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Documents, Books, and Maps Highlights

Below are examples of exceptional results for Documents, Books, and Maps auctioned by Case Antiques, Inc. The sold price includes the Buyer’s Premium. If you have items like these in an estate, a private collection, or a museum, and would like to sell them, visit our selling page to learn more about consigning. We appreciate your interest!

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Lot 265: George Washington Signed Book w/ Bookplate George Washington Signed Book w/ Bookplate Lot 265: George Washington Signed Book w/ Bookplate

GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-1799). Washington was Founding Father, Commander-in-Chief of colonial forces during the American Revolutionary War and the first President of the United States of America. A volume signed by George Washington on the top of the title page. The book a bound copy of the first five issues of Volume One of “The Massachusetts Magazine: or Monthly Museum of Knowledge and Rational Entertainment”, published by Isaiah Thomas and Ebenezer T. Andrews of Boston in 1789. The inside front cover has his armorial bookplate and this book was once in his Mount Vernon library. The front endpaper has an inscription reading “Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr./1911/ Presented by his grandmother M.A.MC. from the library of his great-great-grandfather Chief Justice John Marshall”. The Massachusetts Magazine, founded in 1789 and published until 1796 by the famous printer Isaiah Thomas, advertised on its title page that it contains “poetry, music, biography, history, physics, geography, morality, criticism, philosophy, mathematics, agriculture, architecture, chemistry, novels, tales, romances, translations, news, marriages, deaths, eteorological observations, etc. etc.”. It was founded at the same time as the nation to act as “a kind of thermometer, by which the genius, taste, literature, history, politics, arts, manners, amusements and improvements of the age and nation, may be ascertained”. This particular book is important for Washington since it covers the events of 1789 that included his inauguration as the country’s first President. For example, page 314 is entitled “Papers relative to the President of the United States” and includes a printing of his Inaugural Address that starts with “Among the vicissitudes incident to life, no event could have filled me with greater anxieties than that of which the notification was transmitted by your order…”. It is then followed by “The Address of the Senate to the President of the United States In Answer to his Speech to Both Houses of Congress”. On page 286 is a passage entitled “Memoirs of General Washington”. In other words, Washington kept this book since it was a “clippings file” of his first year as President. An outstanding Washington signed book with a great association year and terrific content. Front endpaper with inscription reading: Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr./1911/ Presented by his grandmother M.A.M.C. (Mary Ambler Marshall Coleman) from the library of his great-great-grandfather Chief Justice John Marshall. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN, by descent from Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was also related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. Note: John Marshall was the fourth Chief Justice of the United States, serving for thirty-five years. He oversaw landmark decisions such as Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, Gibbons v. Ogden and the Dartmouth College case. His lifelong friendship with George Washington developed during their Revolutionary War service including the winter at Valley Forge and the battles at Brandywine and Monmouth; he went on to write one of the early biographies of America’s first president (see related lots, #263, 264). Description courtesy of Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc. CONDITION: This volume has been rebacked and rebound in leather with new endpapers before 1911 and is in good condition. It appears that the original front cover has been incorporated into the binding and shows some wear. The bookplate has been preserved and is in good condition. The front cover is scuffed. There is a slight tear to the title page nowhere near the dark Washington autograph, and there is toning and spotting to the interior pages. [See more photos →]

$138,000.00
Lot 484: Set of 10 Audubon books, Octavo Birds & Quadrupeds Set of 10 Audubon books, Octavo Birds & Quadrupeds Lot 484: Set of 10 Audubon books, Octavo Birds & Quadrupeds

Exceptional complete set of Audubon Octavo Birds and Quadrupeds (total 10 volumes). Includes the 7 volume – The Birds of America, from Drawings made in the United States and their Territories. New York: V. G. Audubon, Roe Lockwood & Son, 1860. The set also includes the 3 volume – The Quadrupeds of North America. New York: V. G. Audubon, 1856. This complete 10 volume set contains a total of 655 hand colored lithographed plates – 500 plates for the Birds of America volumes, 155 plates for the Quadrupeds of North America. Bird plate size 10 3/8? x 6 5/8?. Quadruped plate size 10 1/2? x 6 5/8?. Each volume with the inscription, “From Library of Hardy Bryan Aug 1860? and the later inscription, “To Hardy Bryan Branner from His Mother Magnolia Bryan Branner May 2nd 1897 with love”. Hardy Bryan Branner was mayor of Knoxville in 1880, a graduate under Robert E. Lee at Washington College, and co-founder of Standard Knitting Mills. He is buried in Old Gray Cemetery, Knoxville. Magnolia Avenue in Knoxville was named after his mother. Condition: Plates with vibrant colors and generally clean with no creases or tears. All 655 plates present. Very occasional minor foxing or spotting, a few plates just slightly discolored at margins, a few plates with slight toning. Some tissue guards with [See more photos →]

$34,800.00
Lot 590: Colonial GA related print: Tomo Chachi Mico and his Nephew Colonial GA related print: Tomo Chachi Mico and his Nephew Lot 590: Colonial GA related print: Tomo Chachi Mico and his Nephew

Important early Georgia related print depicting Tomochachi Mico or King of Yamacraw, and Tooanahowi his Nephew, Son to the Mico of the Etchitas. Circa 1734-1745 mezzotint engraving by John Faber the Younger (British, 1684-1756) after the painting by William Verelst (British, 1704-1752). Matted and housed under glass in a stained and ebonized wood frame. Sight approximately 14″ H x 9 7/8″ W. Sheet – 14 1/8″ H x 10″ W. Framed – 22 1/2″H x 17 7/8″W. Background information: (from The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts): “When James Oglethorpe (1696-1785) landed in Georgia in 1733 he worked to quickly cement a friendship with the Creek Indians. Oglethorpe established a particularly close relationship with Tomo Chachi Mico, King of the Yamacraw, part of the Creek nation. Tomochachi Mico and his nephew Tooanahowi accompanied Oglethorpe back to London in 1734. In London Tomo Chachi Mico and his nephew met the Trustees of the Georgia colony. That meeting is recorded in group portrait by the artist William Verelst now in the collection of the Winterthur Museum (acc. 1956.0567a). The pair also sat for a portrait, now lost, by Verelst. The two Georgia natives were a sensation in London, and soon after the portrait was completed it was engraved by John Faber. Though we know the men dressed in both English and native clothing while in London, they are depicted here in native clothing against an tropical background. Tomo Chachi Mico wears a deerskin cape over his shoulder, perhaps a symbol of the valuable deerskin trade with the English that the Creeks were engaged in. Tooanahowi holds an American bald eagle, a native symbol of peace and an example of the fauna of the new world.” Provenance: the estate of Victor T. Patterson, Franklin, TN. Note: born in Georgia and educated at the Parsons School of Design, Victor Patterson served as a cultural representative to Russia with Dwight D. Eisenhower’s “People to People” program (prior to its privatization) before moving to the Nashville, Tennessee area to pursue a career in interior design. He was associated with Bradford’s for many years before starting his own business. He decorated the Tennessee Governor’s Mansion and the home of several country music stars in the 1970s, and filled his home on Franklin’s historic Fourth Avenue with art and antiques from his frequent travels. CONDITION: Margins trimmed to plate. Print appears to be adhered to backing around perimeter. Light toning and foxing. Several creases resulting in white lines including across top, partial crease (vertical) upper right corner, diagonal across center touching Tomochachi’s chest and Nephew’s shoulder. 3-4 edge tears up to 1″. Couple small losses to edge, largest 1/2″L, barely extending into image. A few scattered pinpoint sized surface losses including two on Tomo Chachi’s face. Mat with grime and small losses, frame with abrasions and small losses. [See more photos →]

$22,800.00
Lot 436: 1807 Byron book, Cosway binding, Sangorski & Sutcliffe 1807 Byron book, Cosway binding, Sangorski & Sutcliffe Lot 436: 1807 Byron book, Cosway binding, Sangorski & Sutcliffe

“Hours of Idleness” by Lord Byron (George Gordon Noel Byron), 1807, first edition second issue, with early 20th century jewelled Cosway-style binding by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, the interior containing miniature portraits of Lord Byron and his ancestral home, Newstead Abbey. Original silk and velvet lined leather bound case. Hours of Idleness was the first volume of poetry published by Byron at the age of 19, which launched his literary career. This book contains properties associated with the second issue (Page 114 line 4 “thunder”; Page 22, line 2 “those tissues of falsehood..”). 8vo., 187 pp., printed by S. & J. Ridge, Newark, England. The binding, likely made not long after the foundation of the famed Sangorski (Sangorsky) and Sutcliffe bookbinding business in 1901, is of full dark blue French Levant morocco, with fly leaves of brown watered silk and gilt edges. The front cover features applied jewels including 1 central marquis garnet, 8 green chalcedonies, 14 turquoises, and 16 round garnets. The design on both front and back features interlaced strapwork, dividing the cover into Gothic style panels filled with red, green and gilt floral decorations. The front doublure is inlaid with a hand painted miniature watercolor on ivory portrait of Byron, surrounded by a laurel wreath inset with 4 green chalcedonies and 4 topazes. The back doublure is inlaid with a miniature watercolor on ivory painting of Newstead Abbey. Book: 8-1/2″ x 5-1/2″. Provenance: Estate of Robert Keith, Brentwood, TN, listed Dawson’s Book Shop catalog in 1944, full provenance details available on request. Condition: Binding excellent. Book pages show light toning and minor foxing, overall very good condition. Case in fair condition with exterior wear and some small tears to silk. [See more photos →]

$22,230.00
Lot 263: John Marshall’s 2 Volume Book: Marshall’s Washington, Signed by Marshall John Marshall’s 2 Volume Book: Marshall’s Washington, Signed by Marshall Lot 263: John Marshall’s 2 Volume Book: Marshall’s Washington, Signed by Marshall

Signed hardcover two volume set of John Marshall’s “The Life of George Washington”, published by Carey & Lea, Philadelphia, 1832. Second edition, “Revised & Corrected by the Author”. Stereotyped by J. Chrissy & G. Goodman. Volume I – 460 pages and 42 pages of notes. Volume II – 448 pages and 32 pages of notes. 8vo, calf leather cover, black leather spine labels, marbled endpapers and endpages. Engraved frontispiece portrait of Washington in Volume I. Errata Sheet with hand written notes included in Volume II. The first volume is inscribed “For Mr. James K. Marshall From his affectionate Father The Author”. The second volume is signed “J Marshall” on the title page. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN, by descent from Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was also related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. John Marshall was the fourth Chief Justice of the United States, serving for thirty-five years. He oversaw landmark decisions such as Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, Gibbons v. Ogden and the Dartmouth College case. His lifelong friendship with George Washington developed during their Revolutionary War service including the winter at Valley Forge and the battles at Brandywine and Monmouth. (See related lot #264). Description courtesy of Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc. CONDITION: Original cover with wear to the front boards and some wear to the spines. There is scattered foxing throughout but a fine association copy. Volume 1 with minor loss to lower back endpaper. Inscriptions and signatures clean and crisp. [See more photos →]

$21,600.00
Lot 264: George Washington Signed Letter to John Marshall George Washington Signed Letter to John Marshall Lot 264: George Washington Signed Letter to John Marshall

George Washington handwritten letter to John Marshall (ALS), congratulating him on his first election to a Federal Office: “With Infinite Pleasure I Received The News Of Your Election…a Few Days Now, Will Give Us The Result Of All The Elections To Congress & The Legislature Of The State”. GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-1799). Washington was the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, President of the Constitutional Convention, signer of the Constitution and First President of the United States. JOHN MARSHALL (1755-1835). Marshall was the fourth Chief Justice, serving for thirty-five years. He oversaw landmark decisions such as Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, Gibbons v. Ogden and the Dartmouth College case. ALS. 1pg. May 5th, 1799. Mount Vernon. An autograph letter signed “Go:Washington” and accompanied by a free franked address panel also signed “Go:Washington”. The former President wrote to John Marshall, congratulating Marshall on his election to the United States House of Representatives from the Richmond area. Washington hand wrote to the future Chief Justice (missing words are put in brackets): “With infinite pleasure I received the news of your Election. For the Honor of the District, I wish the Majority had been greater, but let us be content, and hope, as the tide is [turning, the current] will soon run strong on our favor. [I am] sorry to find that the publication [you allude to] should have given you a moments [disquiet] I can assure you, it made no im[pression on my] mind, of the tendency apprehend[ed by you]. [The] doubt you have expressed of Mr. [Hancock’s ele]ction, is unexpected as it is pain[ful in these] parts, we had set it down as cer[tain, and our] calculations went to eleven instead of nine. A few days now, will give us the result of all the Elections to Congress & the Legislature of the State; and as you are at the fountain of information respecting the politics of the members, give me, I pray you, the amount of the parties on each side, if you have the leisure & can ascertain them. With very sincere esteem & regards I am–Dear Sir–Yr Obedt & Affect Servt Go:Washington”. The address panel is in WashingtonÂ’s handwriting, and he sent it to “General Marshall in Richmond Go:Washington”; there is additional writing probably by a local postmaster. Includes dedication card reading “Presented to Louis Minor Coleman by his Aunt- Alice Marshall Coleman”, affixed to lower right corner of letter. Letter is mounted to grey card stock board. Letter – 9 3/4″ H x 16 1/4″ W. Board – 10″ H x 16 1/4″ W. Typed letter from Herbert A. Johnson, Associate Editor of “The Papers of John Marshall”, to Charles B. Coleman, Esq., dated February 26, 1968, included in lot. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN, by descent from Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis M. Coleman and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. Note: This was not Marshall’s first political victory. In 1782, he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates, and remained there for seven years; he was again elected to the Virginia House from 1795 to 1796. In 1788, Marshall served as a delegate to the Virginia convention that ratified the new Federal constitution; Marshall was a staunch supporter of the new government. He declined Washington’s offer of Attorney General. During the Adams administration, he declined an appointment to the Supreme Court, but he represented the United States during the infamous XYZ Affair. His 1799 election to the House of Representatives was his first Federal victory; Marshall was helped because of his support from Patrick Henry. In 1800, President Adams named Marshall Secretary of State and the next year, Adams nominated him to become the fourth Chief Justice. The “Mr. Hancock” mentioned is most likely the Virginia Congressman George Hancock, who served in the House of Representatives from 1793 to 1797. The letter and attached address leaf are glued to a larger board and framed; paper loss affects about twenty words. The Library of Congress owns a letterbook copy of this letter and the missing words can be ascertained. According to The American Book Prices Current (a compendium of auction results), only three Washington to Marshall letters have sold in the past quarter century. A 1968 letter from Herbert Johnson, the Associate Editor of the Papers Of John Marshall, states “This is such an important letter that I know you value it highly. As you may know Washington was the most important influence that impelled Marshall to stand for election in the House of Representatives. This was his first domestic office with the national government and from it he moved to the State Department and then the Chief Justiceship…Washington’s request that Marshall provide him with the Virginia election returns–another indication of Marshall’s position in the Federalist party in Virginia…”. An additional letter included in this lot is dated June 1913 from United States senator/historian Albert J. Beveridge and reads, “Dear Mr. Coleman: Miss Lizzie Marshall of Leeds, VA informed me that you have some letters of Chief Justice Marshall – one of them from George Washington.” (Beveridge states he is gathering material to write the The Life of John Marshall and would like copies of the letters.). A great association between the first President and the great Chief Justice. Description courtesy of Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc. CONDITION: Overall good condition. Washington signature and writing in strong, clear condition. Areas of dampstaining, including faint 3/4″ x 1 1/2″ dampstaining over signature (does not affect overall quality). 3 3/8″ x 2 1/4″ area of text missing from left margin of letter (3 3/8″ x 6 1/2″ area missing in total extending from below address to left horizontal fold line). 1/2″ x 3/8″ area of lower right corner repaired (does not affect signature). [See more photos →]

$19,200.00
Lot 262: John Marshall Signed 4 Volume Book Set: Plutarch’s Lives John Marshall Signed 4 Volume Book Set: Plutarch’s Lives Lot 262: John Marshall Signed 4 Volume Book Set: Plutarch’s Lives

