Arthur of Kentucky and lived in Knoxville, Tennessee. His daughter, Eliza, married William K. McClure in 1889. In April 1938, she wrote (as Mrs. W.K. McClure) to the U.S. War Department asking for information about her father's war record and she received a response that features both typed and hand written paragraphs. This letter is also in Lewis' file.12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion. A detailed history of this unit is not needed but since Lewis' file is with them, some history might be helpful. This battalion was formed on September 1, 1862 from several companies of partisan rangers that had been raised in East Tennessee pursuant to the Partisan Rangers Act of April 1862. These companies had been raised in Hawkins County and Greene County as well as the towns of Greenville, Morristown and Knoxville. Major T.W. Adrian was in command until his death in November 1862 whereupon Major Frank Phipps and soon after Major George Day (later Lt. Colonel).Their first action was in the Kentucky Campaign of August-October, 1862 where they fought in the cavalry brigade of Joseph Wheeler. After the campaign's conclusion, they were transferred to the brigade of Colonel John Scott, Department of East Tennessee. In mid-June 1863, the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion was consolidated with the 16th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion to become Rucker's Legion, led by Col. Edmund Rucker. The new command fought in the Chickamauga Campaign of September as part of Wheeler's cavalry corps before being sent back to East Tennessee where they would fight during the miserable winter of 1863/1864.With Rucker's transfer to Mississippi, his legion was disbanded in February 1864 and both battalions reverted to their old formations. Now part of the Department of East Tennessee and Western Virginia, the 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion became part of General John C. Vaughn's Brigade with whom they would serve for the rest of the war fighting in the Valley of Virginia to upper East Tennessee. When the news of Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865 arrived, the battalion and the rest of the Confederate troops in this department disbanded and went home. If Lewis joined this battalion after July 1864 he would have been involved with their war history as part of Vaughn's Brigade for the rest of the war. Confederate Bible or Personal Flags: To date there has not been any written essay covering the topic of Confederate Bible or personal flags. This is a shame as there are a number of them still extant and their existence can add to our knowledge of how flags can have a personal connection to home in addition to the unit battle flags presented in the early phases of the Civil War to companies and regiments as they formed.These flags were typically made by ladies from the home towns or counties from where men derived to form combat units. Some went off to war with soldiers in 1861 while others would be made during the war and sent to them by mail. Their sizes varied from three by four inches to one by two feet. Some of the larger ones were flown on tents and indeed a famous image of the Clinch Rifles, 5th Georgia Infantry, shows just such a flag being flown from the top of a tent with some troops depicted in front. The epithet "Bible flag" comes from their probable use, at least for the much smaller flags of this type, as patriotic book marks used by soldiers as they read their Bibles. Although smaller than the aforementioned personal flags, even these varied in both sizes and quality of manufacture. The vast majority of these flags I have seen are of the First National pattern. There are some of the Second National pattern and even Third National but the First National pattern dominates. The star counts also vary although no flag historian has ever created a data base of these to track that. Some stars are ornate while I have seen others that are two simple crossed stitches including one in the collections of the Tennessee State Library and Archives bearing fifteen such stars. This flag was made in Nashville. Very unique to these flags are those of a battle flag pattern as used by the Army of the Mississippi/Army of Tennessee.Battle Flags of the Army of the Mississippi/Army of Tennessee. The four components of the army that formed in Corinth, Mississippi in March 1862 brought, in two cases, unique battle flags that had been adopted earlier in 1862. Polk's Grand Division, later Polk's Corps, developed a flag based on Episcopal Church heritage and heraldry. Polk, a West Point graduate who was also an ordained Episcopal minister, was Bishop of the Southwest before the war. This flag utilized a red Cross of St. George (+) bearing thirteen white stars on a blue field. The first version lacked the white fimbration that ran between the cross and field. Forty five of these were made of bulk purchased dress silk in Memphis, Tennessee in January 1862 and sent to Polk's troops who were in upper West Tennessee as well as the area around Columbus, Kentucky. Of these only three survive today.In August 1862 a second version of this flag was made for Polk's corps, especially General Benjamin F. Cheatham's Division just prior to the start of the Kentucky Campaign. These flags, made of wool with cotton stars, were smaller, bore only eleven white stars and added white fimbration to the red cross. These battle flags remained in use into 1863. It is not known how many were made of this version and only a few survive today. The Army of Central Kentucky, stationed at Bowling Green, Kentucky received their distinctive battle flags also in January 1862. Made by a local sewing circle from a design by General Simon B. Buckner, these simple flags were also blue bearing a white circle. This circle bore the unit designation of each regiment. There was a white hoist edge. Buckner's Division brought these flags to Fort Donelson when they were transferred there in February 1862. With the rest of the army becoming known as Hardee's Corps, the name of this battle flag has come to be known as the Hardee pattern. Hardee's Corps would use these through 1863 when they were replaced by the rectangular Augusta Depot Southern Cross pattern. From 1864 until the end of the war, however, Patrick Cleburne's Division not only continued to use this pattern, but received two newer versions as the year progressed. Bragg's Corps, which came up from Mobile and Pensacola to Corinth, carried mostly First National flags and upon arrival, General Bragg was informed that his corps would henceforth carry a flag based on the Southern Cross pattern that Beauregard had been instrumental in getting adopted by the army in Virginia when he was there in the fall of 1861. This flag had diagonally crossed blue bars (X) with white fimbration bearing twelve white stars (with six pointed stars) on a red field. Three sides of the flag were bordered in yellow. The flags were roughly square. Made in New Orleans and shipped to Corinth, they became known as the Bragg Pattern battle flag. Polk's Corps had a set made as well but they did not arrive in time for use at Shiloh and equipped the corps after that battle although mostly replaced in August by the second version of the Polk Corps flag. Breckinridge's Reserve Corps (later his division) used mostly First National flags although in May 1862 would also create their own distinctive flags. As the Army of the Mississippi marched from Corinth to fight at Shiloh in early April 1862, staff officers rode the along the marching columns of troops carrying examples of the three main corps flags announcing to them the name of the corps they represented intending to familiarize the men with them to avoid friendly fire incidents. Several years ago at the Franklin, Tennessee Civil War show, one dealer had a Bible/personal flag for an Arkansas soldier of the Hardee pattern. I have never seen one prior to this nor after so far. Polk Corps Bible/Personal flag of S. Duff J. Lewis. The exciting thing about this flag is that it is the first of the Polk Corps pattern that I have ever seen in over twenty eight years of flag research. In my opinion, this adds a great deal to its collectability. Even more unique is the Latin/Christian cross on the reverse side also bears a battle honor for "Shiloh". No Bible/personal flag that I have seen or have files for bear any battle honors although a couple bear the name of the maker or something patriotic. This, too, greatly adds to its collectability. The flag is made of machine sewn silk. The red cross bears eleven embroidered white stars. On the reverse side a white silk cross is sewn to the blue field while the battle honor is also embroidered in a white silk oval. The fly end is feathered rather than solid. Overall, the flag measures 11 1/2 inches on the fly by 7 1/2 inches on the hoist. A small semi-looped attachment is sewn to the upper left corner of the flag resembling ties that would attach a battle flag to its staff. In this case it is only decorative. There is some sort of stain in one quadrant of the flag. A smaller stain looking like it came from the same source is also on another portion of the field. This would need to be seen by a conservator with experience in 19th Century flags to determine what the stain is made from. According to a letter written by an unknown family member after the war, the flag was given to, "veterans of this battle, including my great, great, great grandfather, S.D.J. Lewis, were later presented w/ceremonial battle flags. This is his flag". As has been reported already, Lewis was in Corinth during the Shiloh campaign working for the brigade quartermaster, David Sullins. Quartermasters would go with their brigades as they marched into action making sure that needed supplies were sufficient and that more could be brought forward to the battlefield as it waged. However, as mentioned, at the time of Shiloh, Mullins was quartermaster of the Third Brigade, which was Colonel Statham's of Breckinridge's Reserve Corps. This corps did not use Polk Corps battle flags at Shiloh. So how did such a flag get presented to Lewis? One can only speculate as to how this happened and there is no evidence that has been located to date that can tell us how a flag of one corps made it to a soldier of another corps. Nor do we know how many of these were made or even when they were made or presented. I can theorize that these came in the summer of 1862 at the earliest as it follows the second version of the Polk Corps flag that came out in August 1862. This report will include images of both versions of these flags so that the mentioned differences can be noted. Conclusion: While some questions remain regarding this flag, there is no doubt as to its authenticity due to its line of ownership coming from Lewis' family as proven by the letter of his great-great-great grandson. As stated before, this flag is very unique and will be quite interesting to flag collectors due to it being the only known example of a Bible/personal flag of this pattern. It is exceedingly well made and quite striking with vivid colors, obviously the product of a maker with considerable skill used to embroidery and working with silk.Besides images of the Polk Corps flags, this report will also include the Compiled Service Record of S.D.J. Lewis. Other documents, already in the possession of Case Antiques, will also accompany the flag upon sale. Gregory G. Biggs, Military Historian, December 21, 2018. Bibliography: Connelly, Thomas Lawrence, Army of the Heartland: The Army of Tennessee, 1861-1862 (Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, 1967); Hafendorfer, Kenneth A., Mill Springs: Campaign and Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky (KH Press, Louisville, 2001; )Horn, Stanley F. and others, Tennesseans in the Civil War, Volume One (Civil War Centennial Commission, Nashville, 1964); Madaus, Howard Michael and Needham, Robert D., The Battle Flags of the Confederate Army of Tennessee (Milwaukee Public Museum, Milwaukee, 1976); Roman, Alfred, The Military Operations of General Beauregard, Volume 1 (Da Capo Press, New York, 1994); Smith, Timothy B., Shiloh: Conquer or Perish (University Press of Kansas, Lawrence, 2014); Sword, Wiley, Shiloh: Bloody April (Revised Edition) (Morningside Press, Dayton, 2001); The War of the Rebellion, A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series I, Volume X, Part Two (Government Printing Office, Washington, 1884). Other Sources: Greg Biggs Flag Files, Clarksville, TN; Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers who Served in Organizations From the State of Tennessee, 12th Tennessee Cavalry Battalion, Duff Lewis File (National Archives and Records Administration, RG 109, Microcopy M268, Roll 53); Compiled Service Records of Confederate Generals and Staff Officers and Nonregimental Enlisted Men, Samuel T. Bicknell File (NARA, RG 109, Microcopy M 331, Roll 23); Compiled Service Records of Confederate Generals and Staff Officers and Nonregimental Enlisted Men, A.L. Hamilton File (NARA, RG 109, Microcopy M 331, Roll 115); Compiled Service Records of Confederate Generals and Staff Officers and Nonregimental Enlisted Men, David Sullins File (NARA, RG 109, Microcopy M 331, Roll 239). (Additional high-resolution photos are available at www.caseantiques.com.) CONDITION: Fraying to right edge. Surface stains, largest 2 1/2" x 1 3/8". Scattered tears, largest 3/4", with few minute holes. Loop is torn in half. [See more photos →]