John Marshall signed, four (4) Volume Book Set: “Plutarch’s Lives, Translated from the Original Greek, with Notes, Critical and Historical; and a Life of Plutarch” by John and William Langhorne, Carefully corrected and printed from the last London Edition, 4 volumes. Published James Crissy, Philadelphia, 1825. 8vo, calf leather cover, and black leather spine labels. All volumes signed by original owner, Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1846) on the title page. Additionally, each volume bears the inscription: “Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr. /1911/from his grandmother Mary Ambler Marshall Coleman” on the inside front cover. Volumes I, II and IV bear the additional signature of James K. Marshall, son of John Marshall. All four volumes are signed “J Marshall” on the title page. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN, by descent from Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of CSA Lt. Col. Lewis M. Coleman and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was also related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. American politican John Marshall was the fourth Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, serving for thirty-five years. He oversaw landmark decisions such as Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, Gibbons v. Ogden and the Dartmouth College case. Marshall also was a friend and attorney to George Washington, and was one of the first President’s early biographers (see related lot, #263 in this auction). Description courtesy of Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc. CONDITION: Wear and losses to covers, especially to Volume IV. Interiors with scattered foxing, toning and some dampstaining to all volumes. Inscriptions and signatures clean and crisp. Volumes II & III with pencil doodles and marks to the back free papers. The calf is rubbed and scratched. A fine set. [See more photos →]

$18,600.00
Lot 439: 19th C. Bird’s Eye View, Univ. of Virginia and Charlottesville from Lewis Mountain 19th C. Bird’s Eye View, Univ. of Virginia and Charlottesville from Lewis Mountain Lot 439: 19th C. Bird’s Eye View, Univ. of Virginia and Charlottesville from Lewis Mountain

Mid-19th century birdseye view of the Charlottesville, Virginia, area, graphite on cardstock, titled on two separate caption strips in faint period hand-written pencil script: THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA / CHARLOTTESVILLE AND MONTICELLO IN THE BACKGROUND / TAKEN FROM LEWIS MOUNTAIN. The panoramic view shows the Lawn of the original grounds of the University of Virginia, including the Annex to the Rotunda (constructed 1851-54, destroyed by fire in 1895), and the Anatomical Theater (completed in 1828, partially destroyed by fire in 1886, restored with modifications in 1888). The town of Charlottesville and Monticello Mountain are visible in the background. Unsigned. The drawing shows numerous similarities, and is possibly related, to the lithograph of the same subject and title drawn by Edward Sachse (1804-1873) of Sachse & Co. and published by Casimir Bohn in 1856, although it lacks several details (including the horses seen in the upper right foreground of the print). Sachse & Co. was responsible for several mid-19th century views of American towns including: Richmond, VA (1851), Norfolk, VA (1851), and Alexandria, VA (1854). Other artists drawing views of Virginia during the period included James T. Palmatary, John Serz (who also did an engraving of the University of Virginia for Bohn), Edward Beyer and David Hunter Strother. Housed in an early, possibly original silver-gilt molded wood frame; framing materials include square nails. Sketch – 11″ H x 18″ W. Sight – 11 7/8″ H x 17 7/8″ W. Framed – 15 1/4″ H x 21″ W. Provenance: Nashville, Tennessee, estate, descended in an early Charlottesville, Virginia, family. CONDITION: The drawing itself is in overall good condition with some minor losses upper margin, primarily at corners, and edge toning. Significant toning and some dampstaining to paper below sketch, with significant fading to penciled writing on captions. Sketch and caption strips are not adhered to backing. Frame: shrinkage and scattered oxidation and wear to frame, losses to upper left corner, right center margin; retains much of original gilding. [See more photos →]

$18,560.00
Lot 220: 19th c. Watercolor View, Nashville from Ft. Negley 19th c. Watercolor View, Nashville from Ft. Negley Lot 220: 19th c. Watercolor View, Nashville from Ft. Negley

“Nashville Panorama,” an important and large circa 1880 watercolor view of the city of Nashville from Fort Negley (built during the Civil War by Union troops and freed slaves). Visible are many Nashville landmarks including the Tennessee State Capitol, the University of Nashville, Howard School, and the Cumberland River, along with churches, brick and log homes, various figures, horses and carriages. Unsigned, artist unknown. Titled NASHVILLE TENN. lower margin. 21″ x 36″ sight, 29″ x 42″ matted and framed. Published, “The Tennessee Historical Quarterly: Landscape and Genre Painting in Tennessee, 1810-1985″ by James C. Kelly, Tennessee Historical Society, 1985. Exhibited, The Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, Sept. 5-Nov. 20, 1985; Dixon Gallery, Memphis, Dec. 1-Jan. 15, 1986; Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, Feb. 6-March 31, 1986, and the Dulin Gallery of Art, Knoxville, April 10-May 11, 1986. Provenance: the estate of Sarah Hunter Hicks Green, formerly of Historic Devon Farm, Nashville, Tennessee. CONDITION: 15″ light water stain down center, a couple of 1/2” areas of discoloration in the sky, overall light toning and fading. Examination out of frame reveals margins present and watercolor is not mounted or glued down. Later frame. [See more photos →]

$17,110.00
Lot 438: John Vanderlyn 1804 Portrait, possibly Thomas Jefferson John Vanderlyn 1804 Portrait, possibly Thomas Jefferson Lot 438: John Vanderlyn 1804 Portrait, possibly Thomas Jefferson

John Vanderlyn (New York, 1775-1852) ink wash, conte crayon and graphite oval portrait, possibly Thomas Jefferson, signed in pencil, “J. Vanderlyn,” in margin lower left, and in pencil “at Paris 1804,” in lower right margin. Paris, France artist supply store label en verso (partially hidden by brown tape). Oval image – 8-1/2″ x 6-1/2″. Oval image with border – 9-11/16″ x 7-1/2″. Board – 10-3/4″ x 8-1/2″. Framed – 15″ x 12-3/4″ x 2″ D. Early 19th century two-inch wide giltwood and composition frame having concave outer edge, applied acanthus and palmette decoration, concave burnished band and bead course interior edge. Note: A similar image of Thomas Jefferson at about this age can be seen on a Staffordshire historical transferware pitcher sold at Northeast Auctions, August 21-22, 2010, lot 765. See the link to this pitcher at: http://northeastauctions.com/product/thomas-jefferson-and-american-eagle-english-creamware-black-transfer-printed-jug-probably-staffordshire-circa-1801-08/. Biography: Born and raised in New York, John Vanderlyn was known as a painter of portraits and landscapes. He studied art in Paris twice, in 1796-1800 and again in 1803-1804 (during the time Jefferson served as President) before traveling to Italy. He had training in Neo-Classicism as espoused by Jacques-Louis David and Jean-Auguste Ingres. It was a style of “strong line, especially in the molding of figures, somber coloration, and an adherence to antique and mythological subjects or poses.” (sources: Zellman 81; Askart). The practice of painting portraits of important figures of the day from other sources (often oil portraits or even engraved prints from oils) was common in the Federal era. In fact, Vanderlyn’s later oil portrait of Andrew Jackson would become the basis for a number of paintings and prints done “after” his work. The Jefferson Papers connect Jefferson and Vanderlyn with a notation of a purchase of a pair of prints by the President from Vanderlyn on 31 December, 1805, however, those are believed to have been landscapes. CONDITION: Portrait: in need of conservation. Scattered foxing and discoloration; insect damage along upper border area. 3/8″ tear upper left in background. 7/16″ L paper loss with hole on subject’s jacket below a 7/8″ L white abrasion. Overall surface grime. Frame: Two loose braces on back and one missing brace. Losses to gilding on all sides. Older one-inch molding loss lower right edge. [See more photos →]

$13,800.00
Lot 451: John J. Audubon Trumpeter Swan, Havell ed. John J. Audubon Trumpeter Swan, Havell ed. Lot 451: John J. Audubon Trumpeter Swan, Havell ed.

John J. Audubon Havell Edition aquatint etching, TRUMPETER SWAN (YOUNG) – CYGNUS BUCCINATOR, plate CCCLXXVI . Printed lower right margin: Engraved, Printed and Coloured by R. Havell 1837. (Published 1838). Titled center margin and printed lower left margin: Drawn from Nature by J.J. Audubon. F.R.S. F.L.S. Watermarked J. Whatman 1838. Intaglio and watercolor on paper. Image – 22-7/8î H x 34-3/4î W. Sheet – 26-5/8î H x 40î W. Sight – 24 1/2″ H x 37″ W. Framed – 40″ H x 52 1/2″ W. Provenance: The estate of John Donnelly, Nashville, Tennessee. Note: In about 1820, John James Audubon declared an ambitious intent to paint every bird in North America and to fund it by selling groups of printed plates of his paintings to subscribers. He insisted on the bookís large format — printed on the largest handmade sheets available at that time — in order to portray the birds in their actual size and natural habitat. The result was the ornithological masterpiece, THE BIRDS OF AMERICA, Havell Edition, published periodically 1826-1838. There were 435 different prints of 497 bird species and an estimated 180 complete sets were produced; today about 110 (some sources say 120) remain intact as bound book volumes owned by museums, institutions and private individuals. – source: The Audubon Price Guide by Ron Flynn. CONDITION: Conserved in 2014, refer to scan of conservator’s report. Note: While conservation did much to stabilize the print by removing the dangerous tape adhesive and acid burning and minimize tears, the loss of original color (particularly to the swanís head) and margin chipping remain condition issues on this print. The decision was made to not recolor the faded areas, in order to maintain the historical integrity of the piece. [See more photos →]

$13,440.00
Lot 276: Morden 1673 Virginia Map of English Plantations Morden 1673 Virginia Map of English Plantations Lot 276: Morden 1673 Virginia Map of English Plantations

Robert Morden (d. 1703) and William Berry (fl. 1669-1708) : A NEW MAP OF THE ENGLISH PLANTATIONS IN AMERICA BOTH CONTINENTS AND ISLANDS, “Shewing their true Situation and distance from England or one with another. By Robert Morden, at the Atlas, in Cornhill nere the Royal Exchange, and William Berry at the Globe between York House and the New Exchange in the Strand, London.” 1673, black and white line engraving with hand coloring on laid paper. Cartouche depicting Native American figures upper left; inset map upper right showing the true situation of the colonies in relation to Britain. 17″ x 20 3/4″ image; 17 1/2″ x 21 1/2″ sight, 28″ x 32″ frame. Ref. William C. Wooldridge, “Mapping Virginia,” fig. 74 p. 82-83; Wooldridge states that this rare map is “the first general map of the American colonies.” Private Middle Tennessee collection. CONDITION: 1″ x 1/4″ loss to upper right corner. Two 1/2″ x 1/4″ losses at center edge and upper left edge (filled in on backing paper). 1″ tear upper right edge. Dark staining to entire upper edge, extending along entire right edge of map, other scattered lighter stains and pale discolorations. Taped down along top. [See more photos →]

$13,200.00
Lot 423: 1864 Presidential Ballots, 730 Total 1864 Presidential Ballots, 730 Total Lot 423: 1864 Presidential Ballots, 730 Total

Group of 730 ballots from the 1864 Presidential election, from Ohio soldiers voting in the field. The majority are Abraham Lincoln – Andrew Johnson Presidential ballots depicting Lady Liberty wielding a sword with a variety of other ballot designs and counties represented. A small minority (73) are McClellan – Pendleton Presidential ballots. Of the 73 McClellan – Pendleton ballots, there are 26 having portrait vignettes of McClellan. Several paper spacers with writing of locations soldiers stationed in the South are also present along with a few examples of handwritten ballots. Additionally, some of the ballots have the names of the soldiers written on the back with a few having phrases written on them. Examples include “L. S. Holcomb Co. D 97th Ohio”, who wrote: “can’t see peace at any price”. According to the 1886 History of Morgan Co. Ohio by Charles Robertson, Leroy S. Holcomb served in the Mission Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and Franklin, TN. Holcomb was seriously wounded at the Battle of Franklin later that year, and discharged. He subsequently studied medicine and graduated from the Ohio Medical College. Another soldier-signed ballot “Jas. R. Earich Co. E. 78 OVI” is for Sergeant James R. Earich of the 78th Ohio Company E. The Ohio History site states , “Earich took up the hazardous task of carrying a flag and fortunately survived the Battle of Atlanta. He was awarded a medal for bravery for his conduct on July 22, 1864. When Earich was offered a promotion to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant, he declined because he did not wish to give up bearing the colors.” Another ballot with the pencil inscription “H. N. Arnold Co. J 94th Ohio Vol Inf” is for H. Newton Arnold, 1st Lieutenant for the 94th Regiment of Ohio. Additional Lincoln/Johnson ballots include two (2) larger ballots with red, white, and blue and crossed flags, drums, swords, stacked rifles and winged eagle design, 3 ballots with the Union flag only, 13 ballots with no design on yellow paper from Morgan Co., and 10 handwritten Lincoln – Johnson ballots. Lincoln was victorious in winning the state of Ohio in the 1864 Presidential election. Condition: Overall very good condition. The two ballots with red, white, and blue colors have more folds and tears at the margin than others. Almost all ballots have a small hole in the center as a result of the tallying process, minor folds and tears at the margins, some toning. [See more photos →]

$12,870.00
Lot 297: "View of the University of Virginia" Panoramic Map "View of the University of Virginia" Panoramic Map Lot 297: "View of the University of Virginia" Panoramic Map

VIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, CHARLOTTESVILLE AND MONTICELLO, TAKEN FROM LEWIS MOUNTAIN, drawn and lithographed by Edward Sachse (Maryland/Germany, 1804-1873) and Company and the Sun Iron Building, published by Casimir Bohn (District of Columbia, mid 19th century), Washington, D.C. ; Richmond, V.A., 1856. Panoramic map depicting the Lawn of the original grounds of the University of Virginia, including the Annex to the Rotunda (constructed 1851-54, destroyed by fire in 1895), and the Anatomical Theater (completed in 1828, partially destroyed by fire in 1886, restored with modifications in 1888). The town of Charlottesville and Monticello Mountain are visible in the background. (Ref. “Virginia: Mapping the Old Dominion State Through History” by Vincent Virga and Emilee Hines, p. 44). Housed in a wooden frame. Sight – 20″ H x 26 1/4″ W. Framed – 26″ H x 33 3/4″ W. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN, by descent from Lewis Minor Coleman, Jr., son of University of Virginia Professor and CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis M. Coleman (1827-1863) and Mary Ambler Marshall (daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of John Marshall (1755-1835)). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. was also related to the family of Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Gen. Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. Biography: “Coleman, Lewis Minor, born in Hanover County, Virginia, February 3, 1827; graduated with high honors at the University of Virginia, in 1846, and became principal of the Hanover Academy; in 1859, upon the resignation of Dr. Harrison from the chair of ancient languages in the University of Virginia, Mr. Coleman, who had been a pupil of Dr. Harrison, was elected professor of Latin, and relinquished his position in the Hanover Academy to accept the same; he served in that capacity but for two years, for in 1861, at the outbreak of the civil war, he joined the ranks of the Confederate army, in which he enlisted as captain of an artillery company which he recruited; he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel of artillery in 1862; at the battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, he was severely wounded, and after three months died from his injury, March 21, 1863”. (Source: “The Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography:, Volume III, by Lyon Gardiner Tyler, LL. D., 1915). CONDITION: Overall fair condition with toning, moderate dampstaining, and foxing spots. Areas of acid burn, largest 1/4″, top right quadrant of sheet. 3″ L. horizontal tear, center left edge of sheet. 3/4” L. loss to sheet and small dark stain at top, left of center. [See more photos →]

$11,264.00
Lot 209: Ferdinand Pettrich, Bust of Henry Clay Ferdinand Pettrich, Bust of Henry Clay Lot 209: Ferdinand Pettrich, Bust of Henry Clay