$19,200.00
Lot 110: Civil War brass frame Revolver, poss. Griswold Civil War brass frame Revolver, poss. Griswold Lot 110: Civil War brass frame Revolver, poss. Griswold

Civil War era brass frame revolver .36 cal, six shot, serial numbers 1646 on cylinder, barrel, and brass receiver. Serial number ending in 26 on lever, brass trigger guard, wedge, and wooden grip. Roman numeral “II” above tear down wedge for barrel. Similar to a Model 1851 Navy type percussion revolver manufactured by Samuel Griswold in Griswoldville, Georgia. Barrel length: 7 3/8″. Provenance: Gatlinburg, TN collection. Condition: Cylinder not advancing properly, unable to remove barrel from frame cylinder possibly due to rust, replaced screws, indention marks around tear down wedge (both sides), brass frame with minor marks, tip of wooden grip handles with minor losses. [See more photos →]

$17,700.00
Lot 294: Morse Marked Brass Framed Carbine, SN# 1007 Morse Marked Brass Framed Carbine, SN# 1007 Lot 294: Morse Marked Brass Framed Carbine, SN# 1007

Confederate Morse Marked Brass Framed Carbine, .52 caliber, serial number R1007. Breech marked "Morse". Butternut stocks, brass frame, trigger guard, and butt plate, round rifled barrel, dovetail mounted brass front sight blade and dovetail mounted fixed rear sight, iron breech block. Three ring binder with additional information and photos included with this lot. Barrel length – 20". Overall length – 40". Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. CONDITION: Action is good. Exterior of barrel with overall moderate pitting. Lands and grooves are visible with some pitting inside of barrel. Area of repair behind trigger guard. Screwheads are somewhat buggered. [See more photos →]

$14,400.00
Lot 277: Confederate Baton Rouge, LA Arsenal Model 1855 Leather Cartridge Box Confederate Baton Rouge, LA Arsenal Model 1855 Leather Cartridge Box Lot 277: Confederate Baton Rouge, LA Arsenal Model 1855 Leather Cartridge Box

Confederate Baton Rouge, Louisiana Arsenal Made Model 1855 Rifleman's Pattern Leather Cartridge Box. Brown leather, single stitched with scalloped edge to outer flap and lunate interior flap over implement pouch with tab closure. Interior flap marked "C.S. ARSENAL" over "BATON ROUGE.LA.". Possible initials to outer flap. Includes closing tab, brass finial, one piece tin liner, and two belt loops. 6 1/4" H x 8 3/8" W x 2 3/8" D. Provenance: Mike Martin Collection. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: This Cartridge Box is pictured in "Collecting the Confederacy" by Shannon Pritchard, 2005, page 89. CONDITION: The box is in very good condition. The leather is strong with no tears, the stitching is tight. No provision is present for an over the shoulder sling. [See more photos →]

$14,400.00
Lot 510: 4 Confederate Brass Buttons, inc. Tennessee 4 Confederate Brass Buttons, inc. Tennessee Lot 510: 4 Confederate Brass Buttons, inc. Tennessee

Four (4) Civil War Confederate officer staff buttons. 1st item: Tennessee brass coat button, 2-piece construction, depicting the Tennessee state seal, a scene with symbolism of agriculture and commerce, a plow, sheaf, cotton plant, and river boat. Blank back with depressed rounded channel, en verso. Approximately 21 mm dia. 2nd item: Virginia brass coat button, 2-piece construction, depicting the Virginia state seal, Virtus slaying the tyrant with sword down. Manufacturer’s marks Steele & Johnson stamped, en verso. Approximately 22 mm dia. 3rd item: North Carolina brass coat button, 2-piece construction, depicting the North Carolina state seal, the goddesses Liberty and Plenty. Manufacturer’s marks S A Myers Richmond VA embossed, en verso. Approximately 23 mm dia. 4th item: Kentucky brass coat button, 3-piece construction, depicting the Kentucky state seal, two figures shaking hands on a lined background. “Superior Quality” embossed, en verso. Approximately 22 mm dia. Provenance: The collection of internationally known ragtime pianist and historian Johnny Maddox, Gallatin, TN. CONDITION: Overall good, nondug condition with some minute areas of oxidation. All shanks present. 1st item: Shank slightly loose. Areas of tarnish, en verso. 3rd item: Areas of tarnish, en verso. 4th item: 1/8″ dent, center of button. [See more photos →]

$12,000.00
Lot 269: Confederate LA Officer's Sword Belt with Plate on Leather Confederate LA Officer's Sword Belt with Plate on Leather Lot 269: Confederate LA Officer's Sword Belt with Plate on Leather

Confederate Louisiana Officer's Sword belt with plate on original leather. 2-piece gilt cast brass waist belt plate with round keepers, applied die-struck tongue medallion depicting the state seal of Louisiana, a pelican feeding her young, surrounded by concentric rings to wreath. Partially illegible tag affixed to the inside of the belt which indicates capture at Shilow (Shiloh). Includes retail listings from Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques and Cliff Sophia, CS Arms with additional photographs. Plate approximately 52 mm (2.05") (53 mm tongue (2.09")) x 92 mm (3.62"). Wreath height Ð 57 mm (2.24"). Belt length approximately 31". Provenance: Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques. Purchased from Cliff Sophia, CS Arms. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: Thought to be made by Dufihlo of New Orleans. See: "Confederate Belt Buckles and Plates" by Steve E. Mullinax, 1999, page 151-154. CONDITION: The buckle exhibits fine untouched patina; the belt is solid and pliable but does have two partial tears that have been repaired. The belt originally had sword hangers which were removed at some point. [See more photos →]

$11,400.00
Lot 59: Capt. Oliver Pinkney McCammon Civil War Archive Capt. Oliver Pinkney McCammon Civil War Archive Lot 59: Capt. Oliver Pinkney McCammon Civil War Archive

A freshly discovered and extensive Civil War archive relating to Captain Oliver Pinkney McCammon (O.P.M.) of the 3rd East Tennessee Cavalry, Company L, also relating to the explosion of The Sultana and campaigns in Tennessee. Over 120 items, mostly letters of correspondence between Captain Pinkney (1840-1897, Blount Co.,TN) and his future wife, A. E. McCall of Blount Co., during the war years of 1861-1865. Archive also contains additional letters of correspondence between Captain Pinkney and his father, the men in his regiment, and others. This lot also contains a small circular tintype of McCammon in uniform and an amber “Union” bottle from the war period. An overview of content includes McCammon’s discussion of military campaigns in Middle Tennessee including engagements with General Wheeler and Hood, capture of his regiment by General Forest in September of 1864 and his subsequent escape, correspondence relating to the loss of several of his men on the ill-fated Sultana steamboat, discussion of guerilla attacks by Rebels in East Tennessee by A. E. McCall and his father, discussion of local and national political matters, smallpox breakouts in the camps, and an ongoing written courtship between McCammon and his future wife, Ann E. McCall. The archive contains letters such as the poignant correspondence written Nov. 20, 1864 from Susan Fowler to Captain McCammon on the report her son, Andrew Fowler, who was taken prisoner by the Confederates. She writes, ìit is a consolation to know that he (Andrew) is not numbered with the dead. I hope the time will soon come for him to return under your command as Andrew is all the support I have his father having died since he went away and left me with four children to take of. I hope God will spare him to be an honor to his country & a blessing to meÖî (note ñ an A. Fowler from the 3rd Tennessee Cavalry is listed as killed on the Sultana in April 1865). An earlier January 1863 letter from Captain McCammon reviews the remaining carnage of the Shiloh battlefield over 7 months later, ìwe stopped at Cornith overnight. Near the long to be remembered Battle Ground of Shiloh, which place still bears witness of the vanity of life. Fragments of garments and the skeletons of the dashing cavalry horses are not all the marks yet remaining of warís wild rage, for human skulls are by no means scarce, upon the surface…î An excerpt from a Nov. 1864 written by Capt. McCammon discusses the capture of men in his regiment, ìIt turns out that Joshua Hines is not dead but is a prisoner in the Rebelís hands, so says a Report brought through by the Sutler of our RegtÖ Our Boys are at Cahaba, Ala & were in tolerably good health. When he left though living upon very scanty rations. Well, we have about one hundred and twenty five men here as the representatives of eleven companies & I believe my own Company came though best of any, having thirty five me including a few that were not captured, & those who were and have since made their escape. (Note ñ A. J. Hines from the regiment is later listed as killed on the Sultana). A later letter May 1865 McCammon writes, ìThe last few days have been truly days of anxiety with us–in relation to the boys of our Regiment who had been in Rebel Prison, — whom it seems were aboard–(The Steamer Sultana) –at the time of the explosion the number of our boys rescued from the sad condition into which they were thrown by the occurrence of the disaster, amounts to about one hundred and forty among which I noticed the names of Bart McMurray, Sam Pickens, Van Headrick, Pat Ray, Wm Hill, James Baker and two of the Pryor Boys.—I believe this includes the Majority of those saved that you would likely know.— Alexander McCammon died on a boat near St. Louis, Mo. Sometime previous to the above mentioned accident…î McCammons future wife, Ann McCall writes him from East Tennessee in November of 1864, ìì…things appear somewhat in a bad fix tho I hope it will not be in as bad a fix as some think it is, it is true that some of them is in bad fix they have had to leave home to go into the Southern Army their was only fifteen passed here to day in some company some from Jeferson and some from Blount and how many more is runing I canít tell. General Gillam had a fight at the Gap and got his forse scattered and they are runing everwhere their was three of them here this evening hunting their way to Knoxville. It is reported that they have been fighting at Strawberry Plains yesterday. I canít tell how true it is I recon Naughn A Brachinridge is up their some plase from the account that some of them gives that has run from up their some of them say that they havenít slept in their oun house for four months. What this country is going to turn to I canít tell they get worse ever day their is a farsed? that bellong to no army they just go about and ___ peopleís houses and steal anything they want…î Correspondence from a cousin of Ann McCall in February of 1864, ìit looks like the rebs and negros will take this plase after while the rebs is coming in daly and joining our regiment som of them think will do while others wont. Blont (Blount) Co. is very well represented(sp?)Öwe hear now our forces hav fel back to Noxville and Marville . I donít like that if we can hold thare a monthÖî Captain McCammon writes in September 1863, ìI should have been much pleased to enter my own County seat (Blount Co., TN) with the first Blue Coats, but as we are under the command of Rosecrans & it fell to the Col. of Burnsides to possess that country with federal forces, we have been deprived of that pleasure. To get revenge the boys went guerrilla hunting the other data & brought in twelve of the thieving scoundrels who were prowling about recruiting some thirty miles from here. ì A January 1865 letter from Captain McCammon near Nashville discusses the state of the Confederate cause – ìThe Rebel Army, of the West, utterly demoralized, disorganized, & almost Panic Stricken. General Sherman has Marched Victoriously through Georgia & Captured enough of Rebel property in Savannah to pay the entire expense of the campaign, – Whilst the Army of the East holds Lee at the gates of Richmond as a Sentinel giving but little time to contemplate any aggressive act whatever.î In addition to the letters, the majority retain the original envelopes and postmarks, a handful of other letters from friends and family members are post 1865. Provenance: Consignor is a direct descendant of McCammon; descended in his family. Condition: Expected toning and discoloration, few with minor edge losses, but all letters readable and in generally good condition. [See more photos →]

$10,440.00
Lot 506: Lewis M. Coleman Photographic & Memorial Archive Lewis M. Coleman Photographic & Memorial Archive Lot 506: Lewis M. Coleman Photographic & Memorial Archive

Lewis Minor Coleman (Virginia, 1827-1863) photographic and memorial archive. 1st item: Sixth-plate tintype of Lewis Minor Coleman attired in his CSA uniform. Housed in a tooled leather case, 1/2″ x 3 3/4″ x 3 1/4″. 2nd item: Cabinet card photo by A.W. Judd (1846-1929), Chattanooga, Tennessee depicting Lewis Minor Coleman accompanied by two aunts and another female family member. 5 1/2″ H x 6 3/4″ W. 3rd item: W. A. Pratt, Richmond, VA quarter-plate daguerreotype of Lewis Minor Coleman housed in a tooled leather case, 1/2″ x 4 3/4″ x 3 3/4″. 4th item: G. W. Minnis, Richmond, VA cabinet card of Lewis Minor Coleman attired in his CSA uniform, inscribed en verso, Lewis Minor Coleman I, Lt. Col. 1st Va. Artillery, C. S. A., 3 1/4″ x 2 1/4″. 5th item: Victorian oval gold plated mourning/memorial brooch, laurel and oak leaf detail, with inscription en verso reading “LMC died March 21st, 1863″, 1 1/4″ x 1 3/8″. 6th item: Victorian oval gold plated swivel double sided mourning/memorial brooch with swirl rope frame, not engraved but belonging to Lewis Minor Coleman, 1 1/2″ x 1 1/4”. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN. Descended in the family of Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman (1827-1863) and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. Biography: “Coleman, Lewis Minor, born in Hanover county, Virginia, February 3, 1827; graduated with high honors at the University of Virginia in 1846, and became principal of the Hanover Academy; in 1859, upon the resignation of Dr. Harrison from the chair of ancient languages in the University of Virginia, Mr. Coleman, who had been a pupil of Dr. Harrison, was elected professor of Latin, and relinquished his position in the Hanover Academy to accept the same; he served in that capacity but for two years, for in 1861, at the outbreak of the civil war, he joined the ranks of the Confederate army, in which he enlisted as captain of an artillery company which he recruited; he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel of artillery in 1862; at the battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, he was severely wounded, and after three months died from his injury, March 21, 1863”. (Information according to Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume III, By: Lyon Gardiner Tyler, LL. D., Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York 1915). See other lots related to this family in this auction. CONDITION: 1st item: Tintype not mounted into case, case split in half, general wear. 2nd item: Overall toning. 3rd item: Wear to case, image very good condition. 4th item: Fading, toning and wear to image. 5th & 6th items: Overall very good condition with minor wear. [See more photos →]

$10,240.00
Lot 491: Rare 38 Floral Star American Flag Rare 38 Floral Star American Flag Lot 491: Rare 38 Floral Star American Flag

American 38-star flag, linen with printed stars arranged in an unusual floral pattern in the canton. No maker’s marks. Housed under glass in a wooden frame with gilt wood rabbet edge. Flag – 13″ H x 21 1/2″ W. Sight – 14 1/2″ H x 23″ W. Framed – 19 3/4″ H x 28 1/4″ W. Late 19th century. Provenance: Private Crossville, TN collection. Note: Letter in which Jeffrey Kenneth Kohn, M.D., Elkins Park, PA, the original dealer of the flag, writes to the consignor describing the rarity of the flag, stating that “I have never before seen this configuration of 4 clusters of 8 stars between, all encirling a star within a star. There is nothing like it in the Mastai book but if you have the Sotheby’s Mastai Auction catalog there is a similar larger sewn flag that has just 4 clusters of stars but no ‘star within a star'” included in the photos. CONDITION: Overall good condition. 1 1/4″ area of loss, top left of canton. Holes, largest 1/2″, surface of flag. 1/2″ x 1/2″ area of repair, lower center of flag. [See more photos →]

$10,240.00
Lot 35: Southern Landscape, View of Cumberland Gap Southern Landscape, View of Cumberland Gap Lot 35: Southern Landscape, View of Cumberland Gap

Southern landscape painting, oil on canvas, depicting a view of Cumberland Gap with mountains and log structures. Signed “O.M. ’97” lower left. The painting depicts the evacuation of the Cumberland Gap by the 7th Division of the Army of the Ohio. The Cumberland Gap was occupied by the Confederates until June of 1862. The Union Army then occupied the gap until September, 17th 1863. It is believed that the house in the foreground was the headquarters of Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird of the 27th brigade with the tents surrounding the home belonging to the 14th Kentucky infantry. It is likely that the painting is based off of a Civil War era print. Sight – 21 1/4″ H x 26 7/8″ W. Framed – 26 1/4″ H x 32″ W. Late 19th century. Provenance: Collection of Grace Tankersley, Knoxville, TN., purchased from Carole Wahler. Condition: Cleaned with later frame, blacklighting did not reveal any inpainting or repairs. [See more photos →]

$9,976.00
Lot 267: Confederate Richmond, VA R.H. Bosher Leather Belt with Buckle Confederate Richmond, VA R.H. Bosher Leather Belt with Buckle Lot 267: Confederate Richmond, VA R.H. Bosher Leather Belt with Buckle

Confederate Richmond, Virginia R. H. Bosher Carriage Works original leather belt with fixed tongue frame buckle. 1-piece enlisted infantry sand cast brass "Beveled Edge" frame buckle on leather belt stamped "W. H. BOSHER CO." over "RICHMOND VA." on the front of the leather below the stitching for the buckle. Includes original retail listing from Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques with additional photographs. Buckle approximately 67 mm x 57 mm (2.64" x 2.24"). Belt length approximately 36 3/4". Provenance: Purchased from Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: See "Confederate Belt Buckles and Plates" by Steve E. Mullinax, 1999, pages 94-99, and "Collecting the Confederacy" by Shannon Pritchard, 2005, page 19. CONDITION: Overall the leather is strong; there is scarring on the leather where the points of the belt frame scratched the leather. Buckle in overall good condition. [See more photos →]

$9,000.00
Lot 496: Civil War era Confederate Parade Flag Civil War era Confederate Parade Flag Lot 496: Civil War era Confederate Parade Flag