Bust of Kentucky statesman Henry Clay (1777-1852) by Ferdinand Pettrich (German/American, 1798-1872). Life-sized cast-iron bust, plate verso with the name of sculptor and date of 1842 (the year Clay retired from the U.S. Senate and returned home to Kentucky; in 1844, Clay was nominated as the Whig party Presidential candidate). 22″H x 15″W. Biography: German-born Ferdinand Pettrich trained in the studio of his father in Dresden, before traveling to Rome to study under the famous Danish sculptor Thorwaldsen. He came to America, where he spent considerable time in Washington D.C. from 1835-1843 seeking commissions for his work. Many of his subjects were American politicians of the day. Pettrich resided in Georgetown with his wife and three children and rented a studio in an abandoned church. In an 1838 letter of a patron of Pettrich, the sculptor appealed for help because of the illness of one of his children. The patron stated Pettrich had requested Henry Clay sit for a bust and Clay had responded with a favorable reply (p. 398 Ferdinand Pettrich in America by R. L. Stehle). Some of Pettrich’s notable sculpture commissions included “Washington Resigning His Commission” and “Dying Tecumseh”. He also executed busts of Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson. In May of 1842, two assassins entered Pettrich’s studio and stabbed him twice. Shortly thereafter, Pettrich and his family moved to Brazil and he became the court sculptor for Emperor Dom Pedro II, carving monumental sculptures of the monarch and his cabinet officials before returning to Europe. Note: A similar plaster bust is featured in the book “Franz and Ferdinand Pettrich: Two Saxon Sculptors from the Period of Classicism” by Hans Geller, Dresden: Wolfgang Jess, 1955, see page 128, image #66. Provenance – Lexington, Kentucky area collection. Condition: Overall oxidation and light pitting as the much of the original bronzed surface has been lost. CONDITION: Overall oxidation and light pitting as much of the original bronzed surface has been lost. [See more photos →]

$10,836.00
Lot 606: Abraham Lincoln signed 1861 Appointment, Green Clay of KY Abraham Lincoln signed 1861 Appointment, Green Clay of KY Lot 606: Abraham Lincoln signed 1861 Appointment, Green Clay of KY

Signed Abraham Lincoln Civil War era document appointing Green Clay of Kentucky (1839-1912) as Secretary of the Legation of the United States at St. Petersburg, Russia, July 15, 1861. Signed by President Abraham Lincoln and countersigned by Secretary of State William Seward. Embossed presidential seal lower left. 12" x 18" sight, framed under glass in later narrow black metal frame, 12 1/4" x 18 1/4". Col. Green Clay was a member of Bourbon, County Kentucky's prominent Clay family. He was the son of Brutus Junius Clay and grandson of General Green Clay. He attended Transylvania University in Lexington, KY, and Yale University. He was a recent graduate of Harvard Law School in 1861, when his fellow Kentucky native, President Abraham Lincoln, appointed him Secretary to the United States Minister to Russia. That post was held by Clay's uncle, the Honorable Cassius Marcellus Clay, a noted abolitionist. Green Clay worked only one year in Russia, helping his uncle secure Russian support for the Union cause before returning to the US to fight in the Civil War. He served as a Colonel in the Union Army, 3rd Kentucky Cavalry from 1862 to 1865. CONDITION: Lincoln autograph clear and bold, crossed by two fold lines. Some separations along fold lines, overall toning, scattered creasing. 1 3/4" tear lower left edge. [See more photos →]

$9,600.00
Lot 104: Andrew Jackson Portrait attrib. Leutze Andrew Jackson Portrait attrib. Leutze Lot 104: Andrew Jackson Portrait attrib. Leutze

Large oil on canvas historical portrait of President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), after the 1820 full-length portrait by John Vanderlyn. Attributed to historical genre painter Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze (District Of Columbia/New York/Germany, 1816-1868). This life sized painting depicts Jackson on the battlefield (likely at New Orleans), attired in his military dress uniform, holding his sword in one hand and hat in the other, with his horse and fellow soldiers in the background. Housed in a carved cove style gilt wood frame with applied corner elements. Sight – 94 3/4″ H x 64 1/2″ W. Framed – 106 1/2″ H x 76 1/2″ W. Provenance: private Tennessee collection, acquired at Freeman’s Auction, Philadelphia, Nov. 13, 2013 Lot 267; Private Pennsylvania collection, acquired at Freeman’s Auction, April 12, 2003, Lot 196; The Free Library of Philadelphia, where it hung for many years in Pepper Hall at the Central Branch; given to the Library March 2, 1931, by John Frederick Lewis, who acquired the portrait from the estate of Almira K. Schwenk. This painting came to the library with the tradition that it had been exhibited at the Centennial Exposition in 1876, although we have not been able to confirm this. CONDITION: Canvas laid down on masonite, rubbing to left perimeter edge of canvas, numerous old repairs. Blacklight reveals area of flourescence to several areas of background and to cheek, pant leg. [See more photos →]

$9,000.00
Lot 424: Early Andrew Jackson Signed Letter to Richard K. Call (ALS) Early Andrew Jackson Signed Letter to Richard K. Call (ALS) Lot 424: Early Andrew Jackson Signed Letter to Richard K. Call (ALS)

Early Andrew Jackson signed letter to Richard K. Call (ALS), protege and former military aide to Jackson during the War of 1812, later Governor of Florida Territory. Written from The Hermitage, Tennessee, dated January 4, 1821, prior to Jackson’s appointment as Military Governor of Florida and election as President, two and one half-page letter signed Andrew Jackson, lower right of second page, with postscript initialed A. J., middle right of third page. The letter refers primarily to Call’s romantic relationship with his future wife Mary Letitia Kirkman, Nashville, TN, despite the fact that her parents were enemies of Jackson and deeply opposed the union. The postscript refers to Jackson’s approval of John C. Calhoun’s, Secretary of War, proposal for what would become the Reduction Act, passed by Congress March 2, 1821, as well as his opinions on the Missouri Compromise controversy, stating “The house of Representatives has rejected Misouri [sic], the Senate has admitted it, [John Henry] Eaton, (United States Senator from Tennessee and friend of Jackson’s), has done himself musch credit by an amendment which is said produced the admission by the Senate Should the house reconsider its vote Misouri [sic] will I expect sequester the property of the U.S. and hold it for their own use, untill [sic] it is invited into the Union by Congress, this is the only course she can adopt as an independant [sic] State, unless she returns to her Teritorial [sic] government, this would be a course too humble for a free people to submit to…”. Includes typed transcription of letter. Also includes a stipple engraving of Andrew Jackson by Henry Bryan Hall after a portrait by Ralph Eleaser Whiteside Earl (American, c. 1785/88-1838). Letter, transcription, and engraving housed in an archival letter box with marbled paper boards, black leather half-binding with gilt title lettering and five raised hubs on spine. Letter – 9 7/8″ H x 8″ W. Transcription – 11″ H x 8 1/2″ W. Engraving – 8 5/8″ H x 5 3/4″ W. Archival Box – 11 3/4″ H x 9 1/2″ W x 1 1/8″ D. American. Provenance: Anne P. and Thomas A. Gray Library and MESDA Research Center. CONDITION: Letter in overall very good condition. Five brown stains, largest 3/4″, right vertical crease of letter. Few minute holes, surface of last page. Right and left vertical creases have been professionally repaired (very inconspicous). Areas of light overall toning surrounding image, surface of engraving. Toning visible en verso, engraving. [See more photos →]

$8,960.00
Lot 296: War of 1812 White House Artifact & Custom Box War of 1812 White House Artifact & Custom Box Lot 296: War of 1812 White House Artifact & Custom Box

Remnant of a burned White House timber removed from the White House during the 1950 renovations, from the 1814 White House fire started by the British during the War of 1812. Bears plaque to side reading “Original White House Material/ Removed in 1950″ with the Presidential Seal in the center. Housed in a custom made marquetry box comprised of walnut and oak from White House repairs and cedar from the White House grounds. Construction diagram pasted to the interior of the lid and signed by the maker F. C. Mayes. Wood artifact – 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2”. 2″ H x 6″ W x 3 3/4″ D. Note: From 1949 to 1952, the White House underwent a major renovation. President Harry Truman noticed when he moved in that the White House was quite dilapidated, and pressed Congress for funds to refurbish the mansion. In the House of Representatives, the White House renovation was overseen by the Public Works Committee, on which sat first-term Congressman Gerald Ford. Truman gave Ford and other committee members a personal tour of the White House, pointing out its defects. What Ford remembered most, however, “was when he took us into the Oval Office and I saw that little sign on his desk: ‘The Buck Stops Here’. I thought, Well, that’s a good description of a President’s job”. The three-year project included tearing down all but the exterior walls and rebuilding everything within. In the process, workers found charred lumber from the burning of the White House in 1814. Clearly these structurally unstable pieces could not remain. Instead, they were removed and sold to the public as souvenirs, as directed by the Commission on the Renovation of the Executive Mansion. In March of 1952, a small ceremony marked the end of the renovation and the opening of the refurbished and structurally-sound White House. Provenance: From the estate of Captain Gordon Wells, member of the Secret Service’s Uniformed Division, the White House Police, from 1943 through 1967. During his tenure, Wells received mementos from sitting Presidents and First ladies of 5 administrations, from Franklin Roosevelt through Lyndon B. Johnson. CONDITION: Both artifacts in very good condition. [See more photos →]

$8,960.00
Lot 260: 1871 Foster Map of Davidson County 1871 Foster Map of Davidson County Lot 260: 1871 Foster Map of Davidson County

Large, early and scarce map of Davidson County – NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, FROM ACTUAL SURVEYS MADE BY ORDER OF THE COUNTY COURT OF DAVIDSON COUNTY, 1871 surveyed and mapped by Wilbur F. Foster, Civil and Topographical Engineer; Engraved, printed and manufactured by G.W. and C. B. Colton of New York. Depicts different colored civil districts along with roads, railroads, streams, schools and businesses, post offices, and some residences with owner names. Pictorial view of the city of Nashville from the west including image of the State Capitol building, at lower margin. 54″ x 49″ sight, 55 1/4″ x 50 1/2″ in stained hardwood frame. Provenance: the estate of Sarah Hunter Hicks Green, formerly of Historic Devon Farm, Nashville, Tennessee. CONDITION: Multiple tape-repaired tears, scattered holes up to 2″ diameter, many creases, appears lacquered. [See more photos →]

$8,260.00
Lot 248: Presidential/Civil War Autograph Albums plus Henry Longfellow Letter Presidential/Civil War Autograph Albums plus Henry Longfellow Letter Lot 248: Presidential/Civil War Autograph Albums plus Henry Longfellow Letter

Two (2) autograph albums from the early Nineteenth Century to the Civil War, containing the signatures of Presidents and First Ladies, prominent Civil War figures, notable authors, and other important Americans. Approximately fifty-six (56) autographs are inscribed directly onto the pages, pasted to paper, or on loose paper, with a few images, drawn onto the paper and loose. Presidents and First Ladies: Two (2) JOHN ADAMS (1735-1826) clipped signatures pasted to page with Abigail Adams and Charles Francis Adams Sr. signatures (see below). Includes one (1) end of life signature with additional piece of paper with location and date reading “Quincy April 28th 1823” pasted below signature, located in blue album. One (1) ABIGAIL ADAMS (1744-1818), wife of John Adams, clipped signature pasted to page with John Adams and Charles Francis Adams Sr. signatures (see above), with additional piece of paper dated “1813” pasted below signature, located in blue album. Two (2) JOHN QUINCY ADAMS (1767-1848) clipped signatures. One (1) pasted to lower right corner of page with Louisa Catherine Adams autographed poem (see below), located in blue album. One (1) pasted to page with Samuel Adams and Charles Francis Adams Sr. signatures (see above), located in brown album. One (1) LOUISA CATHERINE ADAMS (1775-1852), wife of John Quincy Adams, one-page autographed poem written on the page, dated August 11, 1848 from Quincy, MA, reading “Yet let not hence, presumption dare to scan The scope and purposes of Almighty mind Or scrutinize with impious doubt the plan Of wisdom and of goodness still combinedÖ”. Includes a small engraved portrait of John Quincy Adams with his clipped signature pasted to the page (see above) with a notation in Louisaís hand indicating that the poem was written by John Quincy Adams, located in blue album. One (1) JAMES BUCHANAN (1791-1868) clipped signature pasted to page, dated April 25, 1845, located in blue album. One (1) JAMES MADISON (1751-1836) free franked panel pasted to page, dated February 19 [year unspecified], from Washington, D.C., addressed to Richard Cutts, his brother-in-law, located in blue album. One (1) DOROTHEA DANDRIDGE PAYNE TODD MADISON (1768-1849), also known as DOLLEY MADISON, wife of James Madison, one-page autographed quotation written on page, dated June 1, 1848 from Washington, D.C., reading “Temper, thy power more magical Than that which graced of old Amphion’s lyre, Can savage hearts with wondrous spell the mind enthrall Can clean suspicion’s mist with gladdening fire…”, located in blue album. One (1) JAMES K. POLK (1795-1849) clipped signature pasted to page, undated, located in blue album. Authors: One (1) WASHINGTON IRVING (1783-1859) signature written on page, dated May 19, 1852 with notation indicating that it was “written at Rockwood”, above clipping engraving of Rockwood pasted to page below, located in blue album. One (1) HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW (1807-1882) one-page autographed quotation written on separate paper, the top margin pasted to page, dated January 1856, containing the concluding stanza of his poem “The Day Is Done”, located in blue album. One (1) JOHN HOWARD PAYNE (1791-1852), author of “Home, Sweet Home”, clipped signature pasted to page, undated, located in blue album. One (1) LYDIA HUNTLEY SIGOURNEY (1791-1865), an American poetess commonly known as the “Sweet Singer of Hartford”, one-page, double-sided autographed letter written on separate paper, the left margin pasted to page, dated December 31, 1844 from Hartford, CT, sending New Yearís wishes, located in blue album. Civil War Generals/Leaders: One (1) WILLIAM TECUMSEH SHERMAN, a leading Union general, clipped signature from the bottom of a letter pasted to page, dated February 28, circa 1860’s from Hilton Head, SC, located in brown album. One (1) JOSHUA LAWRENCE CHAMBERLAIN (1828-1914), a Union general remember for his heroic actions at Little Round Top at Gettysburg, one-page bifolium letter, left margin pasted to page, dated October 25, 1906 from Portland, ME, in which he responds to Emily D. Boyd’s request for his autograph, located in blue album. One (1) JUBAL ANDERSON EARLY (1816-1894), a Confederate general, one-page autograph written on separate paper, the top margin pasted to page, dated October 31, 1847, from Toronto, ON, Canada, located in blue album. One (1) GEORGE MCCLELLAN, Union general, clipped signature from the bottom of a “Head Quarters, Army of the Potomac” letter pasted to page with George H. Thomas signature (see below), located in brown album. One (1) LEONIDAS POLK (1806-1864), a Confederate general killed in action near Atlanta in 1864, autographed quotation written on the page, dated July 4, 1855 from New Orleans, LA, reading “Now in thy youth he served him who givest…That his light in thy heart…”, located on blue album. Two (2) GEORGE H. THOMAS (1816-1870), a Union general nicknamed “The Rock of Chickamauga”. One (1) clipped signature pasted to page, undated, located in brown album. One (1) clipped signature from the bottom of a “Head Quarters, Army of the Potomac” letter pasted to page with McClellan signature (see above), located in brown album. One (1) JEFFERSON DAVIS (1808-1889), an American politician who served as the only President of the Confederate States, clipped signature pasted to the page, dated February 25, 1867, reading “very truly your friend Jefferson Davis”, located in blue album. Others Notable Figures: Two (2) HENRY DEARBORN (1751-1829), a Revolutionary War general, Congressman and Jefferson’s Secretary of War, and Commanding General of the United States Army during the War of 1812 clipped signatures. One (1) clipped signature pasted to page, undated, located in blue album. One (1) franked panel pasted to page, dated December 3 [year unspecified], from the War Department, Washington, D.C. Includes red wax seal, located in brown album. One (1) SAMUEL ADAMS, an American statesman, political philosopher, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States who signed the Declaration of Independence, elderly clipped signature pasted to page with John Quincy Adams and Charles Francis Adams Sr. signatures (see above), located in brown album. One (1) WINFIELD SCOTT (1786-1866), a United States Army general and the unsuccessful presidential candidate of the Whig Party in 1852, signature written on the page, located in brown album. One (1) GEORGE BANCROFT (1800-1891), an American historian and statesman, one-page autographed letter written on black bordered paper, left margin pasted to page, undated. One (1) BENJAMIN SILLIMAN, a prominent American scientist, one-page bifolium letter loose from album, dated March 14, 1845, New Orleans, LA, written to Miss Harrod as an introduction, located in blue album. Also includes clipped signatures of CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS SR. (1807-1886), LEWIS CASS (1782-1866), WILLIAM MARCY (1786-1857), JOHN PAULDING (1758-1818), CHARLES SUMNER (1811-1874), and others. Autographs housed in one (1) hardbound tooled navy-blue leather with gilt pictorial covers, containing approximately forty-three (43) autographs, with Boyd family crest ex libris label pasted to inside of front cover, gilt edged paper, and one (1) hardbound tooled light brown leather album with gilt pictorial front cover with gilt lettering to front cover and spine, containing approximately thirteen (13) autographs, inscribed “Annette M. Boyd from her Sister” in ink, front end paper, gilt edged paper (see above description for locations of specific autographs). 3rd item: HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW ALS. One double-sided, handwritten letter from Henry W. Longfellow, Cambridge, MA, to Mrs. Carroll, dated April 9, 1877. He writes to thank Mrs. Carroll for sending him photographs of the Wingate House. Housed under double-sided glass in a painted wooden frame with hook, top center. Sight – 6 3/4″ H x 4 3/8″ W. Framed – 7 3/4″ H x 5 3/8″ W. Provenance: The Estate of Charles Boyd Coleman, Jr., Chattanooga, TN. The books and letter descended in the family of Lewis M. Coleman Jr. II (1894-1914), son of Lewis M. Coleman Jr., son of CSA Lt. Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman (1827-1863) and Mary Ambler Marshall, daughter of James K. Marshall and granddaughter of United States Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1835). Lewis M. Coleman Jr. also was related to the family of Revolutionary War General Henry Dearborn by his marriage to Julia Wingate Boyd, daughter of Annette Maria Dearborn Boyd, who was the daughter of Greenleaf Dearborn (1786-1846) and great granddaughter of Henry Dearborn (1751-1829) on her mother’s side. CONDITION: Autograph albums: Signatures in overall good condition with some foxing spots, old paste stains, toning impressions, minute tears (do not affect signatures). Covers in worn condition, majority of spine is no longer present, blue album. First leaf of pages separated from binding, blue album. Many of the pages are almost separated from binding, including page with John Adams and John Quincy Adams cut signatures, brown album. Several of the pages are blank, both albums. 3rd item: Overall good condition with foxing spots. [See more photos →]

$7,800.00
Lot 688: Oriental Field Sports of the East, T. Williamson, 1819 Oriental Field Sports of the East, T. Williamson, 1819 Lot 688: Oriental Field Sports of the East, T. Williamson, 1819

Oriental Field Sports of the East; Being a Complete, Detailed, and Accurate Description of the Wild Sports of the East, Second Edition, taken from the manuscripts and designs by Captain Thomas Williamson, drawings by Samuel Howitt, 1819. Printed by B. R. Howlett for Thomas McClean, London. Oblong folio, 145 marble edged pages with index, 40 hand colored aquatint plates after Samuel Howitt (from sketches by Williamson) by H. Merke, J. Hamble, and Vivares, hand painted half title page, rebound in three-quarter black pebbled leather with green pebbled leather sides, gilt lettering to spine, five raised hubs, marbled end papers. Illegible 1892 Calcutta inscription to interior. 17 1/4" H x 22 5/8" W x 1 3/4" D. Early 19th century. Provenance: a Middle Tennessee estate, by descent from Thomas G.B. Wheelock. Note: Thomas G.B. Wheelock was known as an astute collector of African Art and co-author of the book "Land of the Flying Masks: Art & Culture in Burkina Faso" He also inherited a sizeable collection of Asian, British, and military related antiques from his grandparents, Gilded Age tycoon George Briggs Buchanan of New York, and William and Margaret Wheelock, who owned a Scottish manor home known as Bunker Hill. (Margaret Carmichael Wheelock was also a founding partner of the fashion firm Farquharson & Wheelock in New York). See other related lots in this auction, including lot 66, a tray with Bengal Staff Corps inscription. CONDITION: Covers in worn condition with loss to leather, cracks, largest 3 1/2" to spine, corners bumped. Pages with toning/toning impression, acid burn, foxing spots, creases, tears, pencil inscriptions, etc. to be expected from age. Plates are collated. Plate I laid down onto page. [See more photos →]

$7,680.00
Lot 72: Portrait of CSA Gen. Daniel Smith Donelson by George Dury Portrait of CSA Gen. Daniel Smith Donelson by George Dury Lot 72: Portrait of CSA Gen. Daniel Smith Donelson by George Dury

Portrait of Daniel Smith Donelson (1801-1863), oil on canvas in original giltwood frame, signed lower right and on back G. Dury (George Dury, Germany/Tennessee, 1817-1894). Daniel Smith Donelson, nephew of President Andrew Jackson, wasone of three sons born to Samuel and Mary Donelson of Sumner County, Tennessee (one of his brothers was Andrew Jackson Donelson). A graduate of West Point (1825), he had a distinguished military career before serving in the Tennessee House ofRepresentatives from 1841 until 1843 and again from 1855 until 1861. He was speaker of the house when the Civil War started. When Tennessee seceded, he returned to the military as adjutant general of the Provisional Army of Tennessee. Toprotect the Cumberland River he selected the sites for Forts Henry and Fort Donelson; the latter was named in his honor. Donelson fought in several battles, including the Battle of Murfreesboro, where he was part of the charge that broke theright wing of the Federal army. In January 1863, Donelson was given command of the Department of East Tennessee. He remained in command of the department until his death on April 17 1863 near Knoxville at Montvale Springs, TN. Five days [See more photos →]

$7,590.00
Lot 382: Portrait of a Spanish Colonial Officer Portrait of a Spanish Colonial Officer Lot 382: Portrait of a Spanish Colonial Officer

Late 17th/early 18th century oil on canvas portrait of a Spanish Colonial officer, possibly a member of the viceroyalty, standing In his military dress uniform with sash belt and sword, medal with ribbon around his neck. Subject holds a letter in one hand reading: “Prospecto para mejorar de sueldos a los Individuos de la real casa de Moneda de Santafe” – prospect to improve the salaries of the individuals of the royal mint of Santafe (Bogata, Columbia) and a cane in the other. Coat of Arms upper left corner reading “Armas de los Henriquez de Guzman”. Unsigned. Housed in a later gilt carved Baroque style frame with corner and side ornaments; Wunderly Bros., Pittsburgh framing label en verso. Sight – 34″ H x 26 3/4″ W. Framed – 45 1/2″ H x 38″ W. Provenance: a Nashville, Tennessee estate. CONDITION: Relined, with overall fine cracquelure. Area of paint loss to lowermost edge of canvas near frame edge near top of subject’s right leg. Triangular shaped area of inpainting/overpainting visible under UV light between crest and subject’s head. Scattered light grime and tiny accretions. A few scattered losses to gilding on frame. [See more photos →]

$7,200.00
Lot 161: Gould’s Synopsis of The Birds of Australia Gould’s Synopsis of The Birds of Australia Lot 161: Gould’s Synopsis of The Birds of Australia

A Synopsis of The Birds of Australia and the Adjacent Islands by John Gould, F.L.S., published by the author, 20 Broad Street, Golden Square, London, 1837-38. 73 hand-colored lithographic plates by and after Elizabeth Gould, 8 pp. Description of New Species at end. Owner’s bookplate on end paper: George Ernest Morrison. Paper label on end paper: Angus and Robertson, Booksellers to the University, 89 Castlereagh Street, Sydney. Sheets: 10-5/8″ x 7-1/8″, Volume: super octavo. Dark green half-leather, gilt-ruled, decorative stamped binding, all edges gilt. Provenance: George Ernest Morrison (1862-1920) was a journalist, traveller and political adviser to the Chinese government. He sold his library of Western language works on China, over 20,000 volumes, maps and pamphlets in 1917 to Baron Iwasaki, then president of Japan’s Mitsubishi Corp. The collection is now held by the Tokyo Toyo Bunka Kenkyusho. (See Australian Dictionary of Biography, Australian National University). Condition: Minor scattered foxing except for plate of “Graucalus Tenuirostris”, “Graucalus Swainsonii”, “Graucalus Mentalis”. Joints and corners rubbed. [See more photos →]

$7,192.00
Lot 243: Hicks Family Archive, TN Hicks Family Archive, TN Lot 243: Hicks Family Archive, TN

An extensive archive of material related to the family of Edward Dickson Hicks II, Edward Dickson Hicks III and Edward Dickson Hicks IV of Devon Farm, Nashville, Tennessee. The archive covers the men and their families over a time period from roughly 1850-1960, with the majority of ephemera dating from 1865, when Edward Dickson Hicks II (1831-1894) inherited the property from his aunt Fanny Harding and began raising Devon Farm cattle. The archive includes several hundred letters, many in original envelopes with postage stamps; dozens of postcards; several hundred receipts for furnishings, farm purposes, and services such as tuition of children from tutors and the Shelby Female Insititute (many on decorative letterhead of late 19th-early 20th century Nashville establishments); approximately 1 dozen land documents including deeds/indentures; broadside for the sale of Ed Hicks property Grassland, 12 miles southwest of Nashville; 50 to 100 photographs of family members, many identified verso, including an 8″ x 10″ print of Hunter Giers Hicks greeting First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt outside a train (the two ladies were said to have been friends), a photograph of Hunter Giers Hicks as a baby with her nurse Minnie, taken by her father, noted Nashville photographer Otto Giers, and scenes of cattle and farm life. 7 small notebooks/journals are present, including Ed Hicks account of his visit to the World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exhibition in New Orleans in 1885 and his expenditures; 1858 savings deposit book; 1866 diary with mostly farm related entries; a circa 1868 account book; an 1849 school notebook; “Mrs. Hicks'” (probably Mary Ann White Hicks or Harriet Cockrill Hicks) 1903-1905 journal with entries, mostly personal, but including an eclipse in Africa “visible in America at daylight,”, seeing a ferris wheel, yellow fever epidemic in New Orleans, creating “anxiety throughout the South”; peace between Russia and Japan – “Roosevelt is a peace maker;” and a 1907-1909 diary likely also from Mrs. Hicks, opens with “Today President Roosevelt arrived at nine o’clock and one grand __ was given him. He spoke at the Auditorium and then went to the Hermitage to visit the tomb of Andrew Jackson.” Includes some newspaper clippings, poems and other notes in the back. Other notable items in the archive include: Holy Bible, printed London 1853 by Eyre & Spottiswoode (no family info); ephemera related to Ed Hicks II’s role as administrator for the estate of John Davis c. 1853-1854; a 1856 “Phrenological Character” report on E.D. Hicks given at Fowler and Wells Phrenological Cabinet in New York (“You have a comparatively tough and enduring constitution, but have the appearance of having lived in a bad climate or having engaged in some occupation that was too confining for health, and have thus apparently run down…” ); 1857 letter commissioning Edward Hicks as delegate to the Southern Commercial Convention in Knoxville on orders of Gov. Andrew Anderson; Appointment signed by Governor Alvin Hawkins appointing Ed Hicks Fish Commissioner for Middle Tennessee, 1862; survey map of land along the Harpeth, possibly Devon Farm; plot of a field belonging to Jas. Greer, “Surveyed by Ed Hicks May 20, 1872 His first survey for which he received $1.30”; Broadside/advertisement for the Hurricane Mills Woolen Mills in Waverly, TN dated 1868; ephemera related to Hicks’ role in the Nashville Commercial Insurance Co including an 1868 telegram: “Our store was burned last night send an agent immediately,” signed J.M. White & Co. of Dresden, TN; an 1875 booklet titled Nashville Fire Alarm Telegraph Signal Stations; Emma Hicks’ autograph book with tipped in Victorian lithographed illustrations, circa 1892, containing approximately 50 autographs of young ladies; an 1891 secretarial signed letter from Gov. John P. Buchanan to Ed Hicks expressing regret at not being able to attend a meeting of the University of Nashville board of trustees; letter from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture commissioning Ed Hicks to collect samples of grain for the World’s Columbian Exhibition in 1893; a softcover book, “Information for Immigrants concerning Middle Tennessee and counties in that Division traversed by The Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railway, published 1896 in Nashville and picturing “Hicks Cattle Farm, Davidson County”; wallet stamped E.D. Hicks Jr. (III) with hunting/fishing license and other various cards etc inside; newspaper obituary clippings and some family genealogy information; ephemera related to the Dobson-Hicks Seed Company, late 19th to early 20th century; 4 letters dated 1957 related to Ed Hicks service on the Nashville Metropolitan Charter Commission; and 2 personal letters from Gov. Buford Ellington including one expressing sadness at Ed Hicks’ death in 1962. CONDITION: Most items in good condition with expected toning, light handling grime, some tears to fold lines on earlier paper items and corner chips on photographs. A few documents exhibit chew losses. Several 19th century envelopes are worn with holes. Due to the large number of items in this archive, a personal examination is advised if you are planning to bid. [See more photos →]

$7,080.00
Lot 247: 1 George Washington & 2 John Marshall Cut Signatures, Plus Mt. Vernon Albumen Print 1 George Washington & 2 John Marshall Cut Signatures, Plus Mt. Vernon Albumen Print Lot 247: 1 George Washington & 2 John Marshall Cut Signatures, Plus Mt. Vernon Albumen Print

1st-3rd items: Three (3) cut book pages with signatures including one (1) George Washington and two (2) John Marshall. COAs from Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc. will be provided for this lot. 1st item: George Washington (1732-1799) cut signature from the title page of an unidentified book, undated. Ink signature reads “G Washington” top right. 1 1/4″ H x 4 7/8″ W. 2nd item: John Marshall cut signature from the title page of “Sayings and Doings. A Series of Sketches from Life” by Theodore Hook, 1824. Ink signature reads “J Marshall” center right, with additional light pencil signatures by James Keith Marshall, John Marshall’s son, reading “James K. Marshall Leeds Fauquier” top and bottom center. 2 1/4″ H x 4 1/4″ W. 3rd item: John Marshall cut signature from the title page of “The Last of the Plantagenets: An Historical Romance” by William Heseltine, 1829. Ink signature reads “J Marshall” center right. 1 7/8″ H x 4 5/8″ W. All signatures accompanied by a leaf of folded laid paper identifying them as “two autographs of Chief Justice Marshall one of Washington” in 19th century script. Note: Marshallís ancestor William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1146 or 1147-1219), also called called William the Marshal, was an important figure in the development of classic knighthood during the reigns of Plantagenet kings Henry II, Richard I, John, Henry III, and Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou. The ìLe Mareshalsî accompanied William the Conqueror during the Norman conquest of England in 1066. (courtesy: Robert L. Hawkins, III). Note: James Keith Marshall (1800-1862) was a Virginia planter and politician. He served in the Virginia General Assembly as a delegate and as a state Senator, including after Virginia declared its secession during the American Civil War. John Marshall (1755-1835) was the Fourth Chief Justice of the United States and also served as Secretary of State under John Adams (1800-1801). 4th item: Albumen print of Mount Vernon, titled in pencil lower right and signed in pencil “Handy” possibly for Levin Corbin Handy (1855-1932), an American photographer who was related by marriage to Matthew Brady and apprenticed with him beginning at age 12. Image mounted on cardstock. Image – 7″ H x 9 1/2″ W. Cardstock – 9 3/8″ H x 12 3/8″ W. CONDITION: 1st item: Washington signature in overall good condition, slightly affected by pinprick holes. 1 1/4″ x 1/4″ area of toning, right side of paper (does not affect signature). 2nd item: John Marshall signature in overall good, strong condition, slightly affected by pinprick holes and areas of dampstaining. James K. Marshall pencil signature and inscription faint but visible. 3rd item: John Marshall signature in overall good, condition with areas of lifting to pen strokes, slightly affected by pinprick holes and foxing spots. 5/8″ x 1/4″ area of dampstaining, center right (does not affect signature). 4th item: Some grime and toning. Chipping to cardstock edges. [See more photos →]

$7,040.00
Lot 278: Abraham Lincoln Pardon, Book and Author Autographs Abraham Lincoln Pardon, Book and Author Autographs Lot 278: Abraham Lincoln Pardon, Book and Author Autographs