Civil War era Confederate first national parade flag, consisting of 7 applied nine pointed paper stars in the canton on silk ground. Includes wooden parade stick with sewn loop for stick to edge of flag closest to canton. Flag – 5 3/4″ H x 10 1/4″ W. Parade stick – 14 7/8″ L. Provenance: Private Ringgold, Georgia collection; among items purchased in the 1960’s from the old location of the A. P. Stewart Chapter of the UDC (United Daughters of the Confederacy), formerly the Nathan Bedford Forrest UCV (United Confederate Veterans) home, St. Elmo, Chattanooga, TN. CONDITION: Fragile condition with foxing spots, dampstaining, to be expected from age. Areas of loss, largest 2″ H x 1/2″, to white center bar. Total of five stars not present to canton on either side of flag. [See more photos →]

$8,960.00
Lot 233: Cameo brooch of Randal McGavock by Saulini 1851 Cameo brooch of Randal McGavock by Saulini 1851 Lot 233: Cameo brooch of Randal McGavock by Saulini 1851
Important cameo brooch portrait of Confederate Colonel Randal McGavock, former mayor of Nashville, killed in the Civil War at the Battle of Raymond, Mississippi in 1863. Randal McGavock references in his journals having this cameo made in Rome (“Pen and Sword, the Life and Journals of Randal McGavock” by Herschel Gower). Randal quotes in his journal, “My cameo came in today and I think the artist has succeeded admirably in getting a good likeness.” The cameo is signed in the lower right corner “Saulini F. Roma 1851.” Gold setting tested as 18K. Total weight 23.1 grams. Attributed to the Saulini workshop in Rome. Tommaso Saulini (Italian, 1793-1864) and Luigi Saulini (1819-1883) were master cameo carvers from this workshop established in 1836. Tommaso was a renowned specialist in portraiture, both in hardstone and shell who produced sculptural engravings from his workshop in Via del Babuino in Rome. His son Luigi (1819-1883) engraved the portraits of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert and won a medal at the 1862 International Exhibition in London. Excellent condition with slight discoloration to area near ear. 2 3/8″ x 2″. Circa 1851. Lindsley Warden estate.

[See more photos →]

$8,730.00
Lot 177: Confederate Navy Archive of Lt. Dabney Scales in Europe & Other Confederate Navy Archive of Lt. Dabney Scales in Europe & Other Lot 177: Confederate Navy Archive of Lt. Dabney Scales in Europe & Other

Civil War archive of Confederate Navy Lieutenant Dabney Scales including an 1863 journal detailing Dabney Scales assignment in Europe (approx. 250 pages), Scale’s 1860 U.S. Practice Ship “Plymouth” log journal (188 pages), and a Scales family post-War accounting journal spanning from 1871-1882 in Memphis, TN. Biography of Dabney Scales – Dabney Minor Scales (1841-1920) of Memphis, TN was the son of Peter Scales, a planter from Virginia. Dabney attended the US Naval Academy and joined the Confederate Navy at the outbreak of the Civil War. He served on the CSS Savannah, CSS Capital, CSS Arkansas, CSS Atlanta, and the CSS Shenandoah. In 1863-4, Scales was assigned to Europe and spent time in London and Paris regarding the outfitting and manning of Confederate ships constructed in England. After the Civil War, Dabney Scales lived in Mexico a short period before returning to Memphis to practice law. Dabney was elected to the Tennessee legislature and served in the Tennessee State Senate. In the Spanish-American War, he served as a lieutenant during the conflict. 1st item – 1863 journal detailing Dabney Scales’s assignment in Europe (approx. 250 pages) beginning April 24th, 1863 on Iron Clad “Atlanta” off Fort Jackson near Savannah, GA and concludes on March 26, 1864 in Paris, France. Highlights from this extensive diary include running the blockade of Charleston on the steamer, “Ella and Anna”. Scales writes of their voyage to Nassau, Havana, St. Thomas, and finally to Southhampton, England. Upon arriving in Paris with fellow officers of the Confederate Navy, he reviews his days “sight seeing” in the Paris environs while also commenting on the war news from home. There is considerable discussion about the CSS Florida at Brest and Scales has communications with some of the Florida officers by person or written correspondence through other shipmates. 2nd item – Dabney Scale’s 1860 U.S. Practice Ship “Plymouth” log journal (188 pages) from his period at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, June 25, 1860 to Setember 26, 1860. CONDITION: 1st item – covers lost, most of binding lost with several of the first 30 pages separated from binding. All very legible. 2nd item – Spine with losses, minor wear commensurate with age. 3rd item – post war accounting journal with losses to spine. [See more photos →]

$8,496.00
Lot 598: 2 Flintlock Pistols, Gen. Jackson, Ambrister and Arbuthnot history 2 Flintlock Pistols, Gen. Jackson, Ambrister and Arbuthnot history Lot 598: 2 Flintlock Pistols, Gen. Jackson, Ambrister and Arbuthnot history

Two (2) European flintlock pistols, history of ownership in the family of President Andrew Jackson, who is said to have seized the guns from Robert Christie Ambrister (1797-1818) and Alexander (George) Arbuthnot (1748-1818) during the First Seminole War. The two British citizens were captured and charged with aiding the Seminole and Creek Indians against the United States, and executed by then-General Jackson near what is still known today as Court Martial Lake, Florida. The "Ambrister and Arbuthnot Incident" triggered a Congressional investigation, the findings of which were critical of Jackson's actions, but did not result in censure. Lot is accompanied by a 1954 sworn affadavit from the pistols' late owner, Stanley Horn of Nashville, stating that according to Donelson family tradition, the firearms were given by Jackson to his friend and aide, General John Coffee, who later gifted the pistols to Jackson's adopted son, Major Andrew Jackson Donelson. Major Donelson bequeathed them to his son, William Donelson, who sold them to a Nashville bookseller, Paul Hunter, who in turn sold them to Mr. Horn; they have descended in the family of Stanley Horn to the present consignor. Lot also includes two framed Kellogg prints of Jackson. 1st item: 62 cal. holster flintlock pistol with scimitar inlay. 19" overall, 11 3/4" smooth bore barrel. Brass furniture including trigger guard with repair, escutcheon plate, front blade, and sight thimble. Repousse of scimitar on right side of stock. Flintlock ignition is unaltered. Barrel has minimal decoration at breech with foliate outline, spine on top of barrel has engraving extending from breech to front sight. Front band is missing, has period repair with brass wire. The stock has carved design from front to rear. Stock is missing 4 1/2" splinter, and 1/8" just beneath the barrel. Escutcheon plate is plain and crude, possibly a period replacement. The lock appears functional, and the striker plate is grooved. Period decoration on the butt and crude inlay on the bottom. The ramrod is period and possibly original. The action only goes to half cock. 2nd item: 65 cal. Holster flintlock pistol. 18 1/2" overall, 12" smooth bore barrel. Brass furniture including front band, ramrod thimble, trigger guard, pierced escutcheon plate, pierced decorative inlay in rear, and brass butt plate. Wood broken in front of lock with period repair using a brass sheet and tacks. Light engraving on the trigger guard, escutcheon plate, back of stock, and there appears to be light engraving on ramrod thimble. Linear design on band that attaches barrel to stock. Tang and breech have engraved decoration, foliate engraving with deep impressed cartouche at breech of barrel. Trigger guard with light engraving to hammer and lock plate with matching engraving. 3" from breech has what appear to be a maker's mark. The striker plate has been replaced with a plate attached with two iron brads. Action goes to full and half cock. Does not appear to have been cleaned. Has minimal carving to stock. 3rd item: Framed affadavit with black and white photographs of the guns in this lot, signed by Stanley Horn and notarized, matted and framed (16" x 13" overall). 4th item: Lithograph, Silhouette of Andrew Jackson, Taken From Life, by Wm. H. Brown. Printed by E.B. & E.C.Kellogg. 16" H x 12" W sight, 17 1/2" H x 13 1/2" W in narrow black wood frame. Condition: Toning. 5th item: Lithograph, Gen. Andrew Jackson the Hero of New Orleans, printed by E.B. & E.C. Kellogg, 16 3/4" x 10" sight, in period veneered wooden frame, 22" x 15 1/2". Condition: heavy toning, 1" tear at top margin, losses to frame. Provenance: the estate of Stanley Horn, Nashville, Tennessee, by descent in his family to current consignor. CONDITION: See item description. [See more photos →]

$7,800.00
Lot 324: Confederate Thomas Griswold Saber Bayonet Confederate Thomas Griswold Saber Bayonet Lot 324: Confederate Thomas Griswold Saber Bayonet

Rare Confederate Thomas Griswold Confederate Saber Bayonet. Brass and checkered wooden grips, brass attachment ring at the cross guard, blade with flat back and curved single edge. Ricasso marked in full, firm stamp “THOMAS GRISWOLD & CO. NEW ORLEANS” in an arch. Blade length – 22 3/4″. Overall length – 28 1/2″. Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: This Thomas Griswold Confederate saber bayonet is the single rarest maker marked Confederate bayonet. Only one other marked example is known. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. The blade is gray with minimal pitting and a slight casting flaw. The grip is brass with checkered wood showing very little wear and is well pinned to the tang. [See more photos →]

$7,200.00
Lot 307: Marlin Special Order Deluxe Rifle, Model 1893 Marlin Special Order Deluxe Rifle, Model 1893 Lot 307: Marlin Special Order Deluxe Rifle, Model 1893