President Abraham Lincoln signed pardon release order for Wilburn Bybee dated Oct. 7, 1864, partially printed on blue paper, approx. 8″ x 10″, adhered within the book “Abraham Lincoln, A History” by John G. Nicolay and John Hay (New York: The Century Company, 1890; measuring 9″ x 6 1/2″), along with unrelated letters autographed by the book’s authors. These letters, also adhered to the front leaves, include a handwritten note on Supreme Court of the United States letterhead addressed to Harry Hance of West Chester, PA and dated March 11, 1886, reading “My Dear Sir, I regret I am unable to send you an autograph of President Lincoln or to indicate where one could be obtained. Yours Truly, John G. Nicolay”; and a printed note, signed in ink, on Department of State letterhead dated April 6, 1901 and addressed to Fred M. Hopkins of New York, reading “Dear Sir: The address you speak of was published by John Lane in London. I think he also has a publishing office in New York. I am not able to say whether he has any copies of the address on hand. I regret I have none myself. Yours sincerely, John Hay.” A note fully adhered to the front fly leaf from the bookseller Harry E. Davis of Chicago explains that this book was the first of ten volumes of the original 1890 edition of the first book publication of “Abraham Lincoln: A History” by Nicolay and Hay; that the three signed inserts contain original signatures; and that the book was bound in full dark blue Morocco with emblematic tooling to the order of Randall E. Briscoe, Houston, Texas, 1952. John Nicolay (1831-1902) and John Hay (1838-1905) were Lincoln’s private secretaries and biographers. After Lincoln’s assassination, both continued in political careers. Nicolay went on to be Marshall of the U.S. Supreme Court and Hay later became the U.S. Secretary of State under William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt. Wilburn Bybee of Barren County, Kentucky, was incarcerated for “Robbing the U.S. Mail.” His pardon case file is on record at the National Archives/Library of Congress and may be viewed online at http://lincolnpapers2.dataformat.com/images/1864/10/243400.pdf . Provenance: the estate of Capt. L. Bush Cole, Nashville, Tennessee (formerly of Texas). CONDITION: Center fold of pardon paper and left edges of Nicolay and Hay letters have been adhered with linen tape into the fly leafs of the book at its hinge and we have not attempted to remove them; signatures are in good, clear condition and unaffected by any adhesive or folds. The letters do show some light discoloration and small stains. Book exterior in overall good condition with a few scratches to the back cover and light edge toning. Silk end papers have some minor foxing and glue staining at edges. NOTE: ONLY Volume 1 is present. [See more photos →]

$6,608.00
Lot 51: Wm. Blount signed document, 1793 Wm. Blount signed document, 1793 Lot 51: Wm. Blount signed document, 1793

Tennessee Document signed at Knoxville, 1793, by then-territorial governor William Blount (1749-1800, served 1790-1796), along with militia paymaster David Allison and Judges David Campbell and Joseph Anderson, ordering the collection of funds for the use of the territorial government. “By William Blount, Governor in and over the Territory of the United States of America, South of the river Ohio, David Campbell and Joseph Anderson, Esquire, two of the Judges, in and for the Territory aforesaid: An act requiring persons holding monies arising from fines and forfeitures imposed for the punishment of Public Offenders, Taxes on Proceedings in Law and Equity, on the Probate of Deeds, on the registering of grants for land, and the iffuning [sic] marriage and ordinary licences [sic], as directed by the laws of North Carolina, to account for and pay the same.” In February 1790, North Carolina ceded its western land holdings to the United States. A few months later the area became the newly created Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio (the Southwest Territory). President George Washington appointed Blount territorial governor. In 1795, Blount called a meeting of the territorial legislature to request a referendum for statehood, and Tennessee officially became a state on June 1, 1796. (Source: The Tennessee Encyclopedia). Condition: Three folds across page and at edges, including a fold across the top portion of Blount’s signature, light toning and some small tears at sides, overall good condition. 12″ x 7 3/8.” Provenance: Nashville, TN collection. [See more photos →]

$6,440.00
Lot 91: Mecklenburg NC Declaration of Independence Handbill Mecklenburg NC Declaration of Independence Handbill Lot 91: Mecklenburg NC Declaration of Independence Handbill

19th century printed handbill of the text of the so-called “Mecklenburg (N.C.) Declaration of Independence,” including its four resolutions and the names of its 27 signers. The text is framed by a decorative Classical style border and features a central cartouche of an eagle over an image of two men in a boat. 10″ x 8″, mounted to a cardboard backing. Mounted beneath is a late 19th century newspaper clipping that reads –“We have been permitted to see an old paper, in the hands of Mrs. Mary Hadley Clare, of this city, great granddaughter of one of the Alexanders who signed it – the Mecklenberg Declaration of Independence. This copy, a printed handbill, is the property of Mrs. Cynthia Davidson Donoho of Hartsville, Tenn., who is a granddaughter of Dr. Ephraim Brevard, the Secretary of the Mecklenberg meeting. Mrs. Donoho is very old and she remembers this copy as a treasured thing at quite an early age. It contains the names of all the signers… This paper was evidently, judging fom the paper, execution and typography, and the coat of arms, printed at an early day after 1800. There was no printed copy in existence before that…” — The article goes on to explain the significance of the Meckenberg Declaration, said to be the first Declaration of Independence from England made in the thirteen colonies. Note: In 1819, a document called the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence was published, with the claim that it had been written on May 20, 1775 — more than a year before the U.S. Declaration of Independence was signed. But no earlier reference to that document has ever been found. Some historians believe the Mecklenburg Declaration is an inaccurate rendering of an authentic document known as the Mecklenburg Resolves (a set of resolutions passed on May 31, 1775, that fell short of an actual declaration of independence). Although published in newspapers in 1775, the text of the Mecklenburg Resolves was lost after the American Revolution and not rediscovered until 1838. Some historians believe the Mecklenburg Declaration was written in 1800 in an attempt to recreate the Mecklenburg Resolves from memory. According to this theory, the author of the Mecklenburg Declaration mistakenly believed that the Resolves had been a declaration of independence, so he recreated the Resolves with language borrowed from the United States Declaration of Independence. Defenders of the Mecklenburg Declaration have argued that both the Mecklenburg Declaration and the Mecklenburg Resolves are authentic. (Source: Learn NC (North Carolina Digital History, UNC-Chapel Hill). On various occasions throughout the 19th century, copies of the Mecklenburg Declaration were published in brochure or handbill form; this is believed to be one of those publications, probably circa 1830s. Additional provenance note: The newspaper article incorrectly states that Cynthia Donoho was the granddaughter of Dr. Ephraim Brevard; in fact, Cynthia Donoho, in whose family this piece descended, was Dr. Brevard’s neice. Condition: Discoloration, some faded areas and a small amount of foxing. Paper is glued to cardboard backing. [See more photos →]

$6,084.00
Lot 279: Rare Lea 1855 Plan of Knoxville Map Rare Lea 1855 Plan of Knoxville Map Lot 279: Rare Lea 1855 Plan of Knoxville Map

Scarce “Plan of the City of Knoxville, Tennessee” drawn by R. W. Patterson, surveyed and compiled under the direction of Albert Miller Lea, lithographed and published by Ferdinand Mayer and Company, New York, 1855. Rare map depicting the city of Knoxville, TN with streets, including Gay Street, railroads and railroad depots, including East Tennessee-Georgia and East Tennessee-Virginia Railroad, East Tennessee & Kentucky Railroad, and the Knoxville & Charleston Railroad, bodies of water, including the Holston River (later renamed the Tennessee River), roads with distances in miles to nearby towns, hills, and other points of interest, including the East Tennessee Cemetery, the Glass Works, and the Market Place (more commonly known as Market Square). Title and scale of feet, centered below map, References, top right, directional arrows, top left and lower right. Map surrounded by a five line border. Housed in a plastic sleeve and mounted to corrugated fiberboard. Image – 23 1/4″ H x 26 1/4″ W. Sheet – 25 1/4″ H x 31 3/4″ W. Sleeve – 26 1/4″ H x 32 3/4″ W. Fiberboard – 30″ H x 35 3/4″ W. Biography: Albert Miller Lea (1808-1891) was born in Richland, Tennessee, a small village not far from Knoxville. He attended the United States Military Academy. He graduated fifth of 33 cadets in the Class of 1831. Due to his high class ranking, he was assigned to the engineers and posted to Fort Des Moines in the Iowa Territory, serving until his resignation in May 1836. In 1837, despite his youth, he became the Chief Engineer for the state of Tennessee. He then worked for the Federal government determining the boundary between Iowa and Missouri. From 1839 to 1840, he was an assistant engineer on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He became a brigadier general in the Iowa militia and then the chief clerk for the U.S. War Department. In 1844, he earned his master’s degree in engineering from East Tennessee University in Knoxville and joined the faculty as an instructor. From 1849 to 1854, was the city engineer for Knoxville, as well as managing a local glass manufacturing company. He moved to East Texas in 1855. During the American Civil War, Lea was an engineering officer in the Confederate States Army with the rank of major (later, lieutenant colonel). During the Battle of Galveston on New Year’s Day 1863, his 25-year-old son, Lt. Commander Edward Lea of the Union Navy, was mortally wounded while serving on the USRC Harriet Lane. Lea himself was among the Confederate officers who boarded the captured ship, and found his son shortly before his death. After the war, Lea lived in Galveston for several years. He moved in 1874 to Corsicana, Texas, where he purchased a farm. He died of heart failure in 1891 and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Corsicana. The City of Albert Lea, Minnesota, is named in his honor. (For additional reading, see: “The Early Settlement of Albert Lea”. Sequicentennial History. City of Albert Lea, and Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 198). CONDITION: Overall good condition with foxing spots, largest 1/4″, toning, creases, stains, largest 4″ x 1″, areas of loss, largest 3 1/2″ x 1 1/2″, visible to surface and en verso of map. [See more photos →]

$5,760.00
Lot 39: 1835 Mississippi Map, Indian Lands 1835 Mississippi Map, Indian Lands Lot 39: 1835 Mississippi Map, Indian Lands

Rare early Mississippi pocket map, partially hand colored: “Map of the Lands in Mississippi Ceded by the Chickasaws to the United States in 1832 and 1834, from the actual survey by Henry M. Lusher,” approved and signed by John Bell (Surveyor of lands in Mississippi ceded by the Chickasaws) and Benjamin Reynolds (Chickawaw Agent). Boston: Pendleton’s Lithography, 1835. Map shows “Old Tennessee State Line” and “New Tennessee State Line” in colors and the dividing line for the Chickasaw and Chocktaw Native American tribes, as well as rivers, ferries and other landmarks (Bells Ferry, Cotton Gin Port, Nelson’s Bluff, Beaver Dam Lake, etc.) Gilt tooled leather cover attached, with title lettered on front, and inscribed A. (Abram) Maury on interior marbled boards. 18″ x 23″ unfolded. Provenance: descended in the family of Abram Poindexter Maury of Franklin, Tennessee. Maury (1801-1848) was an attorney and newspaper editor from Franklin, Tennessee who served as a state representative and U.S. Congressman. Provenance: descended in the family of A.P. Maury. Condition: Tears and losses along several fold lines, particularly affecting the top and left eighth of map, area of staining/foxing to lower right quadrant, wear to cover. [See more photos →]

$4,920.00
Lot 356: Abraham Lincoln Signed War Commission Document Abraham Lincoln Signed War Commission Document Lot 356: Abraham Lincoln Signed War Commission Document

Civil War military appointment commission document signed by both President Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton in black ink, dated August 1864, conferring the rank of Captain in the Veterans Reserve Corps to James H. Remington. Housed in black painted wooden frame. Sight – 19 1/2″ H x 15 1/2″ W. Framed – 22 1/2″ H x 18 1/2″ W. Note: James H. Remington was born in Warwick, RI in 1838. He attended East Greenwich Academy before going to Brown University, where he graduated as valedictorian in 1862. In September of that year he was mustered as captain of Company H, 7th Regiment, RI Infantry. His active military career only lasted until December 13, 1862 when he was wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg in Virginia. A musket ball shattered his lower jaw and he was formally discharged by reason of disability in May 1863. Remington returned to Rhode Island where he was elected in April 1863 to the RI House of Representatives as a representative from Warwick. He resigned his seat in June as he was eager to return to military service. He accepted a captain’s commission in the newly formed Veterans Reserve Corps (initially called the Invalid Corps). He was immediately ordered to report for duty at Knight General Hospital in New Haven, CT where he assisted with the formation of companies for the Veterans Reserve Corps. After serving with several different units in Connecticut and Virginia, he settled in as captain with Company E, 1st Regiment of the Veterans Reserve Corps. The company’s primary duty was in Elmira, NY to guard rebel prisoners at Camp Chemung from November 1864 to June 1865. Provenance: Private Sevierville, TN collection. CONDITION: Fading of ink to the center of the document, some minor stains to the perimeter, possible tear lower right margin. Nice clear Presidential signature. [See more photos →]

$4,864.00
Lot 261: J. S. Mosby Archive, 3 ALS, Signed Photo, 8 items J. S. Mosby Archive, 3 ALS, Signed Photo, 8 items Lot 261: J. S. Mosby Archive, 3 ALS, Signed Photo, 8 items

Archive of 8 items related to John Singleton Mosby, the Confederate "Gray Ghost," including three (3) ALS, one (1) signed cabinet card, and three (3) related newspaper articles, 8 items total. 1st-3rd items: Three (3) ALS. One page handwritten letters written on Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. stationary. From John Singleton Mosby, at the time of the letters working as an Assistant Attorney in the Department of Justice, Washington DC, to Mrs. J. D. Herblin, his cousin, Nashville, Tennessee. 1st item: Letter dated July 10, 1907. Mosby describes his life in Washington, D.C. writing "My dear Cousin: Your letter recd. I was very little hurt by being run over by a bycicle [sic] & I am entirely recovered. I recd. the picture & thought I had acknowledged it. I now live in Washington–an Assistant Attorney in the Dept. of Justice. I know the Wash. correspondent of the Boston Herald very well–Brownlow–One of my daughters & her two children live here with me. I wish very much that my official duties could at some time take me to Nashville where I was married–My love to your family. Sincerely Jno.S.Mosby". 2nd item: Letter dated December 4, 1907. Mosby expresses his continued interest in Nashville, TN, stating "My dear Cousin: I just recd. your letter of Dec. 1st. It will give me great pleasure to meet your nephews to show him some attention. Your lady friend to whom you gave the card of introduction has not yet presented it…I send you two pictures of myself…[I] have no doubt that Nashville has improved greatly since I was married there on Dec: 30th 1856. My love to your family. Sincerely yours, Jno.S.Mosby" with additional message reading "I recd. today a very kind letter from Gov. [James D.] Porter of the Peabody University of Nashville". 3rd-4th items: Letter dated October 9, 1908. Mosby mentions his friend, James Davis Porter, writing "My dear Cousin: Your letter just recd. with news of the death of my cousin Mrs. Thorne: Someone had sent me a Nashville paper announcing it. I am very sorry to hear it. When I lived in San Francisco we corresponded. She sent me her picture [which] is very much like my sister Blakely who lives in Washington. She was related to me on the Mosby side. Do you know Gov. [James D.] Porter; he lives in Nashville & is connected with the University. He is a particular friend of mine. If you ever see him remember me to him. I shall put the picture of the Mosby ancestor in my…book. I enclose a list of errata in my book [which] you can correct. My love to your family. Affectionately, Jno.S.Mosby". Includes a Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. envelope address in Mosby's handwriting, postmarked "Washington, D.C. Oct 9 1908 1 30 PM". All letters approximately 10 3/4" H x 8 1/4" W. Envelope – 3 3/4" H x 6 3/8" W. Biography: James Davis Porter (1828-1912) was an American attorney, politician, educator, and officer of the Confederate Army. He served as Governor of Tennessee from 1875 to 1879. He was subsequently appointed as Assistant Secretary of State during President Grover Cleveland's first administration, and Minister to Chile in Cleveland's second administration. As an elected state legislator on the eve of the Civil War, Porter had introduced the "Porter resolutions" which bound Tennessee to the Confederacy should war be declared. He served during much of the war as chief of staff to Confederate General Benjamin F. Cheatham, and saw action at various battles in Tennessee and Georgia. Porter spent his later years as chancellor of his alma mater, the University of Nashville, and as president of Peabody College. This was established at the University of Nashville during his gubernatorial administration. He oversaw the liquidation and transfer of the University of Nashville's assets to the Peabody Education Fund, which allowed Peabody College to be re-established near Vanderbilt University in 1909. (source: https://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/entries/james-davis-porter/). 5th item: Signed large cabinet card depicting John Singleton Mosby as a well dressed man in his late middle age. Signed "Sincerely Yours, Jno.S.Mosby". Studio marks for Tabler, 121 Post St., San Francisco, under image, lower left and right. Image – 7 7/8" H x 5 1/4" W. Card – 10 1/8" H x 7 5/8" W. 6th item: Copy of "Why I Fought for Virginia" by John Singleton Mosby, published in Leslie's Weekly, Thursday, April 6, 1911, pages 381-382. 7th item: Copy of an article titled "Gen. Robt. E. Lee's Spurs of Gold", published in the Nashville Banner, Friday, April 21, 1899. 8th item: Copy of a photograph clipped from a newspaper commemorating the unveiling of the monument designating the spot where Mosby disbanded the Mosby Rangers, April 21, 1865, published circa 1916. Biography: John Singleton Mosby (1833-1916), also known by his nickname, the "Gray Ghost", was a Confederate army cavalry battalion commander in the American Civil War. His command, the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, known as Mosby's Rangers or Mosby's Raiders, was a partisan ranger unit noted for its lightning-quick raids and its ability to elude Union Army pursuers and disappear. After the war, Mosby became a Republican and worked as an attorney and supported his former enemy's commander, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant. He also served as the American consul to Hong Kong and in the U.S. Department of Justice. CONDITION: Overall good condition with toning, foxing spots, dampstaining, tears, etc. to be expected from age. Mosby signatures in very good condition. [See more photos →]