Marlin Model 1893 Engraved Special Order Lever Action Rifle, .38-.55 caliber, serial number 139497, under receiver just behind forestock. Figured and flame grain American walnut straight stock with “A” style checking, serpentine pistol grip stock and crescent buttplate. Factory engraving on barrel and receiver including running elk in a circle surrounded by scroll and border engraving on left side of receiver, and a standing buck deer in a circle surrounded by scroll and border engraving on right side. 26″ octagon to round barrel stamped, MARLIN FIRE-ARMS CO. NEW-HAVEN, CT. U.S.A. PATENTED. OCT. 11. 1887. APRIL 2. 1889. AUGUST 1. 1893. Adjustable sight stamped MARBLE’S GLADSTONE MICH. U.S.A. Lyman front sight stamped PAT. JAN. 29. 79 – MAY. 6. 87. Overall length – 44 5/8″. Black and tan snakeskin case included. CONDITION: Faint case coloring. Divot in top of barrel. Bore is good, no pitting, standard size. Original stock has numerous scattered dents and dings. [See more photos →]

$7,080.00
Lot 178: Large 1910 TN Appalachian Expo. Still Life by Mayme Freeman Large 1910 TN Appalachian Expo. Still Life by Mayme Freeman Lot 178: Large 1910 TN Appalachian Expo. Still Life by Mayme Freeman

Monumentally large East Tennessee still life oil on canvas titled, “1815” by Mayme A. Freeman (Knoxville, TN, b. 1884). This work was exhibited in the Appalachian Exposition of 1910 held in Knoxville, Tennessee and retains the exhibition number in the lower left corner, “278”. The still life depicts a cabin mantel with a full stock, flintlock long rifle, powder horn, and leather pouch. A large stoneware jug and an almanac, Webster_s letter book, are also displayed upon the mantel. A key, iron skimmer, and dried peppers hang on the wall below the rifle. Housed in a dark wooden frame with mounted wooden plaque listing title and artist. This work is listed in the “Catalogue Fine Arts Section Appalachian Exposition”, p. 69. Sight – 39 5/8″ H x 71 3/4″ W. Framed – 48 3/4″ H x 80 3/4″ W. Biography: Mayme A. Freeman was listed in a Knoxville, TN 1904 U. S. City Directory under Artists. She was the niece of the famous Knoxville, TN artist Enoch Lloyd Branson (Tennessee, 1853-1925). Her mother was Susan E. Freeman (Branson) daughter of Enoch Branson, sister of Enoch Lloyd Branson. Provenance: Descendant of Branson family. Note: Another Appalachian Exposition still life, Lot 206: 1910 Appalachian Expo. Still Life by Mayme Freeman was sold in our July 30th, 2016 sale. CONDITION: Some exfoliation and water or solvent drips to center, left margin and left lower corner. Surface grime and light overall craquelure. Rubbing and losses to edges with some scattered losses. [See more photos →]

$7,080.00
Lot 299: Confederate Blockade Run Kerr Revolver, SN 1269 Confederate Blockade Run Kerr Revolver, SN 1269 Lot 299: Confederate Blockade Run Kerr Revolver, SN 1269

Confederate blockade-run Kerr Revolver, Serial number 1269, 54 bore (about 44cal). All visible serial numbers matching. Left side of barrel marked "LAC", left side of frame marked "London Armory", right side of frame marked "Kerr's Patent 1269", lock plate marked "London Armoury", tang clearly marked with Confederate or English inspection stamp "JS/(anchor)", cylinder with serial number and standard British proof marks. Checkered English walnut stocks, octagonal barrel, iron mounted, checkered hammer, loading lever, butt plate with lanyard ring. Six pages of previous sale record in three plastic binder sleeves included in this lot. Barrel length – 5 3/4". Overall length – 11". Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: See "The English Connection" by Russ A. Pritchard and Cleveland Adger Huey, 2014, p. 112-133. CONDITION: Action holds at full cock. Some finish remaining on barrel and mountings. Rifling to bore. Checkering on stocks are well defined. [See more photos →]

$6,400.00
Lot 298: Hyde & Goodrich New Orleans Agent Marked Tranter Revolver, SN 8803 Hyde & Goodrich New Orleans Agent Marked Tranter Revolver, SN 8803 Lot 298: Hyde & Goodrich New Orleans Agent Marked Tranter Revolver, SN 8803

Hyde and Goodrich New Orleans agent marked large frame cased Tranter revolver, serial number 8803, .45 caliber. Top of barrel and breech marked "W. Tranters Patent Hyde & Goodrich Agents for the United States South", left side of side-mounted loading lever and double trigger marked "W. Tranter Patent", right side of frame marked with serial number, cylinder marked with proper British proof marks. Checkered English walnut stocks, octagonal barrel, iron mounted with foliate engravings, side-mounted loading lever, standard front sight. Housed in a standard English Oak case with brass escutcheons, relined with green felt, containing Tranter's Patent items including a double cavity flask, cleaning rod, nipple wrench and screw driver (possibly not original to set), and tins of lubricating caps, composition, and candle wax, and James Dixon and Sons Sheffield bag flask and oilier. Includes three ring binder with College Hill Arsenal previous sale record. Barrel length – 6". Overall length – 12". Case – 2 1/2" H x 14 3/4" W x 7 7/8" D. Provenance: Purchased from College Hill Arsenal. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. CONDITION: Double action works well. Engravings highly visible. Checkering to stocks well defined. Some finish on metal. Case in overall good condition. [See more photos →]

$5,760.00
Lot 300: Kerr's Patent Revolver, .SN 6876, Alabama Soldier History Kerr's Patent Revolver, .SN 6876, Alabama Soldier History Lot 300: Kerr's Patent Revolver, .SN 6876, Alabama Soldier History

London Armoury Company Kerr's Patent Single Action Percussion Revolver, .45 caliber, serial number 6876, all visible serial numbers matching. Purported history to William Black, Company H, 3rd Alabama Cavalry, the Prattville Dragoons, a Company of men from the city of Prattville, and Autauga County, Alabama, organized for service during the American Civil War of 1861-1865 (purchased from a William Black descendent in Mobile, Alabama). Left side of barrel marked "LAC", left side of frame marked "London Armory", right side of frame marked "Kerr's Patent 6876", lock plate marked "London Armoury Co", cartouche with initials "AVC", butt plate marked "Wm. Black", standard British proof marks. Checkered English walnut stocks, octagonal barrel, iron mounted, checkered hammer, loading lever, butt plate with lanyard ring. Three ring binder containing letter from John Spicer, Champion Hill Relics about the gun, dated April 2, 2016 and complete history of Black included with lot. Barrel length – 6". Overall length – 11 1/2". Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. CONDITION: Action holds at full cock, trigger is loose. No finish remaining to mountings. Checkering on stocks are well defined. Areas of loss to trigger guard. [See more photos →]

$5,632.00
Lot 617: George A. Pierce WWII Bomber Jacket Archive George A. Pierce WWII Bomber Jacket Archive Lot 617: George A. Pierce WWII Bomber Jacket Archive

Technical Sergeant George A. Pierce WWII archive. Sargeant Pierce flew 31 missions on the B-17 bomber “Bags Inc.” in the European theater. The leather jacket is decorated with a pin-up girl surrounded by “Bags Inc. Ceiling Zero” with 31 bombs stating the different cities bombed. The jacket is a size 40 A-2 military issued jacket. Included is Sargeant Pierce’s framed bomber wings, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, and ribbons for Army good conduct, Asiatic-Pacific campaign, European-Africa Middle Eastern campaign, and his honorable discharge card. Also included is a picture of Sergeant Pierce with his crew standing next to a B-17 and a portrait of him in dress uniform. Medals framed: 10-1/4″ H x 8-1/4″ W. Crew framed: 10-3/4″ H x 12-3/4″ W. Portrait framed: 15-1/2″ H x 12-1/2″ W. Biography: George A. Pierce (1917-1969) was raised in Knox County, Tennessee. He enlisted on January 23, 1941 with his two brothers, Ira S. Pierce and S. Pierce, who were also airmen. Condition: Some overall wear to jacket, fraying to fabric at end of sleeves. [See more photos →]

$5,568.00
Lot 295: Confederate Blockade Run 1862 Enfield Tower Rifled Musket, .577 caliber Confederate Blockade Run 1862 Enfield Tower Rifled Musket, .577 caliber Lot 295: Confederate Blockade Run 1862 Enfield Tower Rifled Musket, .577 caliber

Civil War Confederate Blockade Run 1862 Pattern Enfield Tower rifled musket, .577 caliber. Lock plate marked "Tower 1862" with crown, breech marked with "25" proof marks, bottom of butt stock comb marked with Confederate or English inspection stamp "JS/(anchor)", butt plate with hand engraved serial number "6273/A". Walnut stock, brass butt plate, trigger guard, and fore end tip, iron barrel bands, inlaid iron escutcheons, proper ramrod #1347. Also included is an original document dated March 17, 1862 signed by Gen. John C. Breckenridge to Capt. Brewster a request for 600 Enfield rifles, possible including this rifle. Barrel length – 39". Overall length – 55". Note: See "The English Connection" by Russ A. Pritchard and Cleveland Adger Huey, 2014, p. 112-133. Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. CONDITION: Action is excellent. Barrel cleaned approximately 50 years ago, starting to assume patina. Breech of barrel with moderate pitting, balance of barrel smooth with numerous dings, sling swivels are missing, stock worn smooth with numerous usage and storage dings. Stock is cracked at breech extending 1 1/4" to the escutcheon on left side. [See more photos →]

$5,520.00
Lot 129: Civil War Tin Type East TN Soldier, Sirenius Mort Civil War Tin Type East TN Soldier, Sirenius Mort Lot 129: Civil War Tin Type East TN Soldier, Sirenius Mort

Civil War tin type of Union soldier, Sirenius M. Mort, a member of the Mort pottery family of Jefferson County, Tennessee. Mort is shown seated in his uniform holding a sword with tinted highlights to his face, uniform buttons and chestbelt. Housed in original gutta percha case with embossed patriotic symbols including an eagle and American flag to exterior. Overall very good condition with some light spotting to image and discoloration to left side of gold matte frame.Case measures 3 3/4″ H x 3 3/8″ W. Mid 19th century. Provenance: In addition to being a member of the Mort pottery family of Jefferson County, Tennessee, Sirenius M. Mort also served as a 1st Lieutenant with the 9th Tennessee Cavalry Volunteers, Company F, during the Civil War. He died on July 15, 1869 of an apparent sunstroke. A period newspaper clipping accompanies this lot which details his death and discusses the “Tribute of Respects” given by the ex-soldiers who servedwith him. [See more photos →]

$5,290.00
Lot 494: Solomon Reed Full Stock Percussion Long Rifle, .40 Cal. Solomon Reed Full Stock Percussion Long Rifle, .40 Cal. Lot 494: Solomon Reed Full Stock Percussion Long Rifle, .40 Cal.

Full stock long rifle, .40 caliber. Barrel marked “Solomon Reed” in script lettering. Foliate engraving on lock plate. Walnut stocks, metal frame with iron mounts, octagonal barrel, cigar patch box, wooden ram rod. Standard sights. Barrel length – 45″. Overall length – 60″. Provenance: Private Knox County, TN collection. Note: Solomon Reed was born in 1791 and served as a Private in East Tennessee Volunteers in the War of 1812. In the 1820 census he was in Greene County, Tennessee, producing 20 guns at $20, 40 barrels at $10, using a hand-powered mill (Information according to “Notes on Southern Long Rifles” by Jerry Noble). CONDITION: Lock is converted to percussion. Stock is refinished. 2 3/4″ hairline right side of forestock and old slender patch, various storage dings and surface abrasions. Minor oxidation to barrel and lock plate. Few nails on forestock not flush or missing. Action is good. Bore is dark. [See more photos →]

$5,280.00
Lot 608: 1866 Photograph of Robert E. Lee, Brady & Co. Presentation Inscription 1866 Photograph of Robert E. Lee, Brady & Co. Presentation Inscription Lot 608: 1866 Photograph of Robert E. Lee, Brady & Co. Presentation Inscription

Circa 1866 albumen photograph of Confederate General Robert E. Lee with inscription in pen below, reading "To the Editor's of Harper's Weekly with compliments Brady & Co. Washington DC." Oval photograph (8" H x 6 1/4" W) adhered to Brady & Co. mount (12" H x 10" W) with gilt oval surround and lettering. Pencil inscription upper left, "Please return to Geo. Custis" and upper right, partially illegible,"Robert E. Lee the rebel General___". This scarce image of Lee in civilian clothing, seated beside a table in an ornate chair, was one of six exposures made of Lee by the esteemed photographer Mathew Brady in Washington in 1866. The image appeared as a wood engraving in Harper's issue dated April 14, 1866 with the caption "Robert E. Lee in Civilian Life." Since Robert E. Lee's father in law George Washington Park Custis died well before the Civil War, the pencil inscription more likely refers to George Washington Neale Custis, a Washington, D.C. physician and former railroad superintendant and member of the New Jersey House of Representatives (b.1830-d. 1917). Provenance: the estate of Stanley Horn, Nashville, Tennessee, by descent in his family to current consignor. CONDITION: Significant foxing and toning. Upper edge adhered to backing board. 3 small pinholes to area of mount immediately surrounding the photograph, small scattered stains, and a 1/2" tear at right edge, center mount. [See more photos →]

$5,120.00
Lot 826: Winchester Model 1895 -7.62x54R Lever Action Rifle Winchester Model 1895 -7.62x54R Lever Action Rifle Lot 826: Winchester Model 1895 -7.62x54R Lever Action Rifle

Winchester Russian Model 1895 musket, 7.62mm Cartridge. Serial number 223501B. Lock plate marked, “MANUFACTURED BY THE WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. NEW HAVEN CONN. U.S.A. PATENTED NOV. 5. 95. AUG. 17. 97. JAN. 25. 98. AUG. 23. 98. AUG 6. 1907.”. Tang marked, “Model 1892 Winchester Trade Mark REG. IN U.S. PAT. OFF. & FGN.”. Greek Cross insignia inlaid, left side of butt, compass, right side of butt. Walnut stocks, metal frame, round barrel. Standard sights. Barrel length – 28″. Overall length – 46″. Serial number corresponds to year 1916. CONDITION: Gun has been sporterized by removing front of forearm past the first barrel band. Remaining forearm has been checkered. Name and address of former owner has been applied to the magazine with electric pen. Silver plate with former owner’s name placed in the wrist. Proper butt plate with cleaning lanyard in the butt. Bore is OK but dark. Little original finish remains. Excellent mechanical. [See more photos →]

$5,040.00
Lot 260: 3 John S. Mosby ALS, 2 Colored Lithos – 5 items 3 John S. Mosby ALS, 2 Colored Lithos – 5 items Lot 260: 3 John S. Mosby ALS, 2 Colored Lithos – 5 items

Archive of five (5) items related to John Singleton Mosby, the Confederate "Gray Ghost," including three (3) ALS and two (2) colored lithographs illustrating a raid orchestrated by his command, the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, known as Mosby's Rangers or Mosby's Raiders, on Sheridan's supply train. 1st-3rd items: Three (3) ALS. One page handwritten bifoliums. From John Singleton Mosby, at the time of the letters a lawyer for the Southern Pacific Railroad, San Francisco, CA, to Mrs. J. D. Herblin, his cousin, Nashville, Tennessee. 1st item: Letter dated June 1, 1899. Mosby describes three reproduced illustrations of paintings depicting events that occured during his time in Mosby's Rangers, writing "My dear Cousin–As you have shown some interest in my military record I send you by mail three pictures illustrating scenes through wh[ich] I passed. They are copied from paintings made in Paris 30 years ago by [Henri Felix Emmanuel] Philippoteaux a celebrated battle scene painter–These pictures were taken in Japan and colored there. The first represents us about Sundown on the evening of August 12th 1864 just as we had passed through the right bank of the Shenandoah that flows along its base. I am on a gray horse in front just under a tree with my right hand pointing while talking to one of my scouts (Lieutenant John Singleton Russell) who is also on a grey horse. The officer who is pointing towards the guard evidently giving orders in Capt: Sam Chapman–Since the war he has been a Baptist minister preacher–McKinley appointed him a Chaplain & sent him to Cuba–In No 2–the attack on Sheridan's train–I am in the front near the howitzer that is firing on the guard for the train–The attack was on the Valley pike–the guard consisted of about 3000 men–there was a heavy fog–I has about 300 men & one gun–the first notice they had of our presence was when a shell dropped in their column & knocked off the head of mule & this stopped the train–The Yankees did not think it was fair for 300 men to attacked 3000 in a fog–So they ran away & left everything–wagons–mules–beef cattle–We got General [Wesley] Merritt's (the same who went to Manila) headquarter teams–with his baggage were several violins–There were several fiddlers among my men–who played tunes on the violin–In this picture (No 3) I am mounted on a grey horse–immediately to my right & rear is my brother [Lieutenant Colonel William Harrison] Mosby who was my Adjutant–he is eleven years my junior–The officer standing on my left is [Lieutenant Colonel William Henry] Chapman]–he was appointed to my office at my request by [General Ulysses S.] Grant–is still in office–Special Agent…The officer in front (mounted) is Major [A. E.] Richard–now Judge Richards of Louisville, Ky–the officer to whom he is talking is Lieut: Ben Palmer of Richmond–the officer sitting down is Capt: Mountjoy who was killed a few weeks afterwards–of course you can distinguish the Yankee prisoners–I took more prisoners than I had men–As you take an interest in "the east course" these pictures may interest you–Sincerely–Jno.S.Mosby". 2nd item: Letter dated June 28th, 1899. Mosby describes his past and upcoming literary projects, writing "My dear Cousin: I recd your letter today–also your husband's–Tomorrow I shall send you my photo as you request–The "War Reminiscences" you speak of were written by me shortly after my return from Hong Kong where I was consul nearly seven years: They were written by request for the Boston Herald & I had no idea when I was writing them that these fugitive sketches [would] ever be collected in book form. They contain only a small portion of my military life. Ch:XI (page 205) was a lecture delivered by me on Stuart's Cavalry at Tremont Temple, Boston, in December 1886. Three years ago one of my men [James Joseph Williamson] published a book–'Mosby's Rangers'–The publisher is Ralph B. Kenyon–New York–In the picture in this book of "We fight at Miskel's–you will recognize me in the act of shooting a falling Yankee–& the Rev: Sam Chapman with his sword suspended (in front) in the act of striking a Yankees. He was appointed Chaplain in Cuba–His son is here with me in the employment of the Southern Pacific Co. & runs on a steamer between here and Hong Kong. In the pictures I send you Captain Sam is in No I–behind me–pointing at the little howitzer–I intend soon to begin writing a complete memoir of my command–I got the picture also that your husband sent me–I hope some day to visit you–My kind regards to your family–Yours Sincerely Jno.S.Mosby". 3rd item: Letter dated July 11, 1899. Mosby begins the letter by writing "My dear Cousin: I have just recd your letter of the 5th–I have no sort of objection to the photo being engraved for the Confederate Veteran–I wish you [would] ask the Editor to send me a few copies–I want them for my children…". Mosby names his children, their spouses, and current locations before continuing "I read you grandfather's autobiography with great & returned you the paper. He was my mother's first cousin. You need not apologize for writing to me–I read your letters with the greatest interest–then forward them to [his daughters] Beverly–she forwards them to May–So they pass all around–Do you ever see my cousin–Mrs. Thorne? If you do remember me to her: She is related to me through the Mosby S. You spoke of being interested in the Rev: Sam (Captain) Chapman–whom I described in the Miskel fight hewing his way through the enemy's ranks. Since the war he has been a Baptist preacher–I got Grant to appoint him in the postal service–he held the position for 9 years. McKinley appointed him a Chaplain–he went to Cuba has been mustered out–Expects now to go to the Philippines. I brought his son out here & put him out on a steamship that was between this port & Hong Kong–He is here now & in my room last night–I told him what you said about his father–My kind regards to your family–Sincerely Jno.S.Mosby". All letters approximately 8" H x 10" W. Biography: John Singleton Mosby (1833-1916), also known by his nickname, the "Gray Ghost", was a Confederate army cavalry battalion commander in the American Civil War. His command, the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, known as Mosby's Rangers or Mosby's Raiders, was a partisan ranger unit noted for its lightning-quick raids and its ability to elude Union Army pursuers and disappear. After the war, Mosby became a Republican and worked as an attorney and supported his former enemy's commander, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant. He also served as the American consul to Hong Kong and in the U.S. Department of Justice. 4th-5th items: Two (2) colored lithographs after paintings by Henri Felix Emmanuel Philippoteaux (French, 1815-1884) titled "2 Mosby's battalion–Attack on Sheridan's Supply Train–Berryville Va–August 13 1864" and "3 Mosby's battalion–Attack on Sheridan's Wagon train–Berryville Va–Returning from the raid–August 13 1864–Shenandoah Valley". Both images illustrate a raid on Sheridan's supply train described in Mosby's letter dated June 1, 1899. Images mounted to off white card stock with title in Mosby's handwriting centered below, numbered, top left of card stock. Images – 4 3/8" H x 7 1/2" W. Card stock – 7 1/8" H x 10 1/8" W. Biography: Henri Felix Emmanuel Philippoteaux was born in Paris on April 3, 1815. When he was still young he entered the studio of Leon Cogniet, with whom, at a later period, he painted several battle scenes for the gallery at Versailles. He first exhibited at the Salon of 1833. His works could be found in the principal modern museums of France at the time, including those of the Luxembourg, Versailles, Rouen, Strasbourg, and Marseilles. He obtained medals in 1837, 1840, and was awarded the Legion d'honneur in 1846. Several noted pictures were painted upon commissions received after he traveled to Algiers. His works were also shown at the Royal Academy exhibition in London. (source: Obituary in "The New York Times", November 10, 1884). CONDITION: All items with toning, foxing spots, etc. to be expected from age. Mosby's signatures in excellent condition. Areas of acid burn to card stock. [See more photos →]