$4,352.00
Lot 709: J.M. Barrie – Mrs. Patrick Campbell Letter Archive J.M. Barrie – Mrs. Patrick Campbell Letter Archive Lot 709: J.M. Barrie – Mrs. Patrick Campbell Letter Archive

Mrs. Patrick Campbell (born Beatrice Stella Tanner, 1865-1940) letter archive, including twelve (12) ALS written by Peter Pan author, Sir James Matthew Barrie (1860-1937) to the famous British actress. The twelve J.M. Barrie letters, written between 1888 and 1925, reflect a growing fondness between the pair over the years; James Barrie begins by formally addressing her as "Mrs. Campbell"and progresses from calling her Beatrice to Stella, and in his 1925 letter, he signs off: "My Love, JMB". The most significant letter appears to be one dated 23 Oct. 1921, transcribed by Campbell in her autobiography, "My Life and Some Letters" (beginning on page 349), in which Barrie expresses jealousy over her relationship with George Bernard Shaw: "My Dear Stella, I am much elated to find that you have preserved for so long these two old letters of mine. Is the faint perfume that I fondly think comes from them really lavender? And if it is (I wish I hadn't thought of this), is it lavender meant for me, or were my little missives merely kept so near the beautiful G.B.S. [Shaw] budget that in time they stole some of the sweetness in which, I am sure, he lies wrapt?". He also notes that writer's cramp has forced him to use his left hand to write instead of his usual right hand. Barrie letters approximately 7" H x 5" W. Lot includes four (4) additional letters and 1 telegram, all approximately 8 1/2" H x 11" W, dating from Mrs. Campbell's film career in the 1930s with signatures of Norbert Lusk, Belford Forrest, and Edmund Goulding. Biography (source: The University of Chicago Library, which holds a collection of Campbell's papers): "Beatrice Stella Campbell, known professionally as Mrs. Patrick Campbell, was a renowned English actress, famous for her portrayal of characters at once passionate and intelligent. The daughter of an English businessman in India and an Italian countess, she began her professional stage career in 1888. Her first great success was as Paula in "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray" by Arthur Pinero. Among her famous Shakespearian roles were Juliet, Lady Macbeth, and Ophelia. She also starred as Melisande in Maeterlinck's "Pelleas and Melisande," and in the title roles in Hofmannsthal's "Elektra," and Yeat's "Deirdre." In 1914 she created the role of Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," and she maintained a warm friendship with the playwright. After World War I, she played few new roles, mainly recreating her former starring parts on tour in the United States and England. During the 1930's she also played minor roles in several American films. She died in 1940 in Pau, France." Provenance: a Middle Tennessee estate, by descent from Thomas G.B. Wheelock. Note: Thomas G.B. Wheelock was known as an astute collector of African Art and co-author of the book "Land of the Flying Masks: Art & Culture in Burkina Faso". He also inherited a sizeable collection of Asian, British, and military related antiques from his grandparents, Gilded Age tycoon George Briggs Buchanan of New York, and William and Margaret Wheelock, who owned a Scottish manor home known as Bunker Hill. (Margaret Carmichael Wheelock was also a founding partner of the fashion firm Farquharson & Wheelock in New York). CONDITION: Barrie letters: All letters with small holes from apparent previous binding; Nov. 1888 letter has old tape at seams; other letters generally good condition with toning and scattered foxing. Other letters: taped seams on MGM and Picture Play letters, chipping to edges of Goulding telegram, general toning and scattered foxing. [See more photos →]

$4,352.00
Lot 604: 4 Presidential Signed Books, incl. M. Fillmore, J. Buchanan 4 Presidential Signed Books, incl. M. Fillmore, J. Buchanan Lot 604: 4 Presidential Signed Books, incl. M. Fillmore, J. Buchanan

Four (4) Presidential signed 17th/18th Century Books – two signed by Millard Fillmore, 13th President and 12th Vice President of the United States, and two signed by James Buchanan, 15th President of the United States. 1st item: An [sic] Univer[s]al Hi[s]tory, From the Earlie[s]t Account of Time. Compiled from Original Authors; and Illu[s]trated with Maps, Cuts, Notes &c. with A General Index to the Whole, Vol. X, 1747. Printed for T. Osborne, A. Millar, and K. Osborn, London. Octavo, 695 marbled edge pages, rebound in brown cloth with gilt lettering to spine. Signed and dated "Millard Fillmore Dec. 1. 1862" top of title page. 8 1/2" H x 5 5/8" W x 1 5/8" D. 2nd item: The Law and Practice of Distress and Replevin, Second Edition, by Lord Chief Baron Gilbert, 1780. Printed by his Majesty's Law Printers for Edward Brooke, London. Octavo, approximately 286 pages rebound in brown leather with original brown leather covers with decorative blindstamp borders and original brown leather spine with gilt lettering. Signed "James Buchanan" inside of front cover, with additional owner inscriptions to title page. 8 1/2" H x 5 1/2" W x 1 1/4" D. 3rd item: The Law Dictionary: Explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present State of the English Law, Vol. V, First American from the Second London Edition, originally compiled by Giles Jacob, corrected and greatly enlarged by T. E. Tomlins, 1811. Printed for, and published by I. Riley, New York, and P. Pyrne, Philadelphia. Octavo, 553 pages rebound in brown leather with original brown leather covers with decorative blindstamp borders and original brown leather spine with gilt lettering. Signed "James Buchanan" top right of title page. 9 1/4" H x 5 7/8" W x 1 3/4" D. 4th item: Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Vol. I, Second Edition, by Ephraim Williams, Esq., 1816. Printed and published by Tileston and Weld, Boston. Octavo, 564 pages rebound in brown leather with original brown leather covers with decorative blindstamp borders and original brown leather spine with gilt lettering. Signed "James Buchanan" top right of title page. 9 3/4" H x 6" W x 1 5/8" D. CONDITION: Overall good condition with foxing spots, toning/acid burn, areas of damsptaining, pencil marks, etc. to be expected from age. Signatures in overall very good, visible condition condition. 4th item: Signature slightly affected by dampstaining. [See more photos →]

$3,840.00
Lot 336: Faden N. America Map, 1796, Franklinia Faden N. America Map, 1796, Franklinia Lot 336: Faden N. America Map, 1796, Franklinia

The United States of North America with the British Territories And Those of Spain, according to the Treaty of 1784 Map, Sixth State, engraved and published by William Faden, Geographer to the King, London, 1796. Copper plate engraving with hand coloring extending from New Britain to Bahama or Lucayas, depicting the original thirteen colonies, the "Tannesse Government" with East Tennessee referred to as "Franklinia," the new national capital "Washington or / the Federal City", and Louisiana. Also depicts cities, towns, various company and Native American lands, early roads, boundary lines, bodies of water, mountain ranges, and other areas of interest. Decorative title cartouche, lower right. Reference to coloring with notation to color key that all lands not settled by Europeans "should belong by right to the Aborigines", center right. Scales, lower left. "Longitude West from London" lower left under image. Map surrounded by scale notations and line border. Ink inscription en verso of frame. Housed under glass in a gilt wood frame. Image – 20 7/8" H x 25" W. Sight – 21 5/8" H x 27 3/4" W. Framed – 29 1/4" H x 35 1/8" W. Late 18th century. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. Likely deacidified by David Lloyd Swift in the late 20th century. Not examined outside of frame. [See more photos →]

$3,840.00
Lot 606: Cheek's Cross Roads Archive, 1802-1807, Davy Crockett interest Cheek's Cross Roads Archive, 1802-1807, Davy Crockett interest Lot 606: Cheek's Cross Roads Archive, 1802-1807, Davy Crockett interest

Cheek's Cross Roads, Tennessee, leatherbound journal or ledger, dating from June 12, 1802 through June 10, 1807, for a store owned and operated during this time period by David Deaderick (1754-1823), William Conway (born ca. 1775), and David Wendel (1785-1840), plus book and cabinet card (3 items total). Located in what is now Hamblen County, TN, Cheeks Cross Roads was acquiredby Jesse Cheek as part of a Hawkins County, TN land grant in 1789 along the intersection of Stage Road coming from Abingdon, VA and Kentucky Road between Kentucky and the Carolinas. He built a general merchandisestore in about 1795 that was later expanded to add stock pens for cattle hogs, mules, and horses. The store and all 200 acres of the Cheeks Roads property were purchased by David Deaderick and William Conway, both of Hawkins County, TN, from Jesse Cheek, recorded as being from Jefferson County, TN, on a deed of sale dated November 23, 1801, for the sum of $1800, witnessed by Charles T. Porter and David Wendel. The new owners of the store built a two-story brick structure that opened in 1802 near the original wooden structure. Conway left the partnership in 1804, and David Wendel joined Deaderick, who was operating out of Jonesborough, TN, in the business. It is during this time period, 1802-1807, that the journal was used as a record of purchases made by around 900 individuals, primarily men, each with their own account numbers. William Conway and David Wendel were the main contributors to the journal, each with their own styles of recording entries,all handwritten in ink. Conway's entries likely occurred on pages 76-123, pages 153-174, and Wendel's entries likely start on pages 175-248 when he was an apprenticeclerk at the store around April-August 1803, and continuing from page 249 until the end of the journal when he became a partner.Entries began on June 12, 1802 through the end of August, 1803, on page 247, with entries for August 1 and 2, 1803 on page 248. Page 249 then jumps to January 1, 1806, and ends on page 509 on June10, 1807, with about 32 months of recorded transactions in the journal. The first 75 pages were recorded by different individuals, likely otherapprenticeclerks. The entries show that the store sold a wide variety of goods, including books, dry goods, farm implements, foodstuffs, hardware and tools, equine equipment, housewares, medicines, a few musical instruments, personal care items, and, occasionally luxury items such as a crystal necklace, tea sets with colored edges, and laces. While most transactions were conducted on the barter system without the use of coin or currency, the journal records that the British monetary system was still in use until March, April, and May of 1803 when sales were recorded in both pounds and dollars. Starting on July 1, 1803, only dollars and cents were used. In addition toitsfunction as a general store, it also served as the local post office, with Conway and Wendel both serving as postmaster, and as a bank. Included is one (1) editor signed copy of the book CHEEKS CROSS ROADS TENNESSEE, STORE JOURNAL 1802-1807, edited by Ann K. Blomquist, PUBLISHED BY Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore, 2001, and one (1) cabinet card depicting a portrait of Davy Crockett with a facsimile signature, studio marks for McCary and Branson, Knoxville TN. Journal – 13" H x 8 3/8" W x 2" D. Book – 11 3/8" H x 8 3/4" W x 1 1/2" D. Cabinet card – 6 1/2" H x 4 1/4" D. Note: Jesse Creek was acquainted with Davy Crockett (1786-1836) who grew up nearby where his parents John and Rebecca operated a tavern. In his autobiography, Crockett describes how, at age 12, he ran away from home, "I then cut out, and went to the house of an acquaintancea few miles off, who was just about to start with a drove. His name was Jesse Cheek, and I hired myself to go with him, determining not to return home, as home and the school-house had both become too hot for me." Note: Wendel left the partnership in 1817 to move to Murfreesboro, and Deaderick's son, David Anderson Deaderick (1797-1873), took over. The property remained in the Deaderick family after the death of the original David and was operated by his sons. By 1833, it had passed to James William Deaderick (1812-1890), another son of the original David. However, he was not a successful businessman and the Panic of 1837 contributed to the failure of the business. Afterwards, JamesDeaderick studied law and then served on the Tennessee Supreme Court. In 1844, Franklin W. Taylor bought the property from the Bank of Rogersville and operated the store with a variety of partners, includingHughes O. Taylor and Leeper Long. The brick store builtbyDeaderick and Conway and remnants of the wooden store built by Cheek were still standing in 1915 when Franklin Taylor showed Mr. McClung and Dr. George Mellon the location of the original Cheek's Cross Roads. While there are currently no visible signs of these early structures, there is a TennesseeHistoricalCommissionmarker at the site of the old store. (see:https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/wm57MF_Cheeks_Crossroads_1B_36). Source: Research and transcription help courtesy of Ann K. Blomquist, Dandridge, TN, editor of CHEEKS CROSS ROADS TENNESSEE, STORE JOURNAL 1802-1807. Provenance: Estate of Anne Harrison Taylor & Joseph F. Taylor, Morristown, TN. CONDITION: Overall good condition with wear, toning, dampstaining, tears, etc. to be expected from age and manner of use. Front cover and front end paper of journal are separated from spine. Numerous ink inscriptions to front end paper. Book in excellent condition. Cabinet card in overall good condition. [See more photos →]

$3,480.00
Lot 249: Rare and Early Map of TN, 1794 Morse Rare and Early Map of TN, 1794 Morse Lot 249: Rare and Early Map of TN, 1794 Morse

A MAP OF THE TENNASSEE [sic] GOVERNMENT, 1794, by Jedidiah Morse, published by John Stockdale, London, 1794. Rare. From the book "The American Geography" by Jedidiah Morse. Copper plate engraving depicting Tennessee and the surrounding states with early cities and towns, including Nashville, Knoxville, Clarksville, roads, rivers, and other bodies of water; does not show boundary lines. Title, lower right, scale of miles, top right. "Longitude We[s]t from London" lower left. Map surrounded by scale notations and a line border. Conservator label and additional information, en verso. Matted and housed under glass in a wooden frame. Image – 6 3/4" H x 9 1/4" W. Sight – 7 1/4" H x 9 5/8" W. Framed – 12 1/8" H x 15 1/8" W. Late 18th century. CONDITION: Overall very good condition. Likely deacidified by David Lloyd Swift in the late 20th century. Areas of light foxing. Not examined outside of frame. [See more photos →]

$3,000.00
Lot 301: Autograph Collection: Sports, World Leaders, Civil Rights Autograph Collection: Sports, World Leaders, Civil Rights Lot 301: Autograph Collection: Sports, World Leaders, Civil Rights