$5,040.00
Lot 494: Army of GA Soldiers Wanted Banner, circa 1864 Army of GA Soldiers Wanted Banner, circa 1864 Lot 494: Army of GA Soldiers Wanted Banner, circa 1864

Union Recruiting Banner, “Army of Georgia. Soldiers Wanted.” with Federal Eagle emblem to center of cloth banner. Housed under glass in a wooden frame with gilt wood rabbet edge. Banner – 21 3/4″ H x 40 3/4″ W. Sight – 25″ H x 44 1/4″ W. Framed – 28″ H x 47″ W. Circa 1864. Provenance: Private Ringgold, Georgia collection; among items purchased in the 1960’s from the old location of the A. P. Stewart Chapter of the UDC (United Daughters of the Confederacy), formerly the Nathan Bedford Forrest UCV (United Confederate Veterans) home, St. Elmo, Chattanooga, TN. Note: In November 1864, General Sherman created the Army of Georgia from the remaining XIV and XX Corps of the Army of the Cumberland. This army was commanded under Major General Henry Warner Slocum and served as one of Sherman’s wings in the March to the Sea. CONDITION: Overall good condition with foxing spots, stains, largest 2 1/8″ x 1 1/2″, tears, largest 1/2″, to be expected from age and manner of use. Areas of loss, 2 1/4″ x 1 3/4″ to top left of eagle’s wing and 1 1/2″ x 1 5/8″ area top left corner of banner. Top and left edges appear to be slightly cut down. Printed lettering and emblem in very good condition. [See more photos →]

$4,800.00
Lot 332: East Tennessee Samuel Bell Dagger Point Knife & Silver Scabbard East Tennessee Samuel Bell Dagger Point Knife & Silver Scabbard Lot 332: East Tennessee Samuel Bell Dagger Point Knife & Silver Scabbard

East Tennessee Mid-19th century Samuel Bell-style dagger point side knife with coin silver and ivory grip. Coin silver scabbard with fine scrolled, crosshatched and wiggle work engraving, leather lined. Blade length – 6 7/8". Overall length with scabbard – 11 1/4". Provenance: Private collection; acquired from a Newport, Tennessee family in 1972. CONDITION: Blade in overall good condition with few areas of light pitting. Areas of tarnish, dents to scabbard. Hairlines and yellowing due to age on hilt. [See more photos →]

$4,800.00
Lot 518: 1803 Harpers Ferry Rifle 1803 Harpers Ferry Rifle Lot 518: 1803 Harpers Ferry Rifle

Harper’s Ferry US Model 1803 flint lock rifle. One of 1600 made in 1814, the start of second generation of production. 65 caliber with seven groove rifling, 33-1/2″ long half octagon / half round barrel, barrel stamped sunken “US” and eagle over “P” proof marks. Reconverted to flint lock with reproduction lockplate marked HARPERS FERRY 1803 behind the hammer and American Eagle in front of the hammer. Walnut half stock with cheekrest and brass patch box. Markings on stock include PW 53 in front of the patch box, 53 above the patch box, E P above an E, and V TM on the reverse of the lock. 49-1/2″ total length. Also included is a 19th century leather shot pouch. 5-1/2″ H x 6-1/2″ W. Condition: Overall very good functioning condition. Replaced ramrod and lockplate, reconverted to flint, and patch to the stock above the cheek piece. Leather shot pouch has 1/4 of original strap, and has been resewn in some areas. [See more photos →]

$4,680.00
Lot 379: George III Regimental Drum and sticks George III Regimental Drum and sticks Lot 379: George III Regimental Drum and sticks

George III regimental painted drum, polychrome paint on oak frame with square nail construction and likely original rope tighteners; the front emblazoned with royal coat of arms and banner reading REGt XXXVI SECOND BATTALION on a green background; side campaign scrolls enclosing oval medallions with gilt lettering "VIIIth COMP." and "No. 1". Bronze colored metal stud design to side. Hide top and pair of wooden sticks. 17 1/4" H x 17 1/4" dia. English, third quarter 18th century. Provenance: a Middle Tennessee estate, by descent from Thomas G.B. Wheelock. Note: Thomas G.B. Wheelock was known as an astute collector of African Art and co-author of the book "Land of the Flying Masks: Art & Culture in Burkina Faso". He also inherited a sizeable collection of Asian, British, and military related antiques from his grandparents, Gilded Age tycoon George Briggs Buchanan of New York, and William and Margaret Wheelock, who owned a Scottish manor home known as Bunker Hill. (Margaret Carmichael Wheelock was also a founding partner of the fashion firm Farquharson & Wheelock in New York). See other related lots in this auction. CONDITION: Paint appears original and mostly intact. Losses, cracks and repairs to hide top. Missing neck strap. Ropes brittle and torn; some ropes may be missing. Hoops loose. Scattered shrinkage cracks. Sticks are mismatched and may not be original to drum. [See more photos →]

$4,608.00
Lot 268: Confederate Leech & Rigdon Waist Plate on Leather Sword Belt Confederate Leech & Rigdon Waist Plate on Leather Sword Belt Lot 268: Confederate Leech & Rigdon Waist Plate on Leather Sword Belt

Confederate Leech & Rigdon waist belt plate on original leather sword belt. 2-piece sand cast brass plain tongue plate, oak leaf wreath with embossed Leech & Rigdon "reverse L" patterns, top and bottom center. Includes original receipt and documentation from Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques. Plate approximately 50 mm x 91 mm (1.97" x 3.58"). Wreath height Ð 49 mm (1.93"). Belt length approximately 30". Provenance: Purchased from Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: See "Confederate Belt Buckles and Plates" by Steve E. Mullinax, 1999, page 35. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. Areas of tarnish to brass buckle. Missing hangers. [See more photos →]

$4,560.00
Lot 297: Colt Model 1851 Navy Revolver, .38 cal., T. H. Biscoe 5th LA Vols Colt Model 1851 Navy Revolver, .38 cal., T. H. Biscoe 5th LA Vols Lot 297: Colt Model 1851 Navy Revolver, .38 cal., T. H. Biscoe 5th LA Vols

Colt Model 1851 Navy Revolver, .38 caliber, serial number 97989, engraved on grip frame "T H Biscoe 5th LA Vols". All visible serial numbers matching. Belonged to Confederate Captain Thomas H. Biscoe, Company K, 5th Louisiana Volunteer Infantry, organized in New Orleans, Louisiana, in May 1861. Barrel marked "Address Saml. Colt Hartford CT.", cylinder marked "Colt's Patent No. 97989", left side of frame marked "Colts Patent", inscription on the back strap and butt strap reads "T. H. Biscoe 5th La. Vol." and "Forever Ashley". Walnut stocks, octagonal barrel, brass trigger guard and back strap, iron mounted, cylinder with visible engraved naval engagement scene of the Republic of Texas Navy and the Mexican Navy, checkered hammer, replaced loading lever, standard front sight. Three ring binder containing complete history of Biscoe included with lot. Barrel length – 7 1/2". Overall length – 13 1/2". Serial number corresponds to year 1860. Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: There is a large binder of information on Capt. Thomas H Biscoe who was killed in action at the 1864 battle of the Wilderness accompanying this lot. CONDITION: The action is tight and crisp. Most of the cylinder scene is still visible with the exception of a few minor dings by the serial number. Replaced loading lever. [See more photos →]