Ephemera Collection of forty-eight (48) paper items, containing 44 signatures of Monarchs, Athletes, World Leaders, Civil Rights Activists, Politicians, and other notable figures, including Queen Victoria, Margaret Thatcher, Victor Emmanuel III, Jesse Owens, Albert Speer, Karl Donitz, Coretta Scott King, Jesse Jackson, and more. 1st item: Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1819-1901) signed document concerning the general court marshal of Levi Lawrence, Private in the 6th Company of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, who was charged with "striking his superior officer and [was] sentenced to Penal Servitude for a term of five years.", dated October 13, 1868. Two read wax seals en verso. 2nd item: Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, DStJ, PC, FRS, HonFRSC (1925-2013) signed black and white photograph. 3rd item: Victor Emmanuel III (1869-1947) King of Italy from 29 July 1900 until his abdication on 9 May 1946, signed document with Italian text, dated July 1927. Encapsulated (not laminated) in a plastic archival sleeve. 4th item: American track and field athlete James Cleveland "Jesse" Owens (1913-1980) cut signature. 5th item: Nazi Germany Minister of Armaments and War Production Albert Speer (1905-1981) TLS, dated July 6, 1976. 6th item: Nazi Germany Admiral Karl Donitz (Doenitz) (1891-1980) TLS, dated May 1945, with later date November 13, 1979 in ink. 7th item: Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) Heinrich Waldemar Schmidt (1918-2015) signed printed speech titled "A Plea for Honesty and Tolerance." 8th item: German film director and actress Helene Bertha Amalie "Leni" Riefenstahl (1902-2003) signed black and white photograph. 9th item: German boxer Maximillian Adolph Otto Siegfried Schmeling (1905-2005) signed black and white photograph. 10th item: German politician Paul Lobe (1875-1967) TLS, dated March 18, 1925. 11th item: Nazi Germany black and white photograph signed "F. Thuge." 12th-14th items: Three (3) American author, activist, civil rights leader Coretta Scott King (1927-2006) TLS, one (1) dated June 24, 1983, one (1) dated February 2, 1984, and one (1) dated June 25, 1987, pertaining to the creation of Martin Luther King Jr. day and the publication of King's papers. 15th item: American civil rights activist Jesse Louis Jackson Sr. (b. 1941) TLS, dated April 12, 1991. 16th-17th items: Two (2) African-American civil rights activist Roger Wilkins (1932-2017) signed items, including one (1) TLS, dated September 17, 1987 and one (1) ALS, dated August 15, 1996. 18th item: U. S. Ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Jackson Young Jr. (b. 1932) ALS, dated July 28, 1978. Encapsulated (not laminated) in a plastic archival sleeve. 19th item: American medical researcher and virologist Jonas Edward Salk (1914-1995) signed black and white photograph. 20th item: Rose Elizabeth Fitzgerald Kennedy, mother of President John F. Kennedy, Countess of the Holy Roman Church (1890-1995) signed black and white photograph. 21st item: First Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) John Edgar Hoover (1895-1972) signed black and white photograph, dated January 21, 1947. 22nd item: U.S. Senator from South Carolina Strom Thurmond (1902-2003) cut signature. 23rd-24th items: U.S. Senator from North Carolina Jesse Alexander Helms Jr. (1921- 2008) signed paper with a calling card written by his wife, Dorothy "Dot" Helms (d. 2015) on U.S. Senate stationary, dated October 4, 2002. 25th item: U.S. Representative for Michigan John James Conyers Jr. (b. 1929) TLS, dated November 1, 1983. 26th item: Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Clarence Thomas (b. 1948) black and white photograph. 27th item: Fifteenth White House Press Secretary James Scott Brady (1940-2014) signed color photograph. 28th item: 45th Governor of Texas Dorothy Ann Willis Richards (1933-2006) signed black and white photograph. 29th item: U.S. Senator from Arizona Barry Morris Goldwater (1909-1998) TLS, dated August 5, 1964. 30th item: Tennessee Supreme Court Justice William Dwight Beard (1835-1910) ALS, dated October 22, 1903. 31st item: Indiana Supreme Court Justice Curtis Grover Shake (1887-1978) signed check, dated July 13, 1970. 32nd item: U.S. Representative from Tennessee John Ridley Mitchell (1877-1962) TLS, dated November 14, 1935. 33rd item: U.S. Senator from Tennessee and actor Fred Dalton Thompson (1942-2015) TLS, dated May 26, 1995. 34th-35th items: U.S. Senator from Tennessee James Ralph Sasser (b. 1936) TLS, dated August 17, 1994 and one (1) invitation to a holiday party. 36th item: U.S. Representative from New York Major Robert Odell Owens (1936-2013) TLS, dated October 4, 1983. 37th item: First Secretary of Labor William Bauchop Wilson (1862-1934) signed World War I era certificate issued to Katherine G. Quigley. 38th item: Israeli military leader Dayan (1915-1981) TLS, dated January 14, 1970. 39th item: President of Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito (1892-1980) signed black and white photograph. Housed and matted under glass in a black wooden frame. 40th item: American photographer Joseph John Rosenthal (1911-2006) signed Iwo Jima first day of issue cover, postmarked July 11, 1945. 41st item: Brigadier General Charles Elwood Yeager (b. 1923) signed certificate of authenticity, numbered 565/2000, commemorating the 40th anniversary of Yeager's October 14, 1947 flight that broke the sound barrier, certificate dated October 14, 1987. 42nd item: First Flight US Airmail first day of issue cover, addressed to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, signed by Leslie L. Travis, Postmaster of Joplin, Jasper County, MO (acting, 1933-34), postmarked October 26, 1936. 43rd item: The Dionne Family ALS, dated June 11, 1944. 44th item: Richard E. Davis (1926-2015) founder of KC Masterpiece barbecue sauce ALS. 45th item: Nazi Germany stationary. 46th item: King George III era broadside, printed by Charles Eyre and William Strahan, concerning an act for preventing the counterfeiting of copper coin of the realm, dated 1771. 47th item: Albumen photograph inscribed "Very Sincerely Yours Albert Lee Thurman/May 31, 1913." Housed in a manila envelope. 48th item: Color print on black paper with early schematic drawings of the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) a starship in the Star Trek media franchise. Facsimile Gene Roddenberry signature top left. Matted and housed under glass in a black metal frame. 15 1/4" H x 19 1/4" D. Most items housed in one (1) three ring binder. Provenance: the collection of Ross Webb, Brentwood, TN. CONDITION: Signatures in overall good condition, legible condition. 48th item: Not examined outside of frame. [See more photos →]

$2,816.00
Lot 248: Carey 1796 Map of "Tennassee" Carey 1796 Map of "Tennassee" Lot 248: Carey 1796 Map of "Tennassee"

Tennessee map, TENNASSEE [sic]: LATELY THE S.Wn. TERRITORY, engraved by William Barker, published by Matthew Carey, Philadelphia, 1796. From the American Pocket Atlas by Matthew Carey. Copper plate engraving depicting Tennessee and the surrounding states with early cities and towns, including Nashville, Knoxville, Clarksville, roads, forts, rivers, bodies of water, mountains, and other areas of interest such as Ross's Iron Works and the Johnson Iron Bank. Title and scale of miles, top center. "Longe: West from Philada." top right above map, "Longe: West from London" lower right below map. Map surrounded by scale notations and a line border. Conservator label and additional information, en verso. Encapsulated (not laminated) in a plastic archival sleeve and housed in a mat. Image – 5 7/8" H x 7 3/4" W. Sheet – 6 1/2" H x 8" W. Mat – 11 1/4" H x 12 1/8" W. Late 18th century. CONDITION: Overall good condition. Encapsulated (not laminated). David Lloyd Swift label indicates that the map was professionally cleaned and deacidified on February 6, 1998. Toning impression from text page, visible en verso. [See more photos →]

$2,760.00
Lot 743: 5 Single Fore-Edge Painted Holy Bible Vols. 5 Single Fore-Edge Painted Holy Bible Vols. Lot 743: 5 Single Fore-Edge Painted Holy Bible Vols.

Five (5) Holy Bible Volumes with Single Fore-Edge Paintings. 1st-4th items: The Holy Bible, Tran[s]lated from the Latin Vulgat, Vol. I-IV, 1763, 1764. Printed in Dublin. Octavos, 1,994 total gilt edged pages with four (4) watercolor single fore-edge painting, one (1) to each book, Vol. I: St. Kenelm's Chapel, near Harlesowen, Shropshire, Vol. II: Beauchief Abbey, Sheffield, Vol. III: Lilan Egweist Abbey, Vol. IV: Wenlock Abbey, Much Wenlock, Shropshire, rebound in tooled dark red calf leather with gilt borders and gilt lettering to spines, marbled end papers. Ex libris book plates, inside of front covers. 7 1/4" H x 4 5/8" W x 1 1/2" D. 5th item: The New Testament of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, Tran[s]lated out of the Latin Vulgat, Vol. I, 1764. Printed in Dublin. Octavo, 535 gilt edged pages with a watercolor single fore-edge painting of Llandaff Cathedral, Llandaff, Cardiff, Wales, rebound in tooled dark red calf leather with gilt borders and gilt lettering to spines, marbled end papers. Ex libris book plate, inside of front cover. 7 1/4" H x 4 5/8" W x 1 5/8" W. Mid 18th century. Note: All books in this lot were included on a bill of sale from John M. Bullock, Vice President of the First National Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio, dated September 6, 1984, available to the winning bidder. CONDITION: Fore-edge paintings in overall excellent condition. Pages in overall good condition with toning, areas of dampstaining. Rebound boards in overall good condition with areas of wear, corners bumped. Ex libris book plates, inside of front covers. Retail pencil inscriptions, front end papers. 5th item: Lettering to spine reads "Holy Bible Vol. V". [See more photos →]

$2,432.00
Lot 593: Randolph Family of Virginia Archive Randolph Family of Virginia Archive Lot 593: Randolph Family of Virginia Archive

Letter archive related to the Randolph family of Virginia, including Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, Lewis Meriwether Randolph – the grandson of President Jefferson and secretary of Arkansas territory- and Lewis's widow Elizabeth Martin Randolph, who became the second wife of Andrew Jackson Donelson. 13 pieces of ephemera total. Includes a circa 1838 manuscript copy of a list of personal property and buyers from the sale of the estate of Lewis Randolph, circa 1838 (fire/water damage makes last few pages illegible); a printed announcement of the opening of the Edgehill School for Young Ladies in Albemarle County by Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Randolph and Miss Mary Jane Lewis, with ALS dated Jan. 30, 1838 from Mrs. Jane H. Randolph to Elizabeth Randolph in care of her father James at his home, Fountain of Health, "near the Hermitage," expressing condolences on the loss of Lewis Randolph; Thomas Jefferson Randolph ALS to Elizabeth Randolph expressing grief at the loss of Lewis Randolph and urging her that "should any accident happen to you, have [your son] sent to me that we may rear hm as our own most cherished," dated Edgehill, Dec. 25, 1837 (large separation at fold line); George Wythe Randolph ALS to Andrew Jackson Donelson regarding the settling of Lewis Randolph's estate and stating "Lewis carried with him to the West a violin given to him by Mr. Jefferson, of a peculiar construction, different from those in common use," and asking if he might have it, dated Sept. 1, 1842. Also included is a Lewis Meriwether Randolph ALS dated August 25, 1837 from his plantation in Arkansas to James Martin in Tennessee. Randolph asks his father in law to help him acquire an Eihart or Alhart rifle and gives specific instructions about how it is to be made. Randolph also writes about bilious fever which mildly sickened himself and Elizabeth and one family of his slaves. (Randolph would be dead less than a month after writing this letter, of unknown cause). Other letter writers include C.J. (Catherine?) Randolph to Elizabeth Randolph describing Andrew Jackson ("he reminds me so much of my grandfather that I am carried back to that happy times (sic) when we were all living with him at Monticello"), and the children of Andrew Jackson Donelson, dated Dec. 21, 1835; Jane Randolph and Caryanne Ruffin congratulating Elizabeth Randolph on her marriage to Andrew Jackson Donelson (undated, holes on p. 2); political related letter to Lewis Randolph from M.L.(?) Randolph, undated, from Edgehill, on "the triumph of the Democrats in this county" and family news. Provenance: the estate of Dr. Benjamin Caldwell, Jr., Nashville, Tennessee. CONDITION: Significant fading to the letter from Lewis Randolph regarding bilious fever at his Arkansas plantation. Fire/water damage to Lewis Randolph estate sale record. Other letters generally good condition with some small losses, toning, creases, etc. Refer to description. Some previous owner notations. Scattered stickers are adhered to plastic sheaths and not on the paper. [See more photos →]

$2,400.00
Lot 246: Map of Kentucky, 1794, J. Russell, showing Tennessee as SW Territory Map of Kentucky, 1794, J. Russell, showing Tennessee as SW Territory Lot 246: Map of Kentucky, 1794, J. Russell, showing Tennessee as SW Territory

A MAP OF THE STATE OF KENTUCKY WITH THE ADJOINING TERRITORIES by J. Russell, 1794. London: H.D. Symonds. Also known as the earliest reliable map of Tennessee, the majority of which is labeled the "Southwestern Territory- Tennessee Government". "Tennessee County" and "Davidson County" are named, as is "Summer (Sumner) County," and Knoxville. North of the Ohio River is part of the Northwest Territory, with Fort Washington shown. The area south of Tennessee and Davidson Counties, is "Reserved for the North Carolina Troops," land grants for Revolutionary War service. Part of Georgia and South Carolina also shown. The Kentucky area is shown divided into ten counties: Woodford, Bourbon, Jefferson, Fayette, Mason, Madison, Mercer, Lincoln, Nelson and Logan Counties. J. Whatman 1794 watermark upper left, light hand coloring. Encapsulated (not laminated) and matted. Scarce. Image – 15" H x 17 3/4" W. Sheet – 16 1/4" H x 18 7/8" W. Mat – 19 7/8" H x 24" w. CONDITION: Several tape repairs at seams visible en verso. Light toning. [See more photos →]

$2,280.00
Lot 766: 4 Victorian Albums w/ 240 Photographs: India, Wales, Venice, etc. 4 Victorian Albums w/ 240 Photographs: India, Wales, Venice, etc. Lot 766: 4 Victorian Albums w/ 240 Photographs: India, Wales, Venice, etc.

Four mid/late 19th century albums containing two hundred and forty (240) photographic images including portrait CDVs and landscapes in Wales, Venice and India. 1st-3rd items: Three (3) small albums with one hundred and fifty-one (151) cartes de visite (CDVs) and albums prints pasted to cards. The images depict individuals such as Queen Victoria, family groups, religious and political figures, including one (1) depicting Sir Archibald Alison, 1st Baronet with cut signature, old master artists, writers, historical landmarks such as Bodelwyddan Church, Denbighshire, Wales and Venice, Italy, reproductions of paintings and sculptures, and other scenes of interest. Studio marks to cards are not visible, each card holder stamped "G. R. & Co PATENT." in gilt lettering, below image. All but one (1) housed in albums. Albums bound in tooled green and red cloth with brass tone hinges and brass tone and ivory celluloid embellishments, gilt edged card holders. and housed in a tooled brown leather box with gilt borders and navy cloth lining, stamped "W.&J. Milne…Edinburgh" in gilt lettering, underside of lid, embossed "W. S. Photograph" top of lid. Albums – 6 3/8" H x 5 3/8" W x 2 1/2" D. Box – 6 1/2" H x 8 3/4" W x 7 3/4" D. 4th item: Large album with eighty-nine (89) photographic images, including cabinet cards, cartes de visite (CDVs), and albumen prints. The images depict individuals, family groups, historical scenes, Indian historical figures, and two (2) scenes taken in India, including one (1) of a woman on horseback and one (1) of the same woman driving a one person horse-drawn carriage with three servants in the background, both photographs taken before the same building facade. Studio marks include those for British photographers such as Henry Spink, Brighton, Hills and Saunders, Eton, and W. Perry, Sandgate, American photographers such as Norval H. Busey, Photographic Art Gallery, Baltimore, and Indian photographers such as Molkenteller, Hammes and Company. Album bound in tooled brown leather with gilt pictorial designs to covers, gilt edged card holders. 11 3/8" H x 9 1/4" W x 2 3/8" D. Provenance: The collection of internationally known ragtime pianist and historian Johnny Maddox, Gallatin, TN. CONDITION: 1st-3rd items: Photographs with foxing spots, fading, etc. to be expected from age. Wear, stains, tears to albums, one green album with loose hinge plate. Box with scratches, wear, areas of loss to leather, lock is broken. 4th item: Photographs with foxing spots, fading, etc. to be expected from age. Album with wear, fading to leather, overall mothball smell, pencil retail price inscription, front end paper. Lock is broken to album. [See more photos →]

$2,176.00
Lot 596: Catalog of Books in the Nashville Library, 1825, John Overton's copy Catalog of Books in the Nashville Library, 1825, John Overton's copy Lot 596: Catalog of Books in the Nashville Library, 1825, John Overton's copy