$4,560.00
Lot 288: Confederate Selma, AL Arsenal Leather Cap Box Confederate Selma, AL Arsenal Leather Cap Box Lot 288: Confederate Selma, AL Arsenal Leather Cap Box

Confederate Selma, Alabama Arsenal Made Leather Cap Box. Brown leather, single stitched curved outer flap with lunate interior flap. Outer flap marked "SELMA ARSENAL". Includes brass finial, top portion of the closure tab, and wide belt loop. Also includes Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques retail listing. 4 1/2" H x 3 3/4" W x 1 5/8" D. Provenance: Purchased from Shannon Pritchard, Old South Military Antiques. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: For a similar example, see "Collecting the Confederacy" by Shannon Pritchard, 2005, page 76. CONDITION: The box is very well made with some crackling. The bottom portion of the closure tab is gone. [See more photos →]

$4,320.00
Lot 82: Harpers Ferry Model 1855 w/ Maynard primer Harpers Ferry Model 1855 w/ Maynard primer Lot 82: Harpers Ferry Model 1855 w/ Maynard primer

Harpers Ferry Model 1855 Percussion rifle – musket manufactured at the Harpers Ferry, Virginia armory in 1860. The lock has the Maynard tape primer and the magazine door is stamped with an eagle and shield motif. The barrel has a long range rear sight with a folding leaf. The iron block front sight front sight also serves as a stud for a socket bayonet. Walnut stock with iron patch box and numbers in yellow paint on stock in front of patch box “P9″(?sp). The rifle – musket retains the tulip head ramrod and has three barrel bands. The original clean out screw is also retained with the original leather strap. Lock plate is dated 1860 and “U.S. Harpers Ferry” in front of primer magazine. The top barrel flat is dated 1859. The left barrel flat is stamped with “VP” and an eagle head design inspection mark. “US”stamped on the heel of the buttplate in front of the buttplate screw. The left stock flat is stamped with an inspection mark and the barrel bands are stamped with a “U” facing the muzzle. Early crude initials “A B” carved into stock in front of buttplate. Overall length 55 7/8″, 40″ barrel length. Note – this rifle – musket descended through the family of Captain William Geary, 109th and 111th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Condition: Stock, barrel and mounts, and leather strap all retain the original surface. Light oxidation to “National Armory Bright” surface. [See more photos →]

$4,212.00
Lot 303: Nimschke Factory Engraved Colt Model 1849 Revolver, .32 cal Nimschke Factory Engraved Colt Model 1849 Revolver, .32 cal Lot 303: Nimschke Factory Engraved Colt Model 1849 Revolver, .32 cal

Nimschke Factory Engraved Colt Model 1849 Pocket Percussion Revolver, .32 caliber, serial number 80217, all visible serial numbers matching with dots to trigger guard and underside of frame. Top of barrel marked "Saml Colt", left side of frame marked "Colts Patent", cylinder and underside of frame marked "2" with serial number. Engraved scrollwork is present on most of the major components, entwining line and dot motifs appear on the loading lever and butt with a naval battle scene on the cylinder. Louis D. Nimschke's characteristic wolf head on either side of the hammer, left side of frame, and an eagle head on the right side of frame above the wedge. 1-piece ivory stocks, octagonal barrel, silver plated frame, standard front sight, loading lever. Barrel length – 5". Overall length – 10". Serial number corresponds to year 1853. Provenance: the collection of Benjamin Dysart, Brentwood, Tennessee. CONDITION: Action is excellent. Nimschke engravings highly visible, cylinder scene is weak. Gun has been cleaned in the past. Part of a cased set at one time. [See more photos →]

$4,096.00
Lot 301: New Orleans and Vicksburg Agent Marked Tranter items, incl. Revolver, Holster New Orleans and Vicksburg Agent Marked Tranter items, incl. Revolver, Holster Lot 301: New Orleans and Vicksburg Agent Marked Tranter items, incl. Revolver, Holster

Two (2) Civil War era Agent Marked Tranter items, including New Orleans Tranter Agent Marked Revolver, Vicksburg Tranter Marked Holster. 1st item: New Orleans Agent Marked Tranter Double Action Revolver, .36 caliber, serial number 11473.T. Top of barrel and breech marked "Manufactured Expressly for D. Kernaghan & Co. New Orleans W. Tranters Patent", left side of side-mounted loading lever and double trigger marked "W. Tranter Patent", right side of frame marked with serial number, cylinder marked with proper British proof marks. Checkered English walnut stocks, octagonal barrel, iron mounted with foliate engravings, side-mounted loading lever, standard front sight. Includes three ring binder containing purchasing information and research. Barrel length – 5 1/2". Overall length – 10 1/2". Serial number corresponds to approximately 1860. 2nd item: Confederate Agent Marked Louis Hoffman Vicksburg, Mississippi Leather Belt or Strap Holster for a Tranter Revolver. Brown leather, single stitched with metal clip (possibly German silver) marked "LOUIS HOFFMAN" in an arch over "VICKSBURG" in a straight line, reverse. Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. CONDITION: 1st item: Double action works well. Stocks with light dings. No finish on metal. 2nd item: The holster is very well made, all stitching is strong. Some flaking to leather. Areas of green corrosion to clip. [See more photos →]

$4,080.00
Lot 510: 129 Mounted Native American Points & Artifacts 129 Mounted Native American Points & Artifacts Lot 510: 129 Mounted Native American Points & Artifacts

Large mounted collection of Native American points and other related Indian tools/artifacts, 129 total, catalogued and numbered by the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture, Knoxville Tennessee. One item of note is a Clovis point, #52, from the Paleoindian period. A complete inventory of all items with dates is provided within the photos. 18 1/8″ H x 35 1/8″ W. Provenance: Collection was assembled by George Perrin, the consignor’s great-great grandfather on his farm located North of Dayton, Ohio. CONDITION: All items in as-found condition. Each item mounted on a board backing and secured by wire. Two holes to board are a result of prior mounting. [See more photos →]

$3,968.00
Lot 302: Cased Confederate Colt Model 1849 Pocket Percussion Revolver, .31 cal Cased Confederate Colt Model 1849 Pocket Percussion Revolver, .31 cal Lot 302: Cased Confederate Colt Model 1849 Pocket Percussion Revolver, .31 cal

Cased Confederate Colt Model 1849 Pocket Percussion Revolver, .31 caliber, serial number 106166, all visible serial numbers matching. Top of barrel marked "Address Saml Colt New York City", cylinder marked "Colt's Patent No. 106166". Walnut stocks, octagonal barrel, silver washed brass trigger guard and back strap, iron mounted with engraved stage coach hold up scene on cylinder, checkered hammer, standard sights, loading lever. Includes poplar case identified to Major Claudius L. Goodwin, Hampton's Legion, South Carolina in script reading "C L Goodwin", "Co…A", and possibly "Hampton Legion 186-". Case with blue velvet lining contains flask, nipple wrench, a "Eley London" tin of sand, and the key to the case. Three ring binder containing complete history of Goodwin included with lot. Barrel length – 4". Overall length – 9". Case – 2" H x 10" W x 5 3/4" D. Provenance: Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: Major Claudius L. Goodwin served in Hampton's Legion in major battles; Peninsula Campaign, Seven day Battle, 1st & 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Gettysburg, Tennessee Campaign, The Wilderness, Petersburg, Bentonville, Appomattox. CONDITION: The revolver is tight. Silver wash remaining on trigger guard and back strap. Finish remaining on stocks. Engraved cylinder scene is visible with some rust. [See more photos →]

$3,840.00
Lot 327: Confederate NC Clip Point Bowie Knife, Calvin Baker, 3rd VA Infantry Confederate NC Clip Point Bowie Knife, Calvin Baker, 3rd VA Infantry Lot 327: Confederate NC Clip Point Bowie Knife, Calvin Baker, 3rd VA Infantry

Confederate North Carolina Clip Point Bowie Knife. Belonged to Calvin Baker who served under Captain Hankins' Surry Light Artillery, 3rd Virginia Infantry. Turned walnut grip, brass ferrule with four decorative inscribed lines, blade with flat back and clip point. Unmarked. Includes binder with genealogical and military records of Calvin Baker and his family with additional photocopies of photographs of the knife. Blade length – 16 7/8". Overall length – 22". Provenance: Descended in the family of Calvin Baker until it was sold by his great grandson, Emmett Billings Baker, August 10, 2002. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: This knife is included in "Confederate Bowie Knives" by Jack Melton, Josh Phillips, and John Sexton, 2012, page 163. CONDITION: Overall good condition with dark patina, light pitting, and nicks to blade. Few areas of tarnish to ferrule. [See more photos →]

$3,712.00
Lot 270: Confederate Enlisted Louisiana Belt Buckle Confederate Enlisted Louisiana Belt Buckle Lot 270: Confederate Enlisted Louisiana Belt Buckle

Rare Confederate Enlisted Louisiana stamped rectangular belt buckle with three (3) brazed hooks. Depicts the state seal of Louisiana, a pelican feeding her young above "N.O". Includes a letter of authentication from Nick Periut of Army of Tennessee Relics, Knoxville, TN. 60 mm x 88 mm (2.36" x 3.46"). Provenance: Verbal history states that the buckle was dug in Melrose, Virginia near the location of the Battle of Harrisonburg, fought June 6, 1862. Estate of Jim Maconkey, Landrum, SC. Note: See "Confederate Belt Buckles and Plates" by Steve E. Mullinax, 1999, plate 290. CONDITION: Dug condition. [See more photos →]

$3,600.00