CATALOG OF BOOKS IN THE NASHVILLE LIBRARY, MARCH, 1825, printed by Joseph Norvell, Nashville, 1825. 22-page pamphlet (including covers) with inventory of books in the Nashville library by subject matter (approximately 300 titles). Latter pages list Present Officers of the library and Library Rules. The front cover of this extremely rare imprint is signed by Judge John Overton, the early Tennessee jurist, advisor to President Andrew Jackson, co-founder of Memphis and owner of Traveller's Rest Plantation. Note: In 1813, the Tennessee General Assembly passed "an act to incorporate the Nashville Library Company." Seven directors were appointed to select a librarian, clerk and treasurer, but it wasn't until 1823 that the legislature passed an amendment authorizing a lottery to raise "up to $5,000" to actually purchase books. (Source: The Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science, published by Marcel Dekker, Inc. 1976). Note this was not a Public Library, but rather a subscription-based business venture; each shareholder was required to pay a semi-annual contribution of one dollar on each share. Persons not holding shares could, however, pay 12 1/2 cents per week to borrow a book and were required to pay the Librarian a deposit equal to the value of the book before it could be removed from the premises. The library, located "above Robertson and Eliot's Bookstore" on the Public Square, was open two days a week. This pamphlet is the earliest known inventory of the books in the collection. 7 3/4" x 5". Provenance: the estate of Dr. Benjamin Caldwell, Jr., Nashville, Tennessee. CONDITION: Paper brittle and fragile; lower edges of interior pages with deckle edges indicating possible losses; top edge with acid burn; general overall toning and light foxing; corner losses; break to thread used in binding. [See more photos →]

$2,048.00
Lot 345: Adams, Dearborn, Boyd Archive, Presidential Interest Adams, Dearborn, Boyd Archive, Presidential Interest Lot 345: Adams, Dearborn, Boyd Archive, Presidential Interest

Archive of sixteen (16) items related to the Adams, Dearborn, and Boyd families, including a journal with first hand account of George Washington's memorial service from the son of President John Adams. 1st item: Journal identified as belonging to Thomas B. Adams (1772-1832), the third and youngest son of the 2nd president of the United States, John and Abigail (Smith) Adams. The first page indicates that the journal was begun on September 1, 1799, the last entry dating May 13, 1800. Thomas mostly writes of his day to day life in Philadelphia, PA including political elections, his dinner and other social engagements, etc., however he does go into detail about the death and subsequent mourning of George Washington in December 1799. In and entry dated Thursday December 26, 1799, he writes of Washington's memorial service, stating "ÉAt 12 o'clock, a detachment of Cavalry waited on the President [John Adams] for the purpose of escorting him to Zion Church in 4th Street. Mr. Shaw & self accompanied him. After some embarra[s]sment proceeding from the misapprehension of orders by the officer who commanded the escort, we arrived at the Church, and about 1 h the proce[s]ion of the Civil & Military which was proceeded by a bier, representing the coffins of the departed Hero, born by four noncommi[s]sioned officers & the pall held by eight distinguished Citizens, also reached the Church; when General Henry Lee of Virginia delivered to a crowded a[s]sembly a funeral Oration, preceded and followed by sacred vocal & instrumental Music. The oration was flat, unfeeling, cold. Not a tear was called to moisten the parching eyes of the Spectators & bearers, not a sigh was uttered by any presentÉCould the bitterest sarcasm that language can expre[s]s be applied to this performance, would it surpa[s]s the simplest fact, the when Washington's funeral Eulogy was delivered to hundreds of his mourning Countrymen, not a tear was shed, not a sigh was heard!". 12mo, bound in soft brown leather covers. Inscribed "Emily Dearborn BoydÉP. Harrod" inside of front cover, ink inscription reading "Journal begun September 1st 1799" with later pencil inscription with Thomas B. Adams attribution, front end paper. 7 1/4" H x 4 3/4" W x 5/8" D. 2nd item: Journal belonging to Henry George Raleigh Dearborn (1809-1884), son of General Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1786-1846) and grandson of General Henry Dearborn (1751-1829). The majority of the journal appears to be transcriptions of other letters, including "Extracts from Austin's Letters", "Method of Making Wine in France", "The Hero's Philosophy. By the King of Prussia. 1773", "A Dissertation on Conjugal Felicity, with Structure on Education", and more. Octavo, hardbound three-quarter brown leather with paper sides, four green paper tabs sewn to inside of covers. Inscribed "Geo. R. Dearborn's" to spine. 8 7/8" H x 3 5/8" W x 5/8" D. 3rd item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn (1802-1880), Houlton, ME, to her brother Joseph Gilman (b. 1809), Dixmont, ME, June 20, 1831. Address panel in Pamela Augusta's hand with traces of red wax seal below. 10" H x 8 1/8" W. 4th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Houlton, MA, to her aunt, Mrs. Hannah Swett Lee Dearborn, Care of General Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn (1786-1846), Boston, MA, dated January 14, 1836. Address panel in Pamela Augusta's hand with postmark stamp from Houlton, ME, dated January 15, 1836 with traces of red wax seal either side. 10" H x 8 1/4" W. 5th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Fort Preble, ME, to her daughter Annette M. Dearborn, Care of Mr. Albert Kimball, Haverhill, MA, dated June 18, 1850. Address panel in Pamela's hand with postmark stamp from Portland, ME, dated June 19, 1850. 10" H x 8" W. 6th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Fort Preble, ME, to Annette M. Dearborn Boyd, care of C. H. Boyd, U.S.C.S., East Bowdoinham, ME, dated October 29, 1854. Includes envelope with address in Pamela Augusta's hand, with two black postmark stamps, and a blue three cent stamp.7 3/4" H x 6 1/2" W. 7th item: Civil War era ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Portland, ME, to Annette M. Dearborn Boyd, wife of Charles Harrod Boyd, Hollis, ME, September 20, 1862. Pamela Augusta mentions the Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, writing "What Terrific fighting there is going on_but I saw by a dispatch from Genl [George B. McClellan] that our victory is complete_but such a dreadful loss of life on both sides, so many of our Genls and field officers killed or badly wounded_I hope we may hear good news from [Romeyn Beck] Ayres, soonÉ". Includes envelope with address in Pamela Augusta's hand. 8" H x 5" W. 8th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Hollis, ME, to Annette M. Dearborn Boyd, Mrs. C. H. Boyd, South Gardiner, ME, October 9, 1870. Includes envelope with address in Pamela Augusta's hand, two black postmark stamps, and a green three cent Washington stamp. 8" H x 5 1/8" W. 9th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Portland, ME, to Annette M. Dearborn Boyd, Care of Major C. H. Boyd, U.S.C.S., Topsham, ME, July 27, 1871. 8 1/8" H x 5 1/8" W. 10th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Portland, ME, to Annette M. Dearborn Boyd, Mrs. C. H. Boyd, U.S.C.S. Camp, Topsham, ME, August 12, 1871. Letter written on stationary with embossed "D". Includes envelope with address that does not appear to be in Pamela Augusta's hand, with black postmark stamp from Portland, ME, October 2. 4 3/4" W. 7" H x 4 3/4" W. 11th item: ALS from Pamela Augusta Gilman Dearborn, Portland, ME, to Annette M. Dearborn Boyd, Care of Major C. H. Boyd, U.S.C.S., Topsham, ME, August 20, 1871. Includes envelope with address in Pamela Augusta's hand, with black postmark stamp from Portland, ME, dated August 21 and a green three cent Washington stamp. Envelope and stationary with embossed "D". 7" H x 4 5/8" W. 12th-14th items: Three (3) empty envelopes addressed to "Mrs. Boyd", two of the envelopes appear to be in Pamela Augusta's hand, one with black postmark stamp from New Orleans, LA, dated January 23, at 4:30 P.M., does not appear to be in Pamela Augusta's hand. Two envelopes with three cent Washington stamps, one red, one green. Note: Some of the later letters (4th-9th items) may have been separated from their original envelopes over the course of time. Letters are cataloged with the envelopes with which they were found. 15th-16th items: A Memoir of the Commerce and Navigation of the Black Sea, and the Trade and Maritime Geography, Vol. I & II, by Henry A.S. Dearborn, 1819. Published by Wells and Lilly, Boston. Octavos, 790 total stipple dot edged pages, hardbound in marbled leather with gilt blind stamped covers, gilt lettering to spine, marbled end papers, red ribbon bookmark to Vol. I. Inscribed "Emily Dearborn Boyd 1911" to front end papers. 9 1/4" H x 5 3/4" W x 1 3/4" D. Late 18th/late 19th century. CONDITION: 1st item: Covers in worn condition, separated from spine. Pages in overall good condition with dampstaining, writing in legible condition. Pages of journal are not completely filled. 2nd item: Covers in overall worn condition. Pages in overall good condition, writing in legible condition. Pages of journal are not completely filled. 3rd-15th items: Overall good condition with foxing spots, toning impressions, dampstaining, tears (primarily along fold lines and wax seals) to be expected from age. Majority of signatures in strong, clear condition. 15th-16th items: Covers in worn condition, corners bumped. Pages with toning, foxing spots, tears, damp staining, pencil marks, etc. to be expected from age. Inscribed "Emily Dearborn Boyd 1911" to front end papers. [See more photos →]

$2,048.00
Lot 258: Knoxville Register Newspaper w/Battle of Franklin, Civil War News Knoxville Register Newspaper w/Battle of Franklin, Civil War News Lot 258: Knoxville Register Newspaper w/Battle of Franklin, Civil War News

The Knoxville Register newspaper, published by J.A. Sperry, Bristol, Tennessee, Sunday, December 11, 1864, containing reports of various Civil War related news including a Union account of the Battle of Franklin (Nov. 20, 1864), Lincoln's Message to the U.S. Congress on December 9; the promotion of Lieutenant John S. Mosby, along with front page notice of The Public Laws of the Confederate States of America; and other, more routine news of the day and advertisements. The report of the Battle of Franklin, located on the back page, provides an in depth description of the events, stating "The original plan was to withdraw the force of General [John] Schofield until the meeting of the enforcements, and then give battle in the vicinity of Nashville, but the over-sanguine rebels pressed us too hard, and when Schofield perceived he could not avaid [sic] a contact, he drew up a little army in line in front of Franklin…Gen. [John Bell] Hood appeared about four o'clock, P. M. at the head of his command, and, pointing towards the lines, said 'Break those lines boys, and you have finished the war in Tennessee. Break them, and there is nothing to oppose your march from Nashville to the Ohio river'…Capt. Lyman commanding an artillery brigade in the fourth corps, had placed his batteries in most favorable positions, and from these storms of shot and shell were hurled into the charging rebel ranks. With the most reckless bravery still the rebels rushed on, and when within a few hundred yards of our works our boys opened upon them a terrible fire of musketry, that it seemed as if it were impossible for anything to live before it…At least five thousand rebels were killed, wounded or captured, while our loss will probably reach fifteen hundred. We have taken from the enemy their flags, some regiments, among them the Seventeenth Ohio, taking half a dozen each. Gen. Schofield directed the battle from the fort on the north bank of the stream, where some heavy guns and the batteries of, the twenty-third corps were placed, and which did great service in damaging the enemy's right wing". Also included, on the front page, is a proclamation from the headquarters of the War Department of West Virginia and East Tennessee of November 7, stating that "all inhabitants of East Tennessee who are serving in the armies of the United States, and who before the 1st of January 1865 shall leave said service, with the purpose of leading a peaceful and orderly life, shall receive the protection of the Confederate authorities, and shall not be taken for military service, nor as hostages for those who may be seized by the United States authorities, unless they shall thereafter be guilty of acts of hostility to the Confederate Government". 16 3/4" H x 11 3/4" W. Note: The Knoxville Register was founded in 1816 by Frederick Heiskell and Hugh Brown. It was East Tennessee's main newspaper until 1863. By that time, it was headed by Jacob Austin Sperry (1823-1896), a pro-secessionist who was forced to flee advancing Union forces as the Civil War progressed. Sperry was able to publish the Register sporadically from Atlanta and later, Bristol. This is likely the last edition of the paper published before he was ultimately captured by Union forces later that same month (making the proclamation of sanctuary for Union deserters on the front page all the more ironic). Provenance: descended in the Henry Bowers family (see related archive lot 259). CONDITION: Center fold line with toning and small losses, small edge tears up to 1/2", some fading and toning, edge folds, faint pencil inscription at top. [See more photos →]

$2,040.00
Lot 259: East TN Boone's Creek Archive, incl. CSA Henry Bowers East TN Boone's Creek Archive, incl. CSA Henry Bowers Lot 259: East TN Boone's Creek Archive, incl. CSA Henry Bowers

Archive of approximately one hundred and four (104) ALS and other documents related to Henry Bowers (1842-1863), who fought for both the Confederate States of America (CSA) 19th Tennessee Infantry, Company B, and the Union, 4th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Company B, F, and the Bowers family of Boone's Creek in what is now Johnson City, Washington County, TN. Approximately twenty (20) pre-Civil War letters, eight (8) Civil War period letters, and seventy (70) letters dating from the post-Civil War period. Topics include the Civil War and general pre and post war correspondence (1830s-1901) including matters related to Lenora Bowers' career as a teacher and to schools in general in 19th century East Tennessee. Other letters concern a relative working for the railroads, and other relatives who went west. There are eight (8) Civil War period ALS, mainly written from Henry Bowers to his sister, detailing Confederate camp conditions in the East Tennessee area during the early part of the war. In one letter addressed from Shelbyville, TN, dated March 22, 1863 he describes the position of both armies, writing "Now I'll tell something about the yanks we heare [sic] that the have fallen back towards Nashville and we heare [sic] that they have been fighting out there somewhere but I can't tell only by report…". A second letter addressed from Shelbyville, TN, dated April 19, 1863 he elaborates further, writing "The yankeys [sic] have moved their position, We are out in front of the Army and have been ever since I have been here, between Shelbyville and Murfreesboro…". Also included is one (1) land transfer deed for $1 between Lawrence Bowers and William Perry and Leah Bowers Perry, dated 1845, concerning land in Washington County; one (1) letter certifying Lenora Bowers as qualified to give instruction in the common schools of Tennessee signed by Thomas Summers, dated 1861, one (1) Niagara Falls related letter, and one (1) facsimile of the Declaration of Independence, published as a supplement to the Baltimore Sun July 4, 1887 by the A.S. Abell Co. Facsimile approximately 22" H x 20" W. Early/late 19th century. Biography: Henry N. Bowers initially joined the CSA, 19th Tennessee Infantry, Company B, until he was captured as a prisoner of war at the age of 21. He then joined the Union, 4th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Company B, F, until his death in December 1863. He was buried in Bowers Cemetery, Johnson City, Washington County, TN. Provenance: descended in the family to present consignor. CONDITION: Letters survive in various states of preservation; some with significant fading, others in good condition. Most remain readable and with chipping, creasing, toning and some small tears or light foxing. Some retain envelopes (some stamps present, others removed). [See more photos →]

$2,040.00
Lot 600: Andrew Jackson Signed Loan Guarantee, Slave Related Andrew Jackson Signed Loan Guarantee, Slave Related Lot 600: Andrew Jackson Signed Loan Guarantee, Slave Related

1836 slavery related document signed by President Andrew Jackson, Andrew Jackson Jr., and Andrew Jackson Donelson, along with witnesses including Ralph Earl and Major William Noland. With this bond, dated September, 1836, Andrew Jackson, as President, guarantees the repayment of an $8,000 loan on behalf of his adopted son, Andrew Jackson, Jr. and nephew/protege, Andrew Jackson Donelson (who also served as President Jackson's private secretary and was the Vice Presidential candidate for the Know-Nothing party in 1856). The funds were borrowed from Captain William A. Eliason, whose signature also appears on the back, above President Jackson's. The bond is also signed by witnesses including the President's close friend and "court painter," the artist Ralph E.W. Earl, as witness, and aide Major William Noland. 12 3/4" x 15 1/2", unfolded. Note: President Jackson's nephews, whom he and his wife Rachel raised from childhood, were often in a position of needing cash to finance various ventures, ranging from cotton planting to horse racing. In his book "Andrew Jackson Donelson: Jacksonian and Unionist," author Richard Douglas Spence references this Sept. 20, 1836 agreement, and writes that Andrew Jackson Donelson and Andrew Jackson, Jr. each borrowed $4,000 from Eliason, a West Point schoolmate, in order to purchase forty-four slaves for their respective plantations. Provenance: the estate of Dr. Benjamin Caldwell, Jr., Nashville, Tennessee. CONDITION: Patch across end of the President's signature and to two spots next to his sons' signatures. Overall toning, handling grime. Losses to upper edge of one page. Previous owner pencil notations. [See more photos →]

$1,920.